(Closed) "Home Checks" for Rescues

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
933 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Our home check was less than 10 minutes. I cleaned frantically beforehand to prepare, and then she didn’t even look at the whole house.

Post # 4
Member
540 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

Ours was a house check for a kitten!  They asked where his litter box and food bowls would go, and they also wanted to meet other animals in the house.  I had to sign a contract stating that I would never allow him to go outisde and that I would give him back to the rescue if I decided to rehome him for any reason (including pregnancy!).  I also had to sign a form that I wouldn’t declaw him.  My parents had an outside cat, and they could not find any rescues that would allow them to adopt a dog since the cat lived outside and wasn’t an inside cat.  They ended up getting a dog from a shelter.

Post # 5
Member
11234 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Most of the time, it’s so they know that you don’t live in a dump or are a hoarder/puppy mill/etc. SOME rescues are way more strict than others.

Post # 7
Member
11234 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@CherryWaves:  It’s a little silly, imo, when they’re trying to home dogs, but refuse because of something stupid/small. I don’t agree with keeping a dog outdoors (what’s the point?), but it might be better than being stuck in a cage all day. The rescue that I volunteered at just judged whether or not they needed to do a home check on your app and your personality. 

Post # 9
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Most home visits are very laid-back.  I have had a couple done for me, (we have fostered for two different rescues), and I have done a couple for other people as a volunteer for one of the groups.  Bascially, they just want to make sure you are not cuckoo, and that the environment is safe for a dog.

Do be aware that keeping your dog outside, or mostly outside, may mean you are denied a dog.  Dogs are pack animals, and really should be part of the family.  My parents grew up on farms and had the same feelings you and your Darling Husband did; dogs and cats were outside animals just like the cows, horses, etc.  Growing up, all of our dogs were outdoor dogs.  We didn’t get our first indoor dog until one winter it was so cold our outdoor dog couldn’t keep warm even with blankets and heaters.  She was a senior citizen at that point, (I would say probably 12 years old), and spent the last two years of her life happily in our house as a couch potato.  We will never have another outdoor dog.  After researching dogs and canine behavior, it just isn’t an ideal situation for them, (with the exception of working dogs like herding dogs and LGDs).  

Rescues want what is best for their dogs, and many won’t adopt to people who keep their pets outside.   You may have better luck going to a shelter, since many shelters don’t have as strict an adoption policy.

Also, please do a little research on indoor/outdoor dogs and consider making the switch to indoor family members. 

Post # 11
Member
4495 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Ours lasted about 30 minutes but most of it was just sitting on the couch talking about our pets. They briefly looked around parts of the house – not the entire thing and not the basement at all. I was kind of surprised that it wasn’t more thorough.

Post # 12
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

@CherryWaves:  I find that very sad.  I personally would rather have no dog/cat than have one that was an outside pet, but that’s just my personal feeling on the subject.  My parents have changed their mind on the subject, but my grandma (dad’s mom) can’t believe that we have our large dog inside, (he’s a 70+ pound golden retriever/lab mix), and is shocked that I want to have *gasp* Great Danes in the house someday.

Post # 13
Member
2065 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@adoc86:  That’s what ours ended up being. A 5 minute walk around to make sure we had safe environment and weren’t crazy people wanting to hoard animals to fight or whatever, then 30 minutes sitting around chatting about dogs and watching the new dog run around and play with the older dog.

Post # 14
Member
2395 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

The two rescue foundations we looked into required us to have 8 foot fences, which was a no go beings we live in a townhome with no backyard….but we live 1 1/2 miles from a dog park which we take our dog to every single flippin day.  Oh well. 

I actually talked to a lady at the dog park yesterday who said her experience of going through a rescue adoption was actually harder than when she adopted her two younger kids.  She was joking and said it sarcastically, but I’ve heard that more than once.  Don’t know if Denver is just a tougher place to rescue from, but that’s been my experience.

We ended up going to a local animal shelter and adopting there…now I have my psychotic spazoid of a dog which I dearly love…most of the time…when she hasn’t left me treats on the carpets 😉

Post # 16
Member
9082 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

I had a pet rescue back home in California and I did a home check on a case by case basis. There was usually a lot of phone/email communication but if someone just felt strange for one reason or another, I’d request a home check.

I don’t know about everyone else, but I basically checked to make sure the house was secure (No missing windows, loose doors, not that I went around checking them but I eyeballed them), the house was generally in a good state, I asked where the pet would be living, where food/water bowls would be, where a litter box would be. I met the other pets to make sure they were in good health and not aggressive or mean, I watched how they (The pets) interacted with any other pet in the home, how they interacted with me and their owners.

Generally they just want to make sure your home is safe. Most rescues go through hell and back (We rescued a few kittens that had been set on fire) and you want them to have a stable home.

I wouldn’t worry about it too much.

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