(Closed) Hospital birth vs. home birth?

posted 9 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 77
Member
37 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I wouldn’t consider a home birth. Seems too risky to me. If you are considering it, just make sure to do all your research. http://hurtbyhomebirth.blogspot.com is a blog a pp was referring to. Some of the tragic stories might be just bad luck, but some are due to irresponsible midwives. Just make sure to choose one with a good track record and lots of experience.

Post # 78
Member
1218 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@nursemel:  Can you chill on all the judgment? Thanks.

Post # 79
Member
1221 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@LLRininger:  I’ll let you know in the next year, hopefully 🙂  We had our first at the hospital and we’re TTC and delivering with midwives for #2.

Post # 80
Member
1302 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@nursemel:  I’m not arguing that on rare occasions complications happen at home that could be dealt with in a more timely manner if you were already on the ward.  True. However, these situations are rare, and not always unforeseen.  I’m not saying that homebirth is SAFER than hospital….I’m saying that huge, well designed studies say that it’s AS SAFE as hospital birth.  And given how rare these very serious complications can be, the evidence indicates that you’re not putting yourself at increased risk by having a homebirth.

Also, every thing in life carries risk, including birth. Driving. Eating out.  Going on vacation.  A mother has more chance getting in an accident on her way to her prenatal appointment with me than she does having a serious complication during a birth (assuming she’s healthy and avoids *unnecessary* interventions).  Risk is almost always about perception. For example you perceive homebirth as more risky than driving a car.  That’s your perception and opinion and I respect that.  But lots of things in life carry the risk of injury or death and we accept it as an acceptble risk because it’s rare and we don’t avoid the activity in question.

p.s. I’d happily accept the risk of flying to be on a beach with a mojito in hand right now 🙂

Post # 81
Member
1380 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

RCOG does not recommend home births, but if the patient wants one, then they try to ensure that a qualified midwife will be present and that the hospital is notified in case of any complications. But I don’t know very many OBGYNs here who would recommend one (and no, it’s not a money issue, they work for the NHS with a set salary). It’s purely a safety issue with regards to the risks. I know childbirth here is far more holistic, with ‘natural’ births encouraged in the hospitals by both doctors and midwives, because of the faster recovery time, unless the woman wants any sort of intervention (and makes it extremely clear that she wants one)

Post # 82
Member
1302 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@OrchidsandCandles:  Um, actually they do:

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) support home birth for women with uncomplicated pregnancies. There is no reason why home birth should not be offered to women at low risk of complications and it may confer considerable benefits for them and their families. There is ample evidence showing that labouring at home increases a woman’s likelihood of a birth that is both satisfying and safe, with implications for her health and that of her baby.1-3

http://www.rcog.org.uk/womens-health/clinical-guidance/home-births

ETA: it’s true that ACOG doesn’t support out-of-hospital birth, but they are a self-interest group willing to publish shoddy studies that support their position, so I’m not sure that I trust their professional integrity.

Post # 83
Member
1884 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@cdncinnamongirl:  I was thinking the same thing, but didn’t have the facts to back it up.

Also, If I’m not mistaken, most other european countries advocate for home birth or midwife assisted birth, those same countries also have lower infant mortality rates (infant mortality rates in the US are around 6 deaths in every 1,000 live births source: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2091rank.html) and MUCH lower c-section rates (the US is around 30% and rising, in 2009 the Netherlands had the lowest rate at 14%).

Post # 84
Member
1015 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Here’s a good article with references on why defaulting to the hospital isn’t such a great idea.

I also recommend seeing “The Business of Being Born”, which touches on a lot of the points in the article, and even shows a home birth that required medical intervention at a hospital.

Post # 85
Member
3467 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I didn’t read  the comments BUT I’ve had a planned hospital birth and then planned a home-birth vbac with my second….. I DID transfer to the hospital as a non-emergent transfer, but still got my vbac and looking back feel that my transfer was pre-mature. My next child will be another planned homebirth and given what I’ve learned I feel pretty confident I will not have to transfer.

I did ALOT of research and everything that I found showed home-births to be just as safe IF NOT safer than hospital births since homebirths involved less traumatic & less operative births for mom. There was found to be an increase in perinatal death in one study that showed primarily to be attributed to stillbirth since most moms planning a homebirth go longer overdue than moms planning hospital births. Of course, having nst & bpp toward the end of pregnancy can help alleviate that risk.

Most of the things that bring fear in birth like post partum hemorrhage and placenta/uterine abruption CAN BE caught early and risk is less likely when fewer interventions are done. Ie. Pitocin use during labor greatly increases risk of post partum hemorrhage (it is a common & listed side effect of the drug) so considering some 90% of hospital birth moms receives pit during labor, some or even many of those pp hemorrhages likely would not have happened if they hadn’t had that intervention. This follows trend for many of the emergent things that come up in labor…. Even something like shoulder dystocia during delivery can be handled better in an out of hospital birth b/c birthing positions like all 4’s are commonly used (the Gaskin Maneuver is good for shoulder dystocia)…. You get the idea.

I was actually monitored much closer in my homebirth than I was with an electronic monitor at my hospital birth and true issues are generally caught earlier because of the one on one care. Also, since you are in your own environment you tend to be less tense which lets your body progress more effectively and helps keep baby calm as well.

Jennifer Kamel, creator of vbacfacts.com, has a write up “Why Homebirth?” on why she chose homebirth for her vbac & it is a must read for anyone considering an out of hospital birth!

I honestly could never plan a hospital birth again without some medical necessity like placenta previa…. even breech my MW is experienced in so that wouldn’t mean I needed a hospital birth either. It’s just SO much better in so many ways!

 

Oh…. as for the clean up… your MW will usually have that taken care of before you even realize! Mom & Dad are too busy loving on their baby & seriously in less that 15 minutes any evidence of a birth having just happened has been cleaned up and taken care of. =)

Post # 86
Member
195 posts
Blushing bee

i don’t think that is a very good idea. what if something goes wrong, and the person is not professional enough to handle the complication.

Post # 87
Member
434 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

We’re planning a home birth so long as we stay in the low risk category. I reserve the right to change my mind if the pain becomes too much, or of course, if a complication arises and we need to go to the hospital (which is less than 5 minutes away). I 100% trust my midwives, and there are two at every birth, one for me, and one for the baby. They are impecably trained and a wealth of knowledge and experience. 

100 years ago most women were still having their babies at home, naturally. Hospitals weren’t readily available/accessible for everyone. They’re a modern invention. Bad things can happen anywhere and at any time. 

Birth plans are a personal choice and what’s good for the goose isn’t always good for the gander. I think as women we should all respect each other and our choices and wish each other the best. My sister had 3 births in a hospital with epidural each time. At this point, that wouldn’t be my choice, but I don’t judge her for her choices and I know she doesn’t judge me. She doesn’t know much about midwives or home births, but we talk about it and she’s becoming educated on the flip side of the coin which I appreciate. 

Post # 88
Member
1884 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@babybuzz:  Thank you, I think being respectful of eachother’s decisions is super important about things like this!!  There are no need for mommy wars here.

But I also think it’s important to talk about this stuff, because before I really started thinking about kids, I always thought I would give birth in a hospital with an epidural and formula feed… But after reading a ton, learning about ALL of the options out there (I didn’t know we had a choice!) I realized that I wanted to try natural childbirth and breastfeeding.  Sometimes you just need to educate yourself and figure out what is right for you, if that means an epidural or c-section then so be it. 🙂

Post # 89
Member
507 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010 - Catholic Church & The Engine Room at Georgetown Studios

@quelee:  It sounds like you might not know much about midwifes.  Forgive me if that isn’t true. Certified Midwives are professionals and are trained to handle situations that arise like a baby not breathing at the time they are born. They also carry with them oxygen and the basic rececustive equipment.  They can handle most situations short of performing surgery. We aren’t talking having some backwoods untrained person catch your baby- this is a profession.

For the most part I have really enjoyed reading along this discussion- however, I find it a little unnerving how much fear mongering there is around homebirth with little basis in facts.  Midwifery was almost made extinct by the hosptitals and big medicine years ago who ran campaigns portraying midwives as backwoods, uneducated, etc. Worst of all they also used racial stereotypes to push people into hospital births.  Even more disturbing is that when birth first moved into the hospital you were more likely to die there than from giving birth at home. Today home birth is as safe as hospital birth.  Midwifes have a much lower ceserian rate than hosptals. As previous posters have commented you are more likely to have certain complications in a hospital setting because of routine and sometimes heavily pushed interventions like Pitocin and epidurals. 

To get a good grounding in the history surrounding birth in general and get some perspecitive on where we are today, I suggest reading The Surprising History of How we are Born by Tina Cassidy. It is very enlightening.

And finally, maybe we can all agree to not resort to argument tactics that say “Don’t you want the best for your baby”  “If you cared about your baby you would have it in the hospital”.  No woman on this board would say “Yes, I wish to deliberately bring harm to my child” and there is well documented evidence (cited by PP) that attended home birth is as safe as hospital birth. While you may not personally make the choice please don’t deride the well-informed and well-researched decisions of others.  I do not deride my friends who give birth in a hospital and I expect them to not deride my choice to birth in an independant birth center. 

Post # 90
Member
705 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@pretzel:  A midwife is still NOT a physician though and no amount of equipment makes them one.  They carry around type and crossed blood of the mother in case she hemmorhages after birth?  They trained to start an umbilical iv line in baby and start fluids if necessary(actually I would hope not…since that is something only a Dr can do)?   

 

You can go have your baby at home, still comes off as a very selfish move so that you can feel more like a natural mom.  Just not a decison I understand at all.  Not when you can still have a natural birth in a hospital, but with the backup medical care there in case something goes horribly wrong. 

 

Modern medicine is a blessing, not a curse like some of you bees try to portray.  You keep making the hospitals sound like these big, bad, horrible places to have your baby and they simply are not. 

Post # 91
Member
507 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010 - Catholic Church & The Engine Room at Georgetown Studios

@nursemel:  WOW you are making assumptions and passing judgement on my reasons of which you have ZERO knowledge. I don’t recall ever telling you WHY i want to birth outside an hosptial. To make myself feel more natural isn’t one of the reasons. Perhaps your arguments would be stronger if you actually cared to understand the different reasons why women chose to birth outside the hospital instead of lumping them into the only reason you can fathom that a woman would chose this route- it is a gross over simplification and is insulting. 

My independant birth center is 3 minutes door to door from the hospital. The midwives have a great relationship with the hospital and we will definately transfer there if necessary. I think 3 minutes is an appropriate amount of time for transport. 

You asked why I would chose to birth outsdie the hospital when I could have a natural birth inside the hospital.  The following passage explains how I feel:

Judith A. Lothian, RN, PhD, LCCE, FACCE in Do Not Disturb: The Importance of Privacy in Labor says:

“Women choose to give birth in hospitals because they believe it is “safer” than birth outside the hospital. In fact, laboring and giving birth in most hospitals create a set of physiologic responses that actually occur when we feel unsafe and unprotected. In the typical hospital environment, women are disturbed at every turn—with machines, intrusions, strangers, and a pervasive lack of privacy. The shadow of “things going terribly wrong at any moment” follows women from one contraction to another. Together, these fears contribute in powerful ways to the release of stress hormones, moving women into an attitude of physiologic fight or flight. On an intellectual level, a woman may believe that the hospital is a safe, protected environment, but her body reacts quite differently. No matter what her head says, her body gets the message loud and clear. Her body responds on a primal, intuitive level, kicking automatically into fight-or-flight mode and dramatically altering the process of labor and birth. In choosing modern medical “safety,” women are stressed physiologically, which makes labor and birth more difficult. The lack of attention to women’s inherent need to not be disturbed in the typical hospital environment has set the stage for an almost 27% cesarean rate, the routine use of epidurals in labor, the high rates of augmentation of labor, and the high incidence of instrument deliveries in the United States.”

I got that from this article which I suggest you read, if you are intersted in understanding a perspective that you said you cannot wrap your head around today. 

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