(Closed) Has anyone changed their engagement ring BAND?

posted 8 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
669 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

It sounds like your in the market for a whole new setting!  I think it is fine to change up a setting if it’s ok with you and your Fiance.  Get something that will make you happy and last a lifetime.  In fact, you can get a rather identical setting (since you really do love it), but in platinum instead…no one would know the difference!

Post # 4
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

I’d take it to your jeweler to get looked out.  Did it come with free cleaning? Get it cleaned and see if it’s appearance is improved.  You can always get it rediped as well.  If the prongs are bent/misshapen, it should be fixed.  Just to warn you though, platinum is much more expensive.  Have you thought about another metal more affordable but the same durability as platinum unless money isn’t an issue?

Post # 5
Member
669 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I will offer another bit of advice actually….make sure it is 100% a change you really want to make.  A little story:  my Fiance was nervous about picking a ring size when picking out my e-ring, so he had the jeweler put the diamond in the setting only with the intention of taking me back to get the ring sized to fit my finger.  When we went to have the ring sized, the jeweler horribly ruined my ring (such a long, aggrivating, and complicated story), refusing to replace it with a brand new one.  Extremely angry, my Fiance decided to purchase me an entirely new setting  that cost way more money and was more “blingy” than my tulipset solitaire.  I was OK with him doing that at the time, but looking back on it, I wish he had just bought me the same type of solitaire setting to replace the one the jeweler destroyed (granted, my Fiance shouldn’t have had to pay for a new one, but again, that’s a whole other story).  I truly do love my ring, but I often times think about my original ring setting…..it truly sucks that it got ruined.  I liked the original setting because it had meaning behind it, but so does my new setting……sigh……just make sure you think it through fully before you make a decision!  Perhaps you can keep your old setting?  I was unable to keep my old setting.

Post # 7
Member
4419 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

If your ring is white gold, it is not tarnishing.  All gold has somewhat of a yellow tinge to it. What has happened is that the Rhodium plating has worn off. All new white gold jewelry is plated with rhodium to give it that desired pure white look. Part of the maintenance of having a white gold ring is having it rhodium plated every so often, and it really depends on each person as to how often it is done.

The heads of most settings is already platinum, so the only real advantage of changing to a platinum setting is that you won’t have to have the rhodium plating done on a regular basis.

If you love your setting, take it to the jeweler and have them inspect your setting. Most will do this for you for free. If the diamond is loose, or if any of the prongs are bent, they will tell you how much it will cost to fix it. They will also give you a quote for straightening the head if that is the only problem. 

Post # 8
Member
56 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

My white gold ring comes with a “warranty” where i can go back as often as I want and they will do any cosmetic fixes. I don’t know if they actually re-dip the white gold or if the buffer and polish it, but my FH took it before a family party and it came back looking like brand new!! Maybe you should look into that, that way nobody’s feelings will be hurt.

Post # 9
Member
2866 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I did! Just got mine back last week. It’s actually a new setting but similar to what you are having done. I had the band of my old ring completed (since it was too big) and plan on wearing it by itself when I don’t want to wear my rings with stones. My post is here.

I was super nervous about changing it and not liking it and not being able to get it back but my jeweler did an excellent job!

I agree with other posters white gold has to be re-dipped to get back to it’s original color.

Post # 10
Member
4419 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@elenam: They don’t polish or buff white gold.

Post # 11
Member
303 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I had to change my band. It was thick with holes underneath it so water/soap/lotion/antibacterial crap was getting stuck under it and irritated my finger. It got all red and flaky and itched like crazy to the point where I could never wear it. We have a warranty for this ring too as we can change it as many times as we want. The new band I would choose would have to be the same price as the original one unless we want to pay more for anything else. The diamond was transfered over to the new band at no extra cost, which is thin and 4 small diamonds in the band. I love it and feel this ring is more to my taste!

I didn’t know you can re-dip the ring. I hope you get your ring fixed so it’s sitting properly!

Post # 13
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee

like loribeth said, white gold does not tarnish, it’s the rhodium plating wearing off.  you just need to get your ring re-plated (maybe $30-40).  the jeweler may be able to fix the setting as well.  platinum is slightly harder than gold–platinum is 4-4.5 on the mohs’ scale, while gold is 2.5-3.  but in the grand scheme of metals, both are pretty soft.  you may want to consider palladium, which is slightly harder than platinum (around a 4.8), or make sure that the platinum is a platinum-iridium mix, which will bump up the hardness to 6.5.  

here’s a useful chart: http://www.tedpella.com/company_html/hardness.htm

Post # 14
Member
1729 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@zaylee: Great chart but I just wanted to point out that that’s referring to gold in and of itself being so soft, which is why it is always alloyed with other metals. Palladium is a great idea like you mentioned, but you don’t need to get straight Pd.

A white gold alloy is commonly composed of mostly nickel and gold, but if you look around you can find palladium white gold. If you get a 14k palladium WG setting, you won’t have to have the maintenance of rhodium dipping.

Post # 15
Member
4419 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@MissBabeski: You can certainly “re-dip” rings…although the jewelry industry hates it when people call it that. haha!  A lot of people will have just the inside of a ring plated because of alergies. Very few people are alergic to Rhodium, so they were able to continue wearing their original rings without a reaction.

Post # 16
Member
2734 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

For reference, I changed my 14K white gold band to a platinum band because it was turning yellow every 2 months. Some skins react with the rhodium and remove it faster than others. I’m thrilled with the change because platinum just stays white, as it is an almost pure alloy used in jewelery. I also took advantage of the change to make the band thicker and not tapered as it was originally. Here are some pics of before and after

Before:

After:

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