(Closed) Hospital Vs. Home Birth Vs. Birth Center

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 62
Member
313 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

Had a totally normal and health pregnancy.  Week 36 baby settled into breech position and wouldn’t be turned.  I was glad that I started the process with an OB/GYN and planned a hospital birth because we scheduled a c-section.  It was such a relief that my doc who I knew and trusted was doing the surgery.  i know there’s a movement to deliver breech babies, but even a slightly greater risk to my baby wasnt worth it.  Additionally, he would have been too big for safe breech delivery guidelines.  

I think there’s a place for non-hospital births, but I also think we are forgetting how dangerous birth could be before medical intervention.  There’s a balance somewhere between life/health saving intervention and overly medical births.  

Post # 63
Member
2902 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

nikkiibee:  Where does the author say “by government order?” How about: by educating women on the difference between CPMs and CNMs? Or by laws that restrict anyone but a CNM from practicing at a home birth? No one is proposing that we put laboring women in handcuffs and march them to the hospital. But if you’re defining “shaming” as “telling a pregnant woman that there’s a significant risk of herself or her baby dying or being injured as a result of the choice she wants to make,” then I think that perhaps she should be “shamed” in that particular way.  

When I was in labor, I was on a magnesium drip. It was awful and I hated it. But my blood pressure was around 170/110 before they put me on it. At one point, I asked the doctor, “Can I just refuse to be on this anymore?” and he said, “Yes. We can’t make you stay on the magnesium. It would be assault, and if you really want us to take it out, we will. But I have to tell you the risks of going forward without it.” And after he explained them to me, I was like, “Okay, yeah, I’ll keep it in.” The whole thing was probably one of the worst experiences of my life, but it was still a hundred thousand times better than a) my baby dying b) my baby suffering from a birth injury c) me having a stroke d) me dying. Honestly, I’m not one of those martyr moms who believes you have to sacrifice everything and always put your child’s needs ahead of your own every second of the day, but I have a hard time understanding how anyone would argue that they have the right to have all of their choices explained to them as if they’re equally okay, or the right to be uninformed of the consequences of their choices. Especially when those consequences can be severe, irreversible and permanent. 

I’m totally in support of home births when they are with CNMs, because they are highly educated and experienced and willing to risk-out women who aren’t appropriate candidates for home birth. I wouldn’t support a law that literally said “we will arrest you if you don’t give birth in a hospital.” But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a whole lot of work to be done to make birth safer for women and babies, and some of that work needs to be done in the legislature. 

The thing about interventions is that there’s no way of knowing which ones were really unnecessary. The only way you can tell is in hindsight – like when a baby is stillborn after 72 hours of broken membranes and 43 weeks of pregnancy, you can look back and be like, “yeah they probably should have induced labor there.” Or when a macrosomic baby gets a brachial plexus injury after a shoulder dystocia, you can be like, “mm, probably should have had a c-section.” But then it’s too late. But you can’t look ahead and say, “Ah, KatieBklyn isn’t going to have an eclamptic seizure at 41 weeks and kill herself and her baby, so let’s just wait this one out” which means that someone has to take an EDUCATED guess. Emphasis on educated, and I don’t mean “I watched the Business of Being Born and I read Birth Without Fear every day.” I mean, “I’ve been to medical school and attended hundreds of deliveries and I keep up with current research and recommendations.”  

Post # 64
Member
2075 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

truthah:  Pain is caused by anxiety and fear; not childbirth. Fear -> Tension -> Pain as the muscles of the womb should be relaxed to help the baby out. Statistics are very dependent on multiple variables. Women have been giving births at home (in various cultures) for many centuries; it is sure a blessing to have choices. I wouldn’t base my decisions on internet articles that are trying to scare people away from home births. (I was at first deterred from choosing home births until I did a very extensive research.) There are many alternatives out there that can help with pain management without the use of drugs.

Having certified midwives who can recognize risks from early on can save both the baby and the mother. Bearing in mind that every birth is different, statistics usually don’t tell the full story anyway.

Post # 65
Member
1326 posts
Bumble bee

Cynderbug:  

They aren’t getting to scare people away… What makes you think that?! 

Post # 66
Member
2075 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

ana2017:  You will love it! I’m quite similar like you — I’m an adrenaline junkie; I work well under anxious/stressful situations to meet deadlines, but stress and childbirth don’t mix well as you have explained. It is a huge time commitment for both the birth partner and the expectant mom to practise the techniques, but I am confident it will pay off when baby’s birthday comes in less than 3 weeks. The only birth videos on YouTube that I dare to watch are the ones who do Hypnobabies, lol. They all look so calm, relaxed and comfortable when using self-hypnosis. The other amazing thing is that there’s a track you can opt to buy if baby is not in a favourable vertex position to turn baby from breech/traverse to vertex. I haven’t really looked too in detail about the other Hypnobirthing — the Marie Mongan’s method. I found Hypnobabies to be very comprehensive as it also educates you in an unbiased manner on birth choices. Tip: Midwives also love working with Hypno-moms, which can help you get on with a midwife sooner after signing up on a waiting list.

It’s too bad that traumatizing birth scenes sell so well on TV because childbirth can be pretty normal, healthy and safe for both mother and baby. We rarely hear positive birth stories because we tend to hear complainers’ side of things.

Post # 67
Member
2075 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

truthah:  Ah, I just read the article. 100 women is too small of a sample size, considering the population of the country; I wouldn’t call that 45%.

Post # 68
Member
3009 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Cynderbug:  I agree with you on many points. I have a somewhat similar philosophy on birth- I went in unafraid and looking forward to experiencing it. I prepared for a positive, calm experience. I did hypnobirthing and it really helped me. I also spent most of my labor walking around and then in the tub and shower. It was just me and my husband and sometimes our midwife. However, what I’ve learned about birth is that it can go lots of different ways and everyone’s labor and birth is different, not just how they conceptualize it. Some births nautrally lend themselves to being med-free and some don’t, and there is a lot of area in between. My contractions as I neared the second stage of labor, especially during transition, were painful. Hypnobirthing is awesome, but I still experienced pain. My son’s birth was much more intense and difficult than I expected it to be. I had to push for over three hours because the cord was wrapped around his neck and shoulders and it was very difficult- there was no simply “breathing the baby out.” That is just my own experience, though, yours will be completely different. I had a positive experience despite the pain. Pain is part of living. So I do have issue with you claiming that childbirth doesn’t hurt. Yes, relaxing helps, the tub helps, counterpressure helps, hypnobirthing helps, my birth coach helped, but it still hurt. If your baby’s birth was completely painless, that is awesome. But claiming all births can be is pretty ridiculous. 

Post # 69
Member
2325 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

Cynderbug:  verting a baby with hypnosis? that, I’d like to see. How much do they charge for that track?

At least no one’s mentioned the Bradley method yet.

Post # 70
Member
1326 posts
Bumble bee

Cynderbug:  

The sample size wasn’t 100 people, it was just another way of saying 45%, as in 45/100. It’s clear in context but not if you just skim the article. 

There another article with further statistics, I just didn’t post it because it’s heavy, the link I put was the layman’s page. 

I also didn’t say I was going to USE all of the drugs for no reason, just that I wanted them ON HAND in case I did need or want them, and some of them are not available for home births. I don’t yet know what I am or am not going to do, but I don’t want my medical options limited, personally. 

 

I do find it very strange though that when I put a fairly reputable organisation’s website up your immediate instinct was to brand it as “scaring people off of home births” without even reading it. 

Post # 71
Member
9811 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Cynderbug:  I can agree with most of what you’re saying but I completely disagree that the only pain during childbirth you feel is what is caused by anxiety or fear.  I didn’t have any anxiety or fear going into mine.  It hurt more than anything else I have ever experienced (including broken legs).  There might be some women who really don’t feel much pain but I think that is an EXTREMELY small minority and shouldn’t be something women expect to happen to them.  I have sat with a friend in labor who looked extremely calm, relaxed, and eyes closed during contractions (like the women in your videos).  You know what, it still fucking hurt!   I totally agree that anxiety and fear make things worse (and slow labor) but to imply the majority women are capable of going through birth without feeling any pain is sort of ridiculous.  Some women in CERTAIN situations mind lend themselves to that but you have no idea where your birth will go.  You can’t expect it to go picture perfect.  I think hypnobirthing or bradley is awesome but I think it’s extremely unrealisitc to imply most women can achieve labor without any pain whatsoever.  Having your baby turned is also quite painful.  Not trying to be rude, I just think this is completely unrealistic for most women, especially because a lot of births do not go as planned.  Please report back on if you were pain-free the whole time!

Post # 72
Member
6775 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011 - Boy #1 12/2015, boy #2 02/2018

I chose to give birth at a hospital with a midwife. I’m glad I did.I had to be induced with drugs because my water broke. I had a good experience and would do it again this one being my first baby. I would like to have the opportunity to have a water birth, so I might choose a birthing center for my next baby. I don’t think I can plan for a home delivery. It seems too risky in my opinion. 

Post # 73
Member
1184 posts
Bumble bee

Not pregnant but TTC soon. I’d like to give birth in a midwife led unit. Here in UK midwife led births are the norm (even in hospitals with consultants). If something goes wrong I could be in a consultant led ward quickly  

For me, I don’t like the medicalisation of birth, normalised intereventiOn. 

Post # 74
Member
894 posts
Busy bee

I’m having a midwife birth in a hospital. If there are any complications, the OB at the hospital will deliver the baby. This isn’t uncommon where I am (Canada). I asked and was told if there are no complications and both the baby and I are doing well, I could leave the hospital a few hours after the birth (I think she said 4). I would prefer to get out of there and into my own bed if all is well since the midwife will continue to provide us with post-partem care at home. I have the option to stay in the hospital for 24 hours after the birth (again, assuming all is well and there are no complications) if I choose though so it’s not like I have to leave that early either. 

Post # 75
Member
3729 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: City, State

I had a completely unmediated hospital birth with an OB. My birth quickly became an emergency and I would not have been able to safely deliver at home or a birth center. Both would have immediately transferred me to an OB after delivery and I may not have made it.

Given the complications with my first, I’m risked out of a birth center birth or midwife delivery. I will likely deliver at home/in an ambulance or in the hospital with an OB.

I watched a ton of pro-natural childbirth videos and midwives are awesome, but there’s a reason so many people used to die in childbirth. Scary shit can happen and sometimes you need a surgeon and don’t have time for a transport.

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