(Closed) How being over-protective can physically hurt your kid

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
Post # 62
Member
995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@abbyful:  Also…your entire OP was about this individual kid, now you are telling people that they are losing sight of the big picture because you were making a social commentary…..

 

As far as this epidemic you speak of….I never really roughhoused when I was a kid and I’ve never broken a bone…I’ve known boys that were constanly biking/skateboarding/etc and broke bones all the time

Just because a study found a correlation does not mean that applies to the child in your example, or that it  is in any way an epidemic

Post # 64
Member
1733 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

View original reply
@KatyElle:  Maybe your daughter gets that feeling like her throat is coated I get that feeling with whole and 2% but skim and 1% don’t bother me.

op I was not allowed to eat junk or drink soda as a child and broke both my wrist stitches twice and bruises everywhere. 

Post # 65
Member
9816 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

View original reply
@Katnisseverdeen:  I think so too. She takes one sip and immediately gets this look of reproach like I just made her drink castor oil haha!

Post # 66
Member
1733 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

View original reply
@KatyElle:  I know how she feels it honestly feels like your throats closing in.

Post # 67
Member
2559 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

View original reply
@abbyful:  I can tell you though that any type of study, survey, etc. involving patients has to go through a multi-step approval process (involving psychologists, researchers/statisticians, etc.) to make sure the questions are not leading and will yield useful, accurate data.

Yeah, I’m in psych/health research, which is why I know you have to be extremely careful in how you interpret those data and would have liked to see the questions before I believed it 🙂

Post # 68
Member
2790 posts
Sugar bee
Since it applies here just as well as the other thread.

You cannot always research your way through life or parenting. Parenting is going to constantly test your limits and boundaries. I think it would be much more beneficial for your mental health as well as the well being of your child to stop worrying about what some scientific study says or about judging other people in the world and instead learn from these parents and others. Parenting is not an exact science. There may be studies out there but do you think your child would prefer to be treated like some rat in a lab or as a human being who makes mistakes but is allowed to grow and learn from them?

Post # 69
Member
1029 posts
Bumble bee

I was incredibly overprotected as a child, and as much as I appreciate my mom wanting me to be safe, I feel like it kept me from learning to take care of myself. I wasn’t allowed to leave the yard or ride my bike anywhere other than the cul-de-sac. I understand this for an 8 or 9 year old, but I was 15 at the time. Since I never really learned how to “share the road” when I was younger, driving terrified me and I didn’t end up getting my driver’s license until I was 21. I also found just going out and doing things by myself to be incredibly intimidating because I always either had everything done for me, or my mom helped me with everything.

I know this is what every child says about their parents, but that’s not how I’m doing it when it’s my turn to have kids. Yes, I want my kids to be safe, but it’s important to teach your kids to do the right thing and then trust them enough to do a few things by themselves because even if they get a few bumps and bruises as a child, this will hopefully save them for an adulthood of panic attacks over something as simple as going to the mall alone.

Post # 71
Member
510 posts
Busy bee

Wow… I’m surprised most of these responses are so harsh.  I’m sure at some point most people in this thread have seen parents act a certain way out in the community and thought to themselves ‘I would or wouldn’t do it that way, etc’  To say you’ve never thought that way about other parents is pretty ridiculous.  We’re all human. 

OP, I totally see your point.  I’m an elementary school counselor, and my colleagues that have been in the field for years talk all the time about how kids don’t really ‘play’ like they used to; with so many eletronic toys, etc kids expect to be entertained and stimulated all the time, rather than engaging in imaginitive play.  That’s a simplified way to describe the issue, but I agree there are definite changes in kids’ play, which in turn affects their development socially, emotionally and cognitively.  We also see a lot of ‘helicopter parents’ in our district, which kind of sounds like your neighbor’s approach. 

Post # 72
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

View original reply
@abbyful:  Drinking skim milk can actually give you more calcium than whole milk. While there are nutrients bound to fat in foods, calcium is not found in the fatty portion of milk. One cup of skim milk will have more calcium than one cup of whole milk as the skim milk is made up almost entirely of the calcium-containing portion.

Although the amount of fat in milk doesn’t affect the absorption of calcium, certain factors can impact how much calcium the body receives. Vitamin D, which is added to milk, is necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium. Also, taking a calcium supplement along with a glass of milk is not going to help the body get more calcium. Only so much calcium can be used at a time, so spread out dietary intake throughout the day.

 
 

Post # 73
Member
5669 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

This post really made me laugh, mainly because DH and I were talking about this the other night and saying if our daughter is anything like me I see many trips to the ER in our future. So my mother was a Stay-At-Home Mom and cooked every meal we ate from scratch. We were very healthy and active children. We ate right and played sports every season. However I still managed to break my arm every year from 1st-8th grade. I was just accident prone, ex falling down the stairs and the top of the monkey bars. This had no reflection on my parents at all!

Post # 74
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

View original reply
@mrstilly: As you pointed out, vitamin D is necessary for calcium absorption, and vitamin D is fat soluble. That’s the reason that fat is necessary to get the best use of the calcium in milk. It doesn’t matter how much calcium is contained in the milk if your body can’t use it efficiently.

Post # 75
Member
299 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

View original reply
@MsBrooklynA: Since it applies here just as well as the other thread. You cannot always research your way through life or parenting. Parenting is going to constantly test your limits and boundaries. I think it would be much more beneficial for your mental health as well as the well being of your child to stop worrying about what some scientific study says or about judging other people in the world and instead learn from these parents and others. Parenting is not an exact science. There may be studies out there but do you think your child would prefer to be treated like some rat in a lab or as a human being who makes mistakes but is allowed to grow and learn from them?

 

THIS!!! A million times THIS!

Post # 76
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

View original reply
@MsBrooklynA:  I think this is kind of a fine line. I think you should absolutely as a parent be informed, and question things. For some people, this means doing a ton of reading, for some people, this means talking to people anecdotally. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being informed & making parenting decisions based on your findings. Sure, don’t drive yourself crazy, but, really, there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to do things as “right” as you can, even though there will still be some trial & error involved. Also, I think it’s kind of silly that we, as a culture, look at young people and are horrified at the obesity & health problems and say “we need to do something!” but then also chastize parents who try “too hard” to be perfect. It’s silly. 

The topic ‘How being over-protective can physically hurt your kid’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors