High testosterone.

posted 11 months ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
225 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2019

Following as I’ve been contemplating asking for hormone labs drawn since we are on month 14 of TTC with no luck… excess chin hair draws me to a possible testosterone or PCOS issue. 

Post # 3
Member
1089 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

Have you talked to your doctor about PCOS? I have it, and high testosterone and excess body hair we’re the first big clues! (I was actually diagnosed as a teenager though).

Lots of women with that condition manage to have healthy babies! Many need medical intervention (myself included. Still trying, finally got put on a fertility medication last cycle🤞🏻) but there are also plenty who don’t need help and manage to conceive naturally. If you do get a diagnosis of PCOS, there is lots of info about suggested eating/lifestyle changes that can help combat some of the effects! Don’t worry quite yet, you’ve got plenty of time to figure things out ❤️

Post # 6
Member
1089 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

View original reply
@endlessloop:  I feel you, I’m 31 now (we started trying when I was 30) so I totally get that feeling of the clock ticking. I’ve never gotten pregnant before either!

I am certain it’s possible to get pregnant with high male hormones. I’m in a Facebook group for women with PCOS who are TTC and there are lots of success stories!

As for doctors starting treatment, you do have to try for a while first, and also the fact that you have pretty regular periods is a really good sign that you might not need any treatment. You could very well get pregnant on your own and not even need anything, so they’ll definitely have you try for a while first. 

I discovered pretty early on in our trying that I don’t ovulate regularly, which made me a good candidate for medication. Once you start trying, you’ll need to try and track ovulation too and I think that information could be really useful for both you and your doctor in terms of whether or not you’ll have any issues.

I know it’s way easier said than done, but I’d try to not worry about it until you’ve actually been trying for at least a few months and have a better idea of what is going on with your body.

Just remember: High testosterone doesn’t automatically mean you will have trouble conceiving! 🙂

Post # 7
Member
2639 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

View original reply
@endlessloop:  my infertility issues were different, but it sounds like your doctor already has done a more thorough work up than most people would have before even starting to TTC.  You are still young in terms of being able to get pregnant, and yes if you live somewhere with universal health care your doctor will be very unlikely to dive deep into diagnostics before you even know there’s actually a problem (these tests all cost someone money whether you pay oop, insurance pays or universal health care pays).  

My advice is for you to start charting your cycles with basal body temp (you can read taking charge of your fertility) if you are not on hormonal birth control, that will give you an idea if you are ovulating and how regularly. If you are still on birth control then you can always stop it and use condoms until you are ready to TTC so your body can regulate itself again (this can take up to a year in some women).  

otherwise stressing over something that you don’t know for sure is a problem is a waste of negative energy.  No one is going to recommend you go straight to ivf without trying first and no one is going to put you on fertility drugs if you are ovulating on your own regularly.  So you should gather more info about your cycles (I’d aim for 6-8 cycles at least because it is normal to have a weird or wonky cycle sometimes).  You can also start TTC sooner than 2021 if it really scares you and your husband is on board.  At your age most doctors will not do further fertility investigation until you have tried for a year. 

Post # 8
Member
2030 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

I’m with PP on possibly TTC sooner. Is there a reason you are waiting so long? I don’t mean to scare you, but PCOS doesn’t make it only hard to get pregnant, but it can be difficult to have a viable pregnancy even after you conceive. But PP is right; no doctor will prescribe scientific intervention without you trying for a year (and rightfully so – rash judgments on intervention could mask real, underlying issues on both parties, and the wrong type of intervention could make it even harder to conceive). 

Post # 9
Member
1644 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2017 - A vineyard

I have high testosterone but they refused to diagnose me with PCOS because an ultrasound found no cysts. It’s also not uncommon for me to go 3 to 6 months with no period. Oftentimes more. I thought this meant I would have trouble conceiving for sure but I guess we were lucky because I ended up with an oops baby with my husband pretty much right after my wedding. 

If you are already married I would try pushing it with the doctor to see if there is anything else to check. They refused with me because I was single at the time and they just wanted to force my period. Not do anything else.

Post # 11
Member
184 posts
Blushing bee

View original reply
@endlessloop:  I want to share my story to give you a little positivity. I have PCOS, diagnosed 10+ years ago when I had irregular/absent periods, weight gain and in the setting of a strong family history of diabetes. I got an IUD to deal with my periods, and life went on. I got married last year and I am 34 so we wanted to TTC pretty soon after. I went to a reproductive endocrinologist before we even started trying to talk about my PCOS, since some women have difficulty ovulating naturally and need a little help with meds. We talked and came up with a plan — she did a transvaginal ultrasound, which was normal, then recommended Ovasitol, which she said had helped some of her patients ovulate. Then she told me to call her when I was ready to have her prescribe me drugs to ovulate. I got pregnant on the second cycle with a chemical pregnancy and then again on the fourth cycle — I’m now 14 weeks with this baby and things are coming along fine. So you don’t need to struggle for a year, and you do have agency in this process, and it is possible to get pregnant with PCOS. Good luck to you, and I hope you have an easy journey with TTC.

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