(Closed) How being over-protective can physically hurt your kid

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
Post # 47
Member
509 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2002

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@KatyElle:  +1

Post # 48
Member
509 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2002

Even if you are a parent, please don’t judge. Being a parent is really hard, especially if you don’t have the perfect child others want or expect you to have.

Post # 49
Member
2559 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Could you elaborate on that survey that the kids filled out? Was it forced choice or multiple (ie did they have to say only indoor games vs outdoor games were “playing”, or could they mark all of the above)? How was it worded? Was the survey result prompted by previous questions?l find it hard to believe 100% of those kids see indoor activities as their only source of playtime.

Post # 50
Member
7995 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

If we let our children play outside we are putting them at “risk” for abduction/molestation etc.  If we keep them inside we will make them obese.  Parents today can’t win because of too much judgement.    Sometimes I feel like I will be judged no matter what decision I make.

FWIW- I would never buy my daughter whole milk.  I would also not let her use the “popper” things you described.  You know- cause she will poke her eye out. :p 

Post # 51
Member
299 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I don’t get it.  If his parents don’t ever let him do anything, how does he keep breaking his arm?  That doesn’t even make sense. 

Also, aren’t you pregnant, OP?  I’d be really careful about judging other parents right now.  Karma and all of that.

Post # 52
Member
714 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2020 - establishment theatre

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@abbyful:  however even though you stated you wernt trying to be “judgy” re read the title of this post, you blantantly accuse the parents of harming their child! you all but accuse them directly of breaking his arm, thats why people are getting fired up about this post. you say they eat crappy food, however you only know what the woman blogs about on her coupon blog…that doesnt mean that all they eat every day. you have admitted you dont really know this family all that well but yet your sitting here pointing out all these “flaws”. do you know for a fact the child doesnt have a condition that you dont know about? I had a friend whos son as a mild form of autism and doesnt handle loud noises well so the party poppers i can see some parents not allowing their child to play with. maybe he has brittle bones which is why they are so cautious about the swingset. point is you have no place judging this family period. and again if your not witnessing the child being physically harmed, sexually abused or verbally abused and they arent starved then you really just need to mind your own business

Post # 53
Member
5398 posts
Bee Keeper

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@eeniebeans:  Just out of curiosity, why would you never buy whole milk? 

Post # 54
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

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@BlondeMissMolly: I’m curious, too!

I can see how this is getting misinterpreted. It would have probably been best to leave out the anecdotal evidence, because we really don’t know what goes on behind closed doors in that house, and the kids aren’t getting abused/mistreated from what it sounds like, so it’s none of our business what “they” do.

That said, I am sad about the amount of overparenting leading to children who may be more fragile physically/emotionally. As a parent in these times, though, we’re kind of between a rock & a hard place. Let them go out, they could get abducted or hurt, make them stay in, and they’re likely to be bored & sedentary, which can potentially lead to a whole host of problems. 

I’m also sad about the nutritional advice we’re given about children. Personally, my son doesn’t drink milk at all. He was BFd for 18 months, and now, the only dairy he gets is through whole milk yogurt, cheese & butter. He eats a whole foods diet with an emphasis on healthy fats, and he loves to eat, so I just don’t feel he needs the calories/vitamins offered in milk. Besides, I would prefer raw milk, but it’s illegal where we live now (and, in Ohio, it cost $20/gallon). I don’t have a problem with kids drinking milk, but when my pediatrician told me to drop whole fat dairy products (around 1, I think?), I got a new pediatrician. (And- OT vent- WHY is it next to impossible to find whole fat yogurt???). You should see what WIC recommends for babies/toddlers to be fed. It is definitely not helping anyone.

Post # 55
Member
7995 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

BlondeMissMolly  Well, mostly because I wasn’t raised on it and I think it is disgusting 🙂  But on a more serious note, I don’t think that children need the extra fat.  Now, when my younger daughter  turns 1 and requires the  whole milk, of course I will buy that for her.  But I will still buy 1% for DH, older DD, and myself.  As a family, we just don’t drink that much milk in general.  We also rarely have juice in the house as I think that has little nutritional value and prefer whole fruit.

 

Post # 56
Member
9816 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@eeniebeans:  My daughter will NOT drink whole milk! Not even chocolate. It makes her gag. She will drink 2% or skim, she will drink ice water, she will drink orange juice with calcium, but whole milk is a no go. I’ve even switched whole milk into a 2% bottle (smart kid knows the color cap of the milk she likes lol) but it’s not going to happen! I think it’s too thick for her.

Post # 57
Member
714 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2020 - establishment theatre

the taste of milk period makes my Fiance gag…his mom said hes always been that way. he cant drink milk

Post # 59
Member
299 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I am well aware of the fact that judging is not the same as observing.  Your thread title seems to say otherwise, however.  You should think about rephrasing if you were really just making an innocent observation vs. making a negative conclusion based on extremely limited evidence. 

Post # 60
Member
2017 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

Pshaw! I was so overprotective with my two boys you would have thought I was employed as an insurance actuary. Lol No skateboards or rollerblades. Bike riding only under controlled circumstances (i.e. No cars within miles).

Play was never on the street (then again we lived in the Hollywood Hills, so not ideal). They only went on playdates at other houses or we had friends over where they spent most of their time playing Super Mario.

My oldest son has Aperberger’s and would get extemely agitated if he couldn’t be on the computer.

They never drank milk and they grew up eating a regular “kid” diet. They never broke any bones and are healthy as can be. I would take these studies with a grain of salt. Every parent has their own ideas and methods and yes, we all just do the best we can.

And frankly, unless you’ve raised a child to adulthood, you can observe and yes, judge even though you say you aren’t. But you don’t have any experience. Or expertise on the subject of parenting. Come back in 18 years and give us your thoughts then.

Post # 61
Member
995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Are you sure he isn’t being…abused? That would be the first thing that would pop into my mind if a kid broke his arm for the 3rd time–then again I’ve dealt with a lot of dysfunctional families

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