(Closed) Home on well water?

posted 5 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
1963 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

We had a water distiller for drinking water. Well water can be pretty sulphery tasting

Post # 4
Member
2239 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Well water can sometimes smell funky in my experience.  My Grandma’s house has well water and I don’t enjoy the way the water smells.  Fastest showers of my life.  But I don’t think all wells are like that.  I don’t have much experience

Post # 5
Member
556 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I live on well water. The water doesn’t taste too bad but it does smell kind of like sulphur. The worst part is what it does to your hair! It’s awful. Makes it dry but kind of sticky. I buy very expensive shampoo and rinse really really well which helps. The other issue is that when the electricity goes out, the pump goes out so no running water. On the bright side you’ll save money because no water bill. The electric bill for the pump is only about $10-15 a month.

Post # 6
Member
846 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I have a well that is fed by an underground spring. I love my water. I would have the well tested for sulphur or rust or any other chemicals. I once lived on a fracked property and believe me, you do not want that. Do check into that well for sure before you make an offer.

Post # 7
Member
846 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I assume it also has septic on the property. Check and see if that is up to code as well. Most septic systems have been in place for 30+yrs. If you have an old septic on the property and have to dig it up for whatever reason, it can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

Post # 8
Member
2622 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

There is nothing wrong with well water, but there is stuff to learn! I would get a book and start researching.  Where i grew up there was only well water. No one had anything else.

A PP mentioned that her well water is tough on her hair, thats likely because she has hard water. Well water (and some muncipal waters) do best with a water softener. See if the house has one, if not youll likely want to put one in.

Also ask about its capacity. Some wells can only handle a couple showers in a row so you have to spread out showers, wash etc. Others have no problem with lots of use.

There is maintenance with well water (pump, reservoir) but the good news is no water bill!!!!

If you lose power, you lose the ability to draw water typically so you have to fill bathtubs etc.

It is certainly no reason to not buy a place, but do learn about it.

 

Post # 9
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

My grandfather’s farm had well water.  It was SO COLD.  I do not remember a distinct smell in the water when I showered, but I do know that the water pressure was low…not sure if that’s  well water issue or an issue of the farm itself.  It tasted great out of the tap.  Better than the city water.  AND IT WAS FREEEEZING.  We’d fill the pool with the hose and the water was SO FRIGID.

 

Post # 10
Member
88 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Get your water checked for sulphur and iron content. We have a filtration system that handles that, known as the iron curtain. Definitely something to look into if the house doesn’t it. I also second the water softener, it’s definitely worth the expense (which isn’t horrible in cost).

One last thing with it, find out if how old the well pump is. When we had our inspection, we were told that ours is older, but it isn’t something that you know is going to go, it just stops pumping water into the house. It is something that you are going to want to keep emergency funds on hand for, just in case. 

Post # 11
Member
846 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Also just because a well may smell like sulphur does not always mean that it is sulphur. Many times it is the zinc in your water bonding with the magnesium rod in your water tank. This can be fixed by removing that rod, bleaching the tank and running the water out of it before replacing that rod with either a zinc or another magnesium rod.

If your hair is also sticky when you get out of the shower, its not only hard water but improper softening done to the water. If too much softener is added it is almost like dumping a bottle of fabric softener in your wash. There are softeners that use natural salts instead. You don’t taste the salt at all and it is much better than the chemical softeners.

As another posted suggested, it would be wise to learn about wells before you purchase a home.

I would rather have a well. My gardens respond better to natural water.

Post # 12
Member
2622 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Glenda_the_good_witch:  Ahhh, didnt know they had anything but salt softeners. its what we always had. 

Post # 13
Member
846 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Yeah they have all kinds of chemical softeners now. I did not know either until we went to replace ours and the lady gave me an odd look when I asked for salt softeners.

Post # 14
Member
285 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@kgh_isu12:  I’ve had wellwater for 15 plus years. My marriage brings my new life city water and I couldn’t be happier for the change! Well water requires a softener (if you choose), salt, maintance to yellow/orange stained housing, etc. Plus there is girly stuff that costs: like Malibu treatments for hair, buying new white clothes way too often, and bottled drinking water. I see benefits of a well in times of power outages but personally I like the city water. 

Post # 15
Member
1145 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@kgh_isu12:  if you put in an offer make sure to put down the well water quality as a contingency, as well as the well itself. Sometimes well inspections can be done. You can take two bottle of their tap water to get tested for containments. They will tell you exactly what’s in the water like your local water company does yearly.  It costs under 50$

 

Post # 16
Member
239 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I work at a place that tests well water, and I live on a well.

 

 

The first thing you should do is get it tested. Real estate transactions have different requirements based on the state, but here in Oregon the seller is required to test for bacteria and nitrate and arsenic. If there’s bacteria they can treat the well or put a UV light on the system, but if there’s nitrate or arsenic the deal’s pretty much not going to happen.

 

 

The buyer pays for a well flow test (the rate at which the well produces water) and can also get further testing done. A low-producing well can be overcome by using pressure and holding tanks. I highly recommend testing for as many different qualities as makes sense for your area – the more you know about the well, the better.

 

For example, I know that there’s nothing harmful to human or plant health in my water, but the calcium and magnesium levels are high enough that I have very hard water. I could drink it, (and do when I’m really thirsty), but it does taste minerally and we keep bottled water on hand instead. There’s no problem with showering or cooking with it, but it does make it so that my shampoo doesn’t wash out completely. (I know there are solutions to this, but I have short hair and can’t really see a difference in my hair.)  Also we can’t wash the car with it because it leaves spots. I knew all of these things before buying the place. We can get a softener, but that’s an expense that we can’t really justify given that it’s not really bothering us to have hard water. 

 

 

Definitely get the well checked out, and figure out the whole septic situation too. We’re on city sewer, but if it was a septic tank we might have passed on the place. 

 

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