(Closed) House divided on politics?

posted 2 months ago in The Lounge
  • poll: U.S. bees - Do you and your significant other support the same or different presidential candidates?

    Same candidate

    Different candidates

  • Post # 16
    Member
    6978 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: April 2016

    View original reply
    @anonymousbee001:  Well it’s one thing if you’re doing it because you don’t like either of the other 2 candidates and are doing some form of protest vote. If you actually believe in that platform and vote it every time it’s not really up to me to say you’re wrong. It’s what you actually believe in. My husband wouldn’t be voting Democrat regardless. 

    But you’re free to believe what you believe. It doesn’t affect my household. 

    Post # 17
    Member
    7707 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 1997

    In this election, Dh and I are voting the same. I voted that we support the same candidates.

    I do want to say, though, that we haven’t always agreed on politics. I am old enough to remember a time when I could honestly say that the two people running for President were probably good men (women didn’t really run much in the past). Yes, I absolutely disagreed with one candidate about politics, but way back in the dark ages when I was in college, there was big talk about the Republican Party giving up their socially conservative stance and going with just a fiscally conservative platform. As we know, that didn’t happen, but I won’t sit here and claim that John McCain or Bob Dole were evil people just because I didn’t support them for president. 

    Today, the difference is much starker, IMO. Dh leans more fiscally (and socially) conservative than I do, and we’ve always been able to agreeably disagree about that. But he is also a genuinely good and caring man, and he cares about the morality of the candidate he supports; he can spot a fool when he sees one. In this election we are in agreement, but that has not always been the case. But in some previous elections, I never felt it was necessary for us to completely agree the way I feel that now.

    Post # 18
    Member
    1126 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    I can’t be friends with anyone who supports 45, let alone be married to one!

    Post # 19
    Member
    8256 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    In Canada our political parties are not quite as different as in the US. I could be with someone who supported a different party up here. But I don’t think I’d be able to date/marry someone who believed in the right wing American style politics. There are too many moral choices and dilemmas there for me to overcome personally.

    Post # 20
    Member
    4108 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    DH and I are the same political party, but we voted for different people in the primaries. My husband was actually quite passionate about one of the nominees to the point that we still have a yard sign up, he purchased several T-shirts, bumper stickers were involved, etc. We good naturally used to tease each other about whose candidate would secure the nomination, full well knowing Biden would likely win the nomination. DH would give passionate speeches about why he loved his candidate so much and it never turned into an argument. I loved how engaged he was. 

    When neither of our first choice candidate got on the ticket, we immediately sucked it up and wholeheartedly and excitedly plan on voting for Joe Biden. 

    However, if it was a matter of my husband supporting Trump, either now or in 2016, we would have separated and divorced. It is far less to do with political affiliation and much more to do with a certain level of morality, integrity, and things I can stomach.

    For what it is worth, when my husband and I first started dating, he leaned very much Republican. He voted for the first time in the 2012 election and he was pretty torn up until he entered the voting booth on who he was going to vote for, and ultimately voted for Obama, but he did not mind Romney. 2012 politics somewhat feels like a lifetime ago, because we would have some debates, but it was never a deal breaker. After the 2016 election with the current Republican candidate, it would be an absolute no-go. My husband officially changed his political affiliation in 2016 so that he could vote for Bernie and in the years following he has become much more liberal than I am through his own life experiences and coming to his own conclusions about things. Now, we are both on the same page and feel pretty similarly towards important issues. 

    Post # 21
    Member
    722 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2017

    We voted for different candidates in the last election and I remember SOBBING on election night. It caused A LOT of fights because I couldn’t see how a person I love so much could just vote against everything I stand so strongly for on a whim. He now regrets his choice and sees things differently. We will be voting the same way this time. 

    Post # 22
    Member
    10541 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: August 2016

    We’re pretty much in agreement on everything politically. When we get into deep dives on topics/policy there’s some disagreement but I can’t imagine us ever voting for different candidates, especially in the presidential election.

    I have family that are trump supports and that’s hard enough. I really don’t know that I could be married to someone who supported that man. It would just show such a huge difference in our values and ethics. 

    Post # 23
    Member
    7707 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 1997

    View original reply
    @MrsMeowton:  Yes, even 2012 politics seem a world away. 

    I grew up in a time when Congress people would debate issues by day and share a drink and a meal with one another in the evening. Reagan and Tip O’Neill started as opponents, but learned to compromise, get some things done and even to like one another. That seems impossible now. 

    Will we ever get past obstructionist politics where people oppose things simply because it was the other party’s idea? Now, not only do the parties not work together, but a person can face career wrecking retribution from their own party. It’s scary and sad.

    Post # 24
    Member
    1641 posts
    Bumble bee

    View original reply
    @llevinso:  I wasn’t making a moral argument (although I could): I was pointing out in the absence of rank-choice voting, a third party vote has no impact on the final result in the US.

    Post # 25
    Member
    4108 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    View original reply
    @echomomm:  Some of my best friends voted for Romney in 2012. We had good natured debates. There was some snark, but we were able to coexist. 2016 was like some weird Twilight Zone episode and every day since has just felt like a dystopian nightmare. Of the friends who voted for Romney in 2012, almost all voted for third party or Hillary in 2016. The few that went all in on Trump are now no longer friends of mine. Again, cannot stress this enough: It has zero to do with party affiliation and more to do with a level of morality, ethics, and decency that seemed to be missing and that I could not allow. Not trying to make myself sound like a righteous, flawless person. It sort of put a magnifier on other personality flaws and in the years following those people tipped fully into a level of thought I cannot comprehend. It’s sad, but hey. They are free to do what they like. 

    Post # 26
    Member
    6978 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: April 2016

    View original reply
    @anonymousbee001:  Oh I agree with that. And my husband knows that too. It doesn’t change his vote though because he actually believes in what he’s voting for. 

    Post # 27
    Member
    2867 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: March 2017

    My DH and I vote for different presidential candidates. I guess we cancel each other’s vote out. We talk politics some but we don’t really let it become a fight. It’s not worth fighting over. 

    Post # 28
    Member
    7551 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    View original reply
    @emilyofnewmoon:  genuinely curious here. If you support most of the Biden platform, why do you still feel you’re holding your nose when you cast your vote? This notion that you need to be “pumped” or somehow excited by the candidate (any candidate) ends up working against us as a nation, by suppressing a lot of voters (particularly young voters) who think that a candidate who doesn’t thrill them can’t possibly be a good choice. 

    Post # 29
    Member
    2278 posts
    Buzzing bee

    View original reply
    @Horseradish:  Biden was a big cheerleader of the War on Drugs that has brought devastation to black communities across the country. I feel, like many politicians, he changes his positions on things when it’s politically convenient. I don’t think he’s a bad guy, but of all the candidates in the democratic primary he was toward the bottom of my list. 

    Not sure why you’re addressing the bottom part of your comment to me. I’m not pumped for Biden but will still be voting for him. I do not need to be “pumped” for a candidate to vote for them. I would have voted for an inflatable doll over Trump. 😜

     

    Post # 30
    Member
    996 posts
    Busy bee

    DH and I differ on politics – I’m a lifelong Democrat, he’s an Independent. He voted 3rd party in 2016. 

    We are both voting Biden this year. 

    If he was voting even 3rd party, I’d have a problem with it. As a Bee said earlier, a 3rd party vote in the US Presidential Election is unfortunately a wasted vote. I have been angry on and off at DH for having voted 3rd party in 2016, bc (as I see it) his desire to remain politicallly pure gave us Trump. I feel like he cared more about his political distaste than me, as a minority woman, my parents, as immigrants, or my sons, as minorities. In his defense, he said that he didn’t think Trump could actually screw up this badly. 

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