How can you tell how old an antique ring is?

posted 2 years ago in Rings
Post # 17
Member
6273 posts
Bee Keeper

juniperbee :  thank you. My Darling Husband bought it for the OMC diamond with the plan to reset it into a simple solitaire which is what I wanted (with a plain band). But then I couldn’t bear to break up and antique and loved the hearts too. The baguettes were a bonus!

 

 

OP – I’ve done a bit of googling around your ring style. I thought it was a transitional diamond but you’re thinking OEC?  It seems everything I can find is putting it firmly in the 1930s bracket. Look forward to hearing what you can find out about it from knowledgeable people. 

Post # 18
Member
2758 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2007

I’d have guessed transitional too, though I’m pretty bad at that game! 

UK-bee :  Pretty sure no one is ever going to complain about seeing your beauty around here! 

Post # 20
Member
2758 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2007

juniperbee :  Transitional is the evolution of the OEC it was around in the 20’s before the modern round brilliant. 

Post # 21
Member
665 posts
Busy bee

juniperbee :  I know quite a bit about antique gems.outing myself as a major gen geek!  Mine is from the 1880’s and was my g-g-grandmas. My appraiser figured this out from the facetal patterns in the stone plus I knew it was passed down many times. Your stone if I’m not mistaken has a culet right? Little circle in the middle of the diamond from the point at the bottom? Mine too. Also your table facet is smaller than a modern cut I think from eyeballing it. It might be a Euro or old miners cut or some transitional brilliant hybrid. My guess is that it’s late Victorian/early Edwardian. If you are in chicago I know a really good appraiser who solved the mystery of my ring too!

Post # 22
Member
285 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Judging from the OEC, the openwork, and the 18K white gold, I’d guess 1930s for sure. It’s a gorgeous ring! How special that the side stones are also full OECs! Usually they are single cuts.

Post # 23
Member
6273 posts
Bee Keeper

juniperbee :  a transitional cut is an early modern cut. It sort of bridges the gap between the chunky cut by hand olds and the more brilliant cut moderns. 

A History of Transitional Diamonds

 

summerrain123 :  wow what an amazing heirloom. What did the jeweller say your cut was? It looks almost rose cut in that photo with such a huge flat crown. I’m thinking early OMC though?

Post # 24
Member
475 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Beautiful ring!!  I have an antique ering as well. I’m thinking 1930s too and I’m guessing your diamonds are OECs since the crown is rather high on that centre diamond. The crown is usually pretty low on transitionals. 

Post # 25
Member
2420 posts
Buzzing bee

I’d also guess 1930s for the ring.  I was originally thinking late OEC, but now I’m thinking it might be more (early) transitional, based on the table size.  Regardless, it’s a beautiful ring!

Post # 26
Member
665 posts
Busy bee

UK-bee :  thanks!!! It totally looks rose cut in that shot! But it’s a transitional brilliant. It began as a euro cut then it cracked and needed to be cut down on 2 occasions. The apprasiser figured this all out. the woman is a living legend so smart!  Here it looks more modern but they left the culet.

Post # 30
Member
665 posts
Busy bee

juniperbee :  thanks!!! She said it began as a Euro then was cut down twice finally becoming a transitional brilliant.

the appraiser is Lorraine Oakes owner of Chicago Gem Lab on Wabash in Chicago. Take that down just in case you can’t find someone by your city or if you visit chicago. She might accept insured shipped rings for appraisal then ship it back like a lot of the gem labs do. I dunno but she might. Or maybe you can convince her to set up a Skype or look at photos to just chat about the ring since she can’t appraise it in person. I would pay to hear her chat appraisal aside! 

My thoughts from your antique gem obsessed weddingbee friend Summer!!

 

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