(Closed) How being over-protective can physically hurt your kid

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
Post # 17
Member
2582 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

So where do we draw the line between “mind your own business” and “we’re going to stand back and let millions of parents raise a generation of malnourished, obese, sedentary children”?

I’m not asking this because I think I have the answer. I honestly have no idea. Its a touchy subject – there doesn’t seem to be a right answer.

Post # 18
Member
5089 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@abbyful:  This is just a side note to the whole topic, but why would replacing whole with skim milk have a bad effect? Skim has just as much calcium.

Post # 20
Member
2582 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

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@abbyful:  

ehhhh – it probably looked/felt like 10-15 feet when you were smaller… but was probably not that high. A fall from 10-15 feet is absolutely high enough to break even the healthiest of bones. A fall from a second story window can be fatal, and thats usually around 20 feet.

 

 

 

Post # 22
Member
3771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

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@abbyful:  “My intended point was to use this kid only as one example of what seems to be happening on a large-scale with kids across the country. “

That wasn’t what you posted about though. You posted your judgements about one family, that you don’t even know well. When you are parent you can do things your way.

 

View original reply
@mandypop:  I think all you can do is start in your own home, you can’t really make people do things they don’t want to do. We play outside almost all afternoon. When the neighbors see we are out all the kids come out and play. When my kids see them outside they ask if they can go to. We go on bike rides as a family. Giving the not as active kids the example of beings outside playing gets them out side too.

@smyley – THe medical condition is a great point. Not that long ago there was a story of a family who had their child taken away after going o the ER for many broken bones. During the investigation she as in foster care and the treatment the fmaily received lead the husband to ikll himself and wife. Only to find out a week after the murders or so that a girl had a medical condition that caused her bones to break easily.

Post # 24
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I can see your point of view. However, there are much worse parents out there to be worrying about. 3 broken arms is alot, but I remember kids in my class would have multiple injuries at times as well, it happens. Just because you read a blog, and went to one party with them, does not mean you know the full story.

Post # 25
Member
5089 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

No, calcium is not fat soluble; it is water soluble. Vitamin D is fat soluble, which does affect the absorbtion of calcium. But most children have significant sources of fat in other areas of their diets, which they consume along with milk.

Post # 26
Member
714 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2020 - establishment theatre

i said that because my friends son did just that and broke his ankle because he landed wrong. and they can tip i have seen it happen. as for where to draw the line..if you do not see a child being physically, sexually, or verbally abused you have no right to do anything. what a parent chooses to feed their child is their business. if i choose to take my kids to mcdonalds once a month I can do that. as for the topic of milk whole milk is not advised after the age of 2. which is why the WIC program switches a child from whole to skim or 1% milk after the age of two. it has to start in our own homes with our own children….

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