Hewlett Packard Paid Parental Leave

posted 2 weeks ago in Parenting
Post # 2
Member
13456 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I’m glad other companies are doing this.  My (US) company has had a 6 month fully paid family leave policy for years, and it was a major incentive for me to join this employer, AND stay with them. 

Post # 3
Member
104 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

Anyone have advice on how to propose parental leave policies to your company? I work for a smallish company with a family mentality but currently no parental leave other than whatever state gives. 

Post # 4
Member
6879 posts
Busy Beekeeper

missmandy7 :  my company has an OK maternity leave policy by US standards (and zero paternity), but when I got pregnant I asked for 6 months off even though we’re a small shop. After the initial “wtf did she just ask for?!” I was lucky enough to have a couple decision makers realize that their options were to get me back later than they wanted…or never. I was thinking it too but didn’t say it lol. Obviously not everyone is in a position like that, but pointing out that extended parental leave actually leads to higher employee retention is a good start. 

Post # 5
Member
269 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I love the PT work ability! I wish it was available to people who aren’t just new parents. I would LOVE the opportunity to work a PT professional job, but the options seem to be a 9-5 or PT retail type work. And a lot of roles could easily be done part time and just distributed amongst 2 people. For instance, I handle large accounts for my company and they don’t have anything to do with one another. Why not give someone, say, 3 large accounts instead of 6, and let them work PT? 

Post # 6
Member
1421 posts
Bumble bee

Getting a policy in place is the first step…the next (and harder step) is instilling a corporate culture where people feel like they CAN take the full leave without taking heat from upper level management. I am a first time mom at a law firm with a generous parental leave policy. Said firm brags about this policy publicly for PR and and recruiting. However, i did get some push back from partners about me taking the full leave. The men who become fathers have it even worse. I do not know a single guy who took the full paternal leave available. Anyone who tries gets browbeaten and guilted by partners who “back in their day” only took a day off before returning to the office. So fucking sad.

Post # 7
Member
2792 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2015 - City, State

I wish I got 6 months! I’m just grateful I get 8-10 weeks (depending on if it’s vaginal birth or c section) plus the company will pay for 2 more weeks. So a total of at least 2 months and I can also use my PTO. 

Post # 8
Member
746 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: City, State

This is wonderful news!  I have no maternity leave (FMLA, sick and personal days). 

I hope they’re similarly flexible with people who have other dependent-care responsibilities. (I really wish more companies were agnostic about dependent-care vs. specifically child-birth related leave.)  

I’m also super curious about how the career progression of part-time employees or those who took longer leaves will fare against the employees who didn’t make use of these options.  I have no idea what fairness would look like and am looking forward to reading the research as it becomes more plentiful.

Post # 9
Member
2101 posts
Buzzing bee

julies1949 :  I “lobbied” with my former (corporate) employer while I was pregnant to push for better maternity leave. I worked in the corporate office of a major US retailer, and the standard paid leave was 6 weeks. In addition to that, the nursing areas and support for women returning to work was complete BS. I approached HR about it, completed our employee surveys taking them to task over it, talked to my management about it, etc… 

I was told I could put my breastmilk in the communal refridgerator (that 1,000+ people had access to, and was regularly emptied on a whim by the cleaning crew), or obviously use my own cooler in and out of the building instead of installing a mini fridge in the pumping area. There was also an issue internally of random men using the pumping room for their lunch breaks and walking in using their badges. So to combat that, the WOMEN had to go to the front desk and ask for a key every time they needed to pump to keep the men out. Forget oh, I don’t know, harshly punishing the men that insist on creeping in the nursing room… lets just add another layer of annoyance and hoops you have to jump through for the returning moms. So when I suggested that if a mom needed to use the nursing room, she just let IT know and they turn her badge on to the room (like they did for dozens of other restricted areas in the building) and lock down unauthorized badges, I was told it was “too much work”. Mind you it was easy peasy to do it for the on site gym to keep people out, but can’t do it for the nursing room.

The expectant mothers parking spot was routinely used by the men in the company. I worked up until the day I gave birth and while I was pretty lucky that I was still pretty mobile– several coworkers had a lot of issues with swelling and unless you were in the building at 6am, you had to walk quite a ways into the office.

What ended up happening was I quit. I took my paid time + some unpaid time and turned in my notice while on leave– found another job that has better policies and made sure to let my former employer know I was leaving for a more progressive company that valued work/life/home balance more, that their treatment of pregnant women and returning to work moms sucked and left my badge there that day. 

Doubt it made any difference, but I was pretty vocal about it and did my due diligence in my own way of stating my displeasure with the corporate culture.

Post # 10
Member
1421 posts
Bumble bee

fromatoz :  this. So much this. Same shit at my office. They have policies and perks that are too much hassel to take advantage of by the ppl who need them. They won’t give pumping moms exclusive access to the mother’s room so they have to go to HR to get the key each time. Ridiculous. 

Oh, and before they put the mother’s room on lockdown (no1 uses it now bc of the hassle), someone was stealing a woman’s breastmilk out of the mother’s room fridge. Yes, stealing it. Did they fire the bastard when they found out who it was? Nope. 

Post # 11
Member
221 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2019

I work in a field that is over 90% women (I’m an RN) and I do acute care nursing where the majority of nurses are in their 20s and 30s. Usually in their 40s-50s a good number (but definitely not all!) of nurses have moved away from the strenuous 12 hour shifts on your feet all day.  I’m lucky that hospitals in my area kind of have to give generous leaves, or else nurses would just move on to the next hospital.

I can technically get 5 months paid, 6 months unpaid but I’m not planning to take all of it because 6 months unpaid is a lot especially if I’ve already been at home for 5 months!  But we’ll also play it by ear. Birth control implant comes out in 12 months!

Post # 12
Member
2641 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Here everyone has the right to request flexible / part time working and there are only 7 reasons why a company can refuse.cuppercake :  

Post # 13
Member
2641 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Some of these stories are horrific. 

Post # 14
Member
541 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: City, State

julies1949 :  I would love any form of maternity leave. Boyfriend or Best Friend gets 5 months and my company makes you use your PTO (2 weeks) and disability (6 weeks @ 60% of your salary)

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