(Closed) How difficult is it keeping a cat in an apartment?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
438 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Kittens are a lot easier to train than puppies IMO. I have 2 kitties at our apartment, they have plenty of room to run around. Potty training kittens is pretty simple- but expect some accidents. One you show them the litterbox and as long as it is clean and accessible they get the point after a little while. I’ve never had a cat not pick up on this. Make sure you have something that they ARE allowed to scratch on if they have claws, and possibly invest in some “soft paws” cat claw covers to avoid any damage to carpet in the apt or your furniture if you do not want to declaw. If you get a male kitten make sure he is fixed early on to prevent “spraying”. Good luck! I’ve had only great luck in having cats in an apt with me! 🙂

Post # 5
Member
4467 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I don’t think cats are difficult at all to keep in an apartment.  We have two cats in 550 square feet.  Cats should be indoor-only for their safety.  They use the litterbox, so they don’t need to go outside.

Personally, I prefer to adopt “older” cats (at least 1-2 years) since their personalities are already developed, not to mention that they are more in need of adoption than kittens.  Kittens can be a handful.

Post # 6
Member
693 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Well, I rescued my cat when he was about 1 yr, so I can’t speak to raising a kitten exactly, but I live in a condo (and I’ve had friends with 2 cats in an apartment), and there’s really nothing to it.  As far as I know, there’s actually not a lot of ‘training’ required.  The litter box is pretty much an instinct.  The only thing I advise is not to play with the kitten with your hands/feet directly (use a teaser toy).  If they don’t learn young that skin is off limits, they can play too rough when they’re older, and adult cat claws hurt!

Also, my sister got a puppy and raised him at my parents’ house before we both moved out, and yes, I can definitely vouch that cats are way easier. Cats don’t need to play as much and don’t need to be walked. 

Post # 7
Member
2894 posts
Sugar bee

Probably easier than having a dog since dogs need to be taken out frequently to use the restroom and get exercise. Most cats have plenty of space in an apartment setting and as the PP mentioned, so long as you have a clean litter box and show them where it is, they potty train quickly.

Post # 9
Member
11239 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Well, you don’t train cats, really. They pretty much know how to use a litterbox as it’s ingrained in them from domestication. Like pp said, you just have to show them the box and keep it clean.

That said, and I know that it’s different in the UK, but please don’t let your cat outside. Dometic cats are not outdoor creatures–too many bad things can happen to them.

SOME cats are cuddly. They are not and never will be as cuddly as dogs as a general rule. Dogs are people pleasers, cats are not.  

ETA: I don’t think that kittens are really that difficult. My little kitty was, but she’s got some serious abandonment issues, which meant that she spent her kittenhood crying through the night and bringing us toys at all hours. I’ve never had problems adopting either of my cats, but some places are very stringent–make sure you check out their rules and applications.

Post # 10
Member
693 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Oh, and DON’T go by the feeding amounts on the sides of dry food.  I gave my cat what was recommended and, well, he was no longer a thin kitty.  I would talk to your vet about food recommendations.

Post # 11
Member
2894 posts
Sugar bee

@OrchidsandCandles:  Need to be let out? I’ve never heard that before and I think whoever told you may have been mistaken. Don’t get me wrong, we’ve had outdoor cats before but we lived in an area where we could just leave the door open and them came and went as they pleased. But they still had a litter box that they would use when the doors were shut or during the winter. They really don’t need to be let out for anything.

Post # 13
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I think you can totally keep a cat in an apartment IF the apartment is big enough.  Cats are territorial and need some space to roam. 

What exactly do you mean by “train”? When we got our kittens 2 years ago, they were about 6 weeks old and already used the litter box like pros. As for listening when you say no, or coming when you call, cats do that if they feel like it, lol.  They won’t be obedient like dogs, but they will be very sociable and fairly well behaved if you spend enough time with them. The key to having a good cat is having a happy cat. Read up on cat behavior and cat body language. We did and now we have two well-adjusted kitties who we couldn’t love more.

Post # 14
Member
1318 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@OrchidsandCandles:  Personally, I would never let my cat out. She is an indoor cat and not equipped to be outside, in fact she hates going out!!! She amuses herself by running up and down the stairs and stalking bugs that manage to fly in. She’s never pooped or peed in the floor (although picking up puke is never fun and they all do that from time to time). She’s perfectly content and happy in an apartment. 

Post # 16
Member
1732 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

It’s not difficult at all!! I live in new york city, so my cat is 100% indoors. She does have access to our balcony which she only goes out to if we are sitting out there. There are different concerns of outdoor vs. indoor cats, but for her safety, we prefer to keep her as primarily indoors.

Our cat is very affectionate, but its usually on her schedule. She loves to sleep with us, but isn’t so much a lap cat. But she is the sweetest thing in the whole wide world. She’s awesome company.  I’m definitely a cat person, though. i’ve always preferred cats to dogs. 

We got her at the ASPCA and she was already fixed. She was only 12 weeks old, and she was already litter trained. I love the flexibility of cat vs. dog. We just went away for the weekend and we left her with a bowl of food and several bowls of water and she was fine. You’d never be able to do that with a dog. 

Also, we use soft paws on her as a PP mentioned. They are a god send. I wish we had discovered them sooner (because yes, our leather couch is quite scratched from her as a kitten – but we were prepared for that when we got a cat) I’ts a small price to pay.

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