Help with older dog not accepting puppy

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
5954 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

nono :  When is he barking and nipping? Is the puppy trying to play and/or climb all over this other dog? Is the nipping actually biting and breaking the skin? How did you have them meet for the first time? Is the GSD barking when the puppy tries to play with him? If it’s truly a dangerous problem, I’d get a trainer stat. If it’s just the alpha dog telling the puppy who’s boss, that’s just how it goes. I have 3 dogs and the 2 older dogs definitely tell the puppy when they are unhappy with her. But there’s no danger.

Post # 3
Member
100 posts
Blushing bee

Puppies tend to need a lot of correcting from other dogs because they are always playing, invading personal space, etc. Is this when the nipping happens? Does it seem like corrections or do you mean the GSD is actually harming the puppy physically. Scaring the puppy and making it cry doesn’t count. 😉

You may need a dog trainer that truly understands dog behavior. Not one of these fly-by-night ones all about positive reinforcement. Positive training is great and all, but I find the ones that heavily talk about that do not have much knowledge in dog behavior.

Post # 4
Member
326 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

That honestly sounds like the dog setting his boundaries with the pup, which you should not interfere in. I have two Australian Shepherds and the one with the higher herding instinct does this to the other whenever her excitement gets high. She’s a shepherd and she’s trying to control the situation. It’s her instinct. Sounds like it could be his, too.

Post # 5
Member
62 posts
Worker bee

It can take a while for things to settle down. Also, are you not concerned with the fact that your dog is not neutered? He’s at the point where he has a good chance of getting cancer because he still has his balls. 

Post # 6
Member
1049 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

Last year, my mom got her 3rd dog. The first 2 were adults (maybe around 7 and 9?), and the new dog was around 1. My mom thought she would have to re-home the dog because of how much the puppy was jumping and nipping. She was just trying to play! The older 2 put the puppy in her place. She has to learn how to interact and play with them. My mom still puts the newer one in a separate room during the day just so there are no issues, but it takes time for them to be okay with each other.

Post # 7
Member
745 posts
Busy bee

can I ask how you ended up with a 3rd dog? My one husky just likes to keep me company and sleep most of the time, yet I can’t imagine 3 of him. Just curious.

Post # 8
Member
1688 posts
Bumble bee

Why isn’t your 8 year old dog fixed?

Post # 9
Member
100 posts
Blushing bee

katebluestone :  I know today, social media and the likes, enjoy pushing the “adopt, don’t shop” concept. Some take it a step further and vilianize breeders. But this is plain wrong. There are tons of wonderful breeders out there that make sure to mate their dogs with the best to produce healthy puppies with great temperments. While I don’t know if this is why the OP hasn’t fixed her dog, I would be able to guess that that is a possibility. If everyone fixes their dogs, we soon won’t have any dogs.

Post # 10
Member
3536 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

nono :  GSDs can be very particular with their boundaries (btw I LOVE the breed – we just lost our 13yo female). I know my girl was NOT into puppies or any dog that was just too friendly. She was firmly in the “this is my personal space” camp and “you’re not my best friend I don’t even know you” camp when it came to other dogs. She was never mean or a concern – but would most definitleh tell off overly friendly dogs, and typically would walk away from puppies if she could. It sounds like your male might be similar – he might just be “over it” with the puppy’s behavior. Puppies are much like human toddlers – they can be annoying AF to a mature dog. Some dogs are patient and love them, and others are like some humans and want nothing to do with them. Sounds like he’s trying to set boundaries with your new pup who is getting on his nerves. 

nicoleivy2004 :  in the US, there is an over population of dogs. And sure, if EVERYONE stopped breeding, the dog population would dwindle…but that’s a fallacious argument since you won’t ever get EVERYONE to stop – particularly the underground breeders and those who breed dogs for criminal activities. Adding “responsible breeding” to the mix is then making the situation worse, as there are plenty of people who purchase dogs from breeders simply because they can, but if breeder dogs weren’t available would still adopt one because they want a dog regardless. 

Post # 11
Member
997 posts
Busy bee

It’s generally not advised to have puppies with older dogs in the same home. That being said, if it doesn’t stop or gets a bit more heated, you may just have to keep the seperated at certain times of the day. Make sure the puppy is not interefering with the older dogs’ food or “special rewards” (bones, their Kongs, etc). 

Post # 12
Member
2978 posts
Sugar bee

catskillsinjune :  That’s not entirely true. If I didn’t get a dog from a reputable breeder, at a young age to raise myself, I wouldn’t own any dogs. Every dog has a trigger, and I won’t be finding out what that trigger is after the dog has already hurt someone. 

Now, I’ve helped rescue and rehabilitate hundreds of dogs over the years, but even so, my own personal dogs will be dogs I know the backgrounds on. Everyone has different dogs for different reasons, but you wouldn’t have the mixes you have today if breeders weren’t breeding dogs. Do you have any idea how many breeds would have died out decades ago if not for dedicated breeders? Obviously somewhere along the line those breedings led way to irresponsible people getting dogs and not upholding contractual agreements, but that’s not most people. 

Most people I know that get dogs from breeders do it because of the gamble rescue dogs are. It’s much less of a gamble getting a dog with known pedigrees and lineage for the last 4-5 generations. It doesn’t matter how ‘sweet’ a dog is, every dog has a trigger. People don’t realize this, and don’t recognize true dog behavior, and then wonder why they have dogs that act out, are aggressive, have separation anxiety, etc.

 

OP, you need to evaluate what is causing your older dog to react and act accordingly. Dogs should be allowed to correct other dogs and place boundaries for their personal space, but it’s unacceptable for it to escalate beyond that.

 

nicoleivy2004 :  Agree. I’ve never met any two dogs who only talk to each other in “positive” terms. Nor have I ever met a mother dog who doesn’t correct a pup. Never will you meet a pack of dogs where there are no corrections taking place. Corrections for dogs, just like humans, are a necessary communication, it just comes down to the proper correction for the offense. But agree, most of the trainers who only focus on positive reinforcement have read lots of books, and trained few dogs. 

Post # 13
Member
3536 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

MsPlucky :  I didn’t say everyone. I’m sure there are plenty of people who it’s either a breedwr for or not dog. But there are ALSO plenty of people who would have a dog regardless, but choose a breeder dog just because they can – but would rescue a dog if not given another option. As the concern here isn’t how many dogs are in the world, but rather how many homeless dog are in the world, the fact that you would have no dog at all if you couldn’t get one from a breeder is just fine. 

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