(Closed) Help a non-catholic think of a catholic tradition

posted 8 years ago in Interfaith
Post # 3
Member
543 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

You could light a unity candle. It’s also traditional to give flowers at the end of the cerimony to the mothers/grandmothers.

Post # 5
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Unity Candles actually are typically “forbidden” in Catholic Ceremonies… lol. Definitely a “secular” tradition that’s only come around in our parents generation and not a Catholic Tradition.  I’ve also never seen people give flowers to mothers/grandmothers… and I’ve seen a LOT of Catholic weddings.

For the most part, any Catholic traditions really focus around prayer, so I’m not really sure what you could do that wouldn’t be “religious.” How about having someone sing the Prayer of St. Francis?

Make me a channel of your peace. Where there is hatred, let me bring your love. Where there is injury, your pardon, Lord, And where there’s doubt, true faith in you.

Verse 2: Make me a channel of your peace. Where there’s despair in life, let me bring hope. Where there is darkness only light, And where there’s sadness ever joy.

Refrain: Oh Master, grant that I may never seek So much to be consoled as to console. To be understood as to understand, To be loved as to love with all my soul.

Verse 3: Make me a channel of your peace. It is in pardoning that we are pardoned; In giving of ourselves that we receive, And in dying that we’re born to eternal life.

Although, this is also Christ focused…

Post # 6
Member
543 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

Unity candles are not forbidden. About 95% of the catholic weddings ive been to have a unity candle. It’s your preists decision whether he allows it or not. Which i think is not right.

@Ngolden1: A sand ceremony is not a catholic tradition. PP is right.. most traditions focus around prayer so you might have to research a little to see what exactly you’d like. Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1556 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Would you consider a rosary belonging to one of his family members (his mother, granmother, etc,) tied into your bouquet?

 

Post # 8
Member
2889 posts
Sugar bee

I’m pretty sure our priest is doing a hand tying ceremony which symbolizes the two becoming one. I had not previously thought of this as a Catholic tradition but it was part of the ceremony he presented us.

Does anyone else have a hand tying part to their Catholic ceremony?

Post # 9
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@JessicaL: The USCCB has deemed the Unity Candle Faulty Symbolism and most churches now prohibit entirely or recommend not doing it. 

The Unity Candle is only about 30-40 years old and is not a part of the Rite of Marriage in the Catholic church… 

 

Post # 11
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@slicey19: It’s not common in the US, are you in Europe? I believe it’s more traditional there…. although, not sure on any “catholic” roots, either. The only time I’ve seen something to this effect, is the priest using his stole to tie around their hands, during a blessing. I’ve only seen this once and it was a Ukrainian Catholic wedding… 

Post # 12
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

JK. I just checked my pics. The stole was on top of their hands which were placed one on top of the other on top of a bible…. 

The stole’s around hands I’ve seen were in Protestant ceremonies… 

Post # 13
Member
1556 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

What ethnicity is your husband?  There are certain traditions that are unique to different Catholic communities, i.e., Irish Catholics, Italian Catholics, Mexican Catholics, Polish Catholics, etc.

Post # 14
Member
543 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

@KLP2010: Yes, I know this. My point is that it’s every priests decision. Many churches still do it, like mine and the other 10 Catholic weddings I’ve been to in my area. You just have to check with your church. But the OP ceremony does not seem to be in a church considering they are having an officient and doing jewish traditions too. So Ngolden1 if you wanted to do it, you could.

Post # 15
Member
1510 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

A lovely Catholic tradition is that when the ceremony has begun and the mothers of the bride and groom are to be seated, they first go up to the unity candle and light the two outer candles together.  After the couple says their vows, then, they take the two lit outer candles and light the center larger candle together. 

While the unity candle is something done by many faiths, the tradition of the two mothers lighting the outer candles is something that is done in most Catholic weddings.

What a wonderful idea to incorporate both of your religions!

Post # 16
Member
1390 posts
Bumble bee

@slicey19:Hand tying is def. NOT a traditional Catholic practice. I have a huge Catholic family and the only time I’ve ever seen hand tying is at an Episcopalian wedding. As for a Catholic tradition, I was at a Jewish/Catholic non-demonintational ceremony and the Cathloic portion involved a singing of Ave Maria which is beautiful and also the blessing of the guests on the couple (everyone raises their hands to the couple and give their blessing, it can be done in a less-religious way).

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