(Closed) Home birth? I'd love to hear your story

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 46
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

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FoolsintheRain:  I applaud you in your insistance on sticking with academic sources regarding homebirthing.  I might suggest you look at the lit review conducted by King Edwards Hospital in Perth (Australia).  Its thorough, contemporaneous and the Aussie healthcare service is similar to the Canadian.  It also looks at PLANNED birth at home with a skilled attendent – many studies look at all babies born outside a hospital regardless of whether it was a planned HB with professional care or a 24 week baby born prematurely on the way to hospital.  This massively skews results to the point that such studies are essentially null.  Good luck bee 🙂

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by  roseapalooza.
Post # 49
Member
97 posts
Worker bee

I’m just wondering if you’re aware that there are risks, and want to look at academic sources (completely understandable!) — why would you want to do it anyway?

Do you know your blood type? Do you have any chronic diseases or health issues? Even normal women can have preclampsia.

I’m not trying to be preachy, just concerned. Had I not begun donating blood 2 years ago I would not have known my guy and I have opposite blood types and I am eligible for Rhesus disease in which my blood can literally attack a fetus.

If you do go for a homebirth, get a very thorough health examination first, cuz you never know.

Post # 50
Member
743 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I had an absolutely awesome, empowering and exhilarating planned home birth last April. Granted, it was a fast labor (especially with a first baby), and everything went smoothly. I did have high blood pressure towards the end of my pregnancy so I got weekly ultrasounds, non stress tests and blood tests starting around 35 weeks. I did have an hemoragee after the birth but my midwife took care of it and everything was fine.

A good midwife does not take unecessary risks and will let you now if you are not a good candidate. It’s not for everybody, but I’m so, so glad that I did stick to my guts and did not let naysayers take over

Post # 51
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2899 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

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ehrmac:  Homebirth doesn’t mean going without prenatal care entirely. Her midwife will be able to monitor her for Rh incompatibility and preeclampsia, and if she winds up developing preeclampsia, no responsible midwife would allow her to deliver at home. 

Post # 52
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

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KatieBklyn:  Well said😊😊😊

Post # 53
Member
343 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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ehrmac:  I encourage you to read about midwife care a little more. my husband and I do have positive and negative blood. My midwife caught this at Our first appointment and I’ll be getting the Rhogam shot just like any other pregnant mom. In fact, I feel way safer with a midwife overseeing my care because she caught my low progesterone and hypothyroidism before they caused another miscarriage. regular OBs won’t even test for these after three losses in a row, which is two too many. 

I had the option for genetic testing(I opted out), we had a full anatomy ultrasound, and i have just as many prenatal appointments as with an OB. Except my appointments last over an hour (one on one), I can have peek-in ultrasounds just for peace of mind, and I have her cell phone number and can call/text with any questions. 

Post # 54
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3003 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

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ehrmac:  Just like
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KatieBklyn and 
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nataliegrace90 said, midwives are trained medical professionals. I had all my care with midwives at a birthing center and they did all the same things an OB would have done. I just had my 20 week anatomy scan elsewhere since they don’t do ultrasounds there. Also, our birth center looked just like a little house with pictures on the walls and cabinets, etc. But when we toured it, they showed us that “hidden” all over the place is medical equipment- IVs, pitocin, fetal monitors, oxygen and oxygen masks, and all kinds of medical stuff that I didn’t recognize. It’s not like the midwife just shows up to your house with some towels and boiling water…..

Post # 58
Member
700 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

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FoolsintheRain:  a year ago, my neighbor gave birth to her little boy at home.  The pregnancy and birth went fine, but he died a week later.  He had a correctable heart defect, but needed an operation as soon as he was born.  Her midwife  didn’t catch the problem.

To say that my neighbor is devastated is an understatement.  Regardless of where you give birth, please make sure that you get proper care before and after your baby is born.  Sometimes doctors and hospitals are necessary.

Post # 59
Member
1937 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I’m doing a home birth in June and would love some ore scientific reading on statistics and outcomes. Do you have any particular sites/links that you’ve found balanced and informative?

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