House Hunting WWYD: There's a pipeline in the back yard…

posted 2 years ago in Home
  • poll: What would you do?

    Go for it

    Run away

    Run far away from it

    Other

  • Post # 16
    Member
    3267 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2017

    View original reply
    mrsjersey :  you said it’s a “petroleum transmission line”? Hard no from me…. however if you do decide to move forward with it anyway,  contact the EPA as well to find out if there have been issues…

     

    Post # 18
    Member
    558 posts
    Busy bee

    Wouldn’t concern me in the least, actually, I’d probably be happy about it because it means no one is going to build something behind you, on that easement. Just be sure you know what it is and what they can do with it. 

     

    I get the environmental issues, but these lines are EVERWHERE. The likelihood of it leaking is slim to nothing, and the owner would have to fix it. Just get more info.  

    Post # 19
    Member
    134 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: April 2008

    Sorry, I would run away from this now and keep looking.

    Post # 20
    Member
    495 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2017 - Orange County, CA

    View original reply
    jannigirl :  A petroleum pipline is super different from water, gas, electric, or even sewage.  Think oil spill, chemical contamination bad, if there ever was a leak.  Not to mention that most industries have an “acceptable” rate of leakage. I would not want the risk of breathing volatile organic compounds everytime I went outside, not to mention I wouldn’t want to grow vegetables because of what they might absorb from the soil.

    View original reply
    mrsjersey :  I’m sorry, I know how frustrating house hunting can be. I would get a survey and a reliable expert opinion at the very least.

    Post # 21
    Member
    4480 posts
    Honey bee

    View original reply
    crazychickenlady :  petroleum lines are not everywhere. These lines leak frequently. And clean up is not always covered by the owner. I’ve overseen dozens of cleanups where the company that caused the contamination cannot be held responsible. I’ve seen “clean” environmental reports on properties which ended up requiring millions of dollars of remediation work. I would never knowingly buy a home next to a petroleum line. 

    OP, here is a link to a study on the impact on value:

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://proceedings.esri.com/library/userconf/proc15/papers/109_217.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiKq7Xx7b3eAhUIl1QKHW4lAm8QFjAEegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1TsujIVONJzMjhRyimJSr7&cshid=1541441791945

    Pipeline safety expert’s comments about living near a pipeline:

    https://www.desmogblog.com/2013/12/02/something-could-always-happen-pipeline-safety-official-admits-he-d-avoid-buying-home-near-pipelines-keystone-xl

    Post # 23
    Member
    2650 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    Pipelines leak, it’s not if, it’s when. I would say no. Sorry about the dream house though, that is unfortunate.

    Post # 24
    Member
    4084 posts
    Honey bee

    View original reply
    mrsjersey :  If you can confirm exactly what type of pipeline it is, I can ask my friend who is a geologist. His job is literally cleaning up underground contamination from leaks and spills such as this. And believe me…he’s very busy and the EPA is a joke, so I wouldn’t assume a leak or cleanup is unlikely or simple.

    Post # 25
    Member
    5466 posts
    Bee Keeper

    I’d call to find out what exactly it is but that’s a big no for me. 

    Post # 28
    Member
    662 posts
    Busy bee

    View original reply
    mrsjersey :  What was the story with the pipeline? 

    Post # 29
    Member
    213 posts
    Helper bee

    View original reply
    zl27 :  Thank you for that info because I (think?) this isn’t common knowledge 

    Leave a comment


    Find Amazing Vendors