(Closed) "Home Checks" for Rescues

posted 9 years ago in Pets
Post # 17
Member
8480 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Did you tell the rescue it would be an outdoor dog? Most will not even consider placing a dog in that type of environment.

Post # 19
Member
390 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@CherryWaves:  They said she wasn’t caring for it properly. She had always been an outside cat and would totally lose her cool if you brought her inside. We only tried once haha.

Post # 20
Member
1218 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

My neighbors and DH and I all applied to adopt from a couple of different rescues – Our neighbor was turned down by all of them because she has two strictly outdoor dogs, and we were turned down because we don’t have a 6 foot privacy fence around our property. So you might prepare for that to be a possibility for you too.

Post # 21
Member
7039 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

They may not be ok releasing a puppy to someone who doesn’t plan on at least initially keeping the puppy inside until it is older and more independent. Be prepared for push back against that.

Post # 22
Member
4090 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@CherryWaves:  Well are fenced yards a requirement for this particular group?  How about having dogs as indoor family members? 

I think a group that going through the hassle of a home check is probably going to want both of those items personally.

How would you keep the dog safely on your property if you have no fences and you’re not outside?

Each group has their own requirements. 

The groups that usually have the least requirements are city/county pounds.  So you don’t have to resort to breeders even if the group you are looking at tells you no.

Post # 23
Member
3949 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

Our old neighbor had one.  The neighbor had to submit letters from her neighbors, us, that she didn’t leave her current dog outside in the fenced in yard unattended.  That she in fact sat outside all day and watched the dog.  Baltimore does have a high rate of dog theft. 

She had to jump thru some  extra hoops, get a padlock for the fence gate, but she did get the dog.  Seems silly some of the things they look for, if you have a good home.

Post # 24
Member
4090 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

My dad was a strict outdoor pet only person.  I grew up that way too.  He would tell me to put a stick of butter on top of the fridge and check it in a week.  I don’t know what is point was really.  I guess to disgust me so much over the amount of dog fur flying in the air that I would immediately kick my dog outside?

 

Anyway, he came to visit me once and my dog is indors.  I could not believe the amount of love and attention he gave my indoor dog.  He doesn’t even pet his own dog at home! 

 

I am a believer that people can change and don’t thave to do what their parents did.

Post # 26
Member
6980 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

I understand that your DH is against an indoor dog, but I think that probably just means you should not get a dog rather than you should get a dog and just make it live outside. There are really valid reasons that vets and basically everyone in the animal care world recommends keeping pets mostly inside, and by adopting a dog (from the rescue or buying one from whomever) you’re taking that dog’s chance away to have a family that he could actually live with and be a part of their lives 24/7 as he should be. Maybe you could talk your husband into some other sort of pet he’d be okay with in the house. What about a cat? Or a hedgehog? They are super incredibly adorable. 

Post # 27
Member
7039 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

@CherryWaves:  They may or may not be ok with that, again. Dogs are pack animals, and want/need to be with their families. Which is you and your DH (and eventually your other dog). It’s much more complicated than “Dogs are animals and should be outside”. When you look st a dog’s natural instincts and social behaviors, they really need more indoor interaction. The rescue may or may not be a stickler for making sure the dogs go to families with that understanding….but it’s really something you guys should think about further.

Post # 28
Member
1664 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2024

@CorgiTales +1

I think it’s great when someone has land and dogs can run free once in awhile while watched by the owner, however being outside or tied up or in a garage (even if heated/cooled) isn’t cool. There are so many things that can go wrong (animal is too hot or too cold, getting attacked by other animals etc). I agree with the other bees that said maybe another dog isn’t right for you at this time, maybe a hedgehog or guinea pig that can be in a cage, maybe DH would be ok with that.

Also the way I feel about this is because I had a neighbor who was a farmer who had the same mentality, his dog was tied up from the time it was a puppy, that dog had no shelter on hot/cold days and always howled (poor puppy) one time there was a hail storm and they weren’t home and I almost went and took the dog, thankfully it stopped hailing. I felt so bad for that dog, they just didn’t give it attention like a dog deserves and one day it got so hot the dog dropped dead and died. It was awful and they just didn’t care. I’m obviously not saying you would ever do this but it’s just why I feel like a dog should be allowed inside sometimes.

ETA: I’m also biased because I have a small dog that I love to death, is my baby and sleeps in our bed between us, she is our child and I just couldn’t ever leave her out at night.

Post # 29
Member
499 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

We had a very lengthly and detailed application we first had to fill out to apply for the puppy with references who were contacted..  Then we had a home visit which involved the rescue to bring the dog over to our house for us to meet and see if we got along.. Then she checked our whole house and each room to make sure it wasn’t a grow up.  Then she looked at our backyard to make sure it was fenced (a requirement).  We showed her the crate and where she will be sleeping/eating.  We “puppy proofed” the house ahead of time.  Then we had a meeting to discuss our work situations and lifestyle.  We had to sign a contract with quite a few points and things to follow..  (Like having to give the dog back if we ever couldn’t care for it..  Feed it high quality dog food (no name not allowed).. not allowed to be an outside dog only etc..)  They were pretty strict.  Technically they could come back anytime for a random visit but so far they haven’t.

Post # 30
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

Our home check was no time at all.  They brought our dog, and they literally walked in the door and started doing paperwork.  I think they just wanted to make sure we had a safe home and were normal people.  I’m sure it’ll be fine!

The topic ‘"Home Checks" for Rescues’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors