(Closed) How did this happen? (Shirataki Noodles)

posted 6 years ago in Cooking
Post # 3
Member
1747 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’ve tried but I don’t think I patted them dry enough. I think Hungry Girl says a good way to cut down on the odd texture is to cut them with shears and make them even thinner.

I really want to be able to like them because I like the act of eating pasta with all kinds of sauces. Sigh.

Do you think frying would help? LOL.

Post # 5
Member
141 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

So not what you are asking, but have you tried spaghetti squash?  I love the texture and it and I feel good that I’m eating more veggies.

Post # 6
Member
675 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I second spaghetti squash or quinoa pasta. Has more protein than the same serving size as meat. 

Post # 7
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

If you boil them it helps.

I make a “stir fry” out of them with stirfry veggies at work and some meat with low sodium soy sauce. I can make enough for a few days with no effort.

I also like to make soups with them. Broth, lime juice, fish sauce, cilantro and chile oil… yum! Its a near calorie free snack (although high in sodium). Add veggies and leftover chicken for a good hearty bowl for lunch.

Post # 8
Member
1144 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@atalante:  Yes I actually like them. I make all kinds of things with them. I do not really like the fake meat though I am a vegetarian but I just don’t eat the soy meat it has a weird flavor.

Post # 9
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I haven’t tried them. But another pasta replacement I use is cutting zucchini and yellow squash into strips using a mandolin, then blanching for about 30 seconds.

This is what they looked like before blanching, so you can see the thickness I use:

 

Post # 11
Member
522 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@atalante:  I eat the spaghetti-like ones (only ones I have found where I live…) and just eat them like I would any plate of pasta. I usually just rinse them very thoroughly under the faucet and then let them drain in the colander for a little bit while making the sauce… and put them in the pasta sauce in the pan for a few minutes so they’ll pick up the flavour a bit.

I tried the dry frying pan thing… tasted the same to me as without cooking.

I am a pasta/carb addicted woman so this is such a good find for when i’m dieting, specially now before the wedding

Post # 12
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

@atalante:  Just rinse. The instructions on them suggest rinsing and boiling before serving/using. 

Post # 13
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is actually a grain, not a pasta. Well, technically it’s not a grain either, it’s related to chard and spinach; but at the grocery store it will be with the grains.

It looks kind of like bird seed millet. You’re most likely to find it in the natural food section. I use it interchangeably with rice. I’m not sure how good it would be in place of pasta since the size/texture is different, the only pasta I could see quinoa replacing would be couscous.

Post # 14
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

@abbyful:  But they do make some quinoa based pastas. They makea quinoa flour instead of a wheat flour.

Post # 15
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

We do the same thing as abbyful as a healthy pasta replacement. Sometimes I use my vegetable peeler and cut the squash into flat, thin strips instead of julienning them. Good both ways! I’ve also used shredded, sauteed cabbage as a pasta “replacement”. It tastes really good with red sauce & homemade sausage.

Post # 16
Member
1572 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

@abbyful: Wow! Great idea, must try it! 

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