(Closed) HELP! Is it “honour” or “honor” on the invites??

posted 8 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
1023 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Isn’t honour the spelling Brits use and honor the spelling Americans use? I guess throwing in the u feels fancier, but I don’t think one’s right or wrong.

Post # 4
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Yeah, honour is British, honor is American

Post # 5
Member
2226 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I used “honour” cause it looked fancier!!  🙂

Post # 6
Member
6572 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2010

i’m not very fancy. i would use honor.

Post # 7
Member
803 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

actually, its used even on american invites.  Honour indicates that the wedding will be held in a church.  its also the traditional way of spelling it.  same goes with “favour”  this according to Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquitte book.

in common vanacular, its the difference between the brits and americans, but does not go the same for wedding invites.

Post # 8
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Us Canucks use the “u”. It’s the British way. I hadn’t realized it was an etiquette thing too! You learn something new every day!

Post # 9
Member
2681 posts
Sugar bee

“Honour” and “favour” are usually used on more fancy invitations or if you are having your ceremony in a church.  Honor and Favor are typically used in ceremonies that are not in a place of worship.  Just make sure if you use “honour” to also use “favour” and not mix them up.

Post # 10
Member
2196 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

Uhhh…how does a ‘u’ indicate that the wedding will be in a church?  I really don’t understand how a correlation exists there, how arbitrary is that?

 I’m having a formal wedding and will not be using a ‘u’.  Like previous posters said, that’s the British spelling, and I’m not British (nor do I think the Brits are in any way ‘fancier’ than us).  It just seems a little pretentious to me.  No ‘u’ here.

Post # 11
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

That’s interesting.  I read that “honour” is used on all wedding invtiations (as opposed to, say, a retirement party invite), but that the difference for a wedding held in a church and one conducted elsewhere lies in whether you use “honor of your presence” or “pleasure of your company.”

Post # 12
Member
2681 posts
Sugar bee

@teaadntoast – You’re right, the “honor or honour of your presence” is for a church wedding and the “pleasure of company” is for a wedding outside of a church.  I got them mixed up 🙂  But I think the spelling is still something that is a preference and to signify if is more formal or not.

Post # 13
Member
397 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

since we are having a simple wedding, we did honor.  Also, i figured since we aren’t british, there was no need for their spelling. 

Post # 14
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

I just avoided all this by deciding to get married in an old house.  “Pleasure” is spelled the same no matter where you are!

Post # 15
Member
950 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I ditto @Angeleri2bee…less formal wedding & invites, & not British, so using “honor”.

Post # 16
Member
259 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I think it is really just personal preference. We have enough Europeans and Canadians coming to our wedding that we are using the “u,” (it is a running joke in our crowd),  but I have seen several invitations where it wasn’t used and they looked beautiful.

The topic ‘HELP! Is it “honour” or “honor” on the invites??’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors