(Closed) How do you QUIT??!?!!?

posted 8 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
2207 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

its difficult, but you have to do what is best for you.  Like you said, write a litter and give ample notice.  Sit your boss down and explain the situation and reason for having to leave.  Let them know it was a very difficult decision on your part, but it has to be done.  Then ask how you can make the transition easier for them in your time left.

I quit a job after a few years.  It was a large company, but upper management knew me and had plans.  all of my friends were there (and most of them still are.) I broke down and cried, but got through it.  Its SO difficult, but people move on all the time

Post # 4
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Are you leaving for a specific reason?  Do you have a new job with a particular start date?

Post # 5
Member
402 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

Do you already have something else lined up? Because, trust me, you do not want to be without a job and looking for one right now. (In fact, I am stalling going to the Unemployment office right now).

But, if you do, then give them plenty of time if you are that close. Etiquette says at least 2 weeks notice. Whenever I decided to move out of the state, I gave my boss 6 weeks notice to help him find a replacement. I was in the middle of several large projects, but I wanted to go back to school. He and I were close enough that there were no hard feelings, and he appreciated that I told him so far in advance. Also, I did it face to face, not in a letter. I did eventually have to type up a formal 2 week notice for HR, but he knew weeks in advance.

Post # 6
Member
2781 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Eh, its a different kettle of fish for me because I freelance. But I have handed in my notice to some jobs before and it’s always a bit hard. Actually I handed in my notice to the job where my FH was my boss (before we got engaged) and that was just weird. My advice is to write your letter of resignation and keep it really professional. Don’t let personal feelings get clouded into it and if they ask the reason keep it private. “There’s a lot of reasons and I’m not ready to disclose any of them yet” is a professional way to keep the peace. As they’re a company they’ll understand that sometimes people need to leave their work for whatever reason.

Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1194 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I would type up a 2 weeks notice letter and sit down and speak with them about quitting.  I always offered to assist with the end of any large projects I was working on until they found someone to fill my spot, which always seemed appreciated.

Building up and during my 2 final weeks, I would also focus a lot of time on putting together a “manual” for my position.  It would give detailed instructions on everything I did and how to do it.  I always find that no one, except for the person in the position, knows everything you do and I am sure the person coming in behind you would appreciate an explanation of what to expect.  I also always went through my emails and files and organized it all so that someone else would be able to comprehend and easily figure out my system.

When it comes down to it, you leaving might come as a surprise, but in business it happens.  If there are any hard feelings about you leaving, that just means that they don’t respect your need to grow and move on . . . It can happen, but if that’s the outcome, two weeks goes by much faster than you think.

Post # 8
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

I had such a hard time quitting my last job. It was a second job to supplement my better paying job, and it was just interfering with my school work. But because I had worked there for a year and there was a high turnover rate, it was weird. I really loved our head manager, and I had to quit to her… she asked me not to, and told me that if I missed it in a few months I should come back. I did have to type up a letter of resignation, etc, but that part wasn’t hard. It was weird leaving everyone… 

The really awkward part is that I gave my two weeks’ notice, and they scheduled me for the next three weeks. I worked it anyway, but was stunned that they’d do that. 

Besides that, I’ve quit other part-time jobs, but none that I had been so involved in as this one. 

Post # 9
Member
2015 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

I’ve quit twice! It’s always a little uncomfortable, but it can be easy if you’re prepared. Here are some things to consider:

1. Write up a resignation letter. Keep it simple. I would usually write something like, “It is with anticipation and regret that I submit my two-weeks notice as[position] at [company name]. I am very pleased with my experiences at [company name] will always appreciate the opportunities I was give here.”

2. E-mail/Call your boss and schedule a meeting and explain you need to discuss something with them.

3. Once at the meeting, just explain your situation. I was always pretty honest and just said, “A new opportunity came up, and after a lot of thoughtful consideration, I’ve decided to take it.” Explain that you’re willing to do whatever necessary to find a replacement and help get everything organized for your departure.

4. Some companies do exit interviews. Google it and prepare. I did one at my first job I left, and it wasn’t anything to get worked up over, it’s just good to have an idea of what to say.

5. So important: no matter how much you hated the job (if you did) leave on good terms. I’m sure you know this, but it can’t hurt to throw it out there! I HATED my first boss. She was awful and borderline emotionall-abusive. I didn’t say a word about it while in the process of leaving.

Hope that helps!

Post # 11
Member
5977 posts
Bee Keeper

Write them your resignation letter, and explain exactly what you told us in your second post. You appreciate all of the opportunity they gave you, but this position just fell into your lap. It gives you the opportunity to utilize your degree, and do what you’ve always dreamed of doing. Also let them know that the new position is closer to where you live, and it’s just much more adventageous for you to take that job right now. They’ll appreciate your honesty. It will be really hard, but they will respect you for letting them know.

Post # 13
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

I think so long as you’re very clear in your reasons for leaving – that it’s because your current job just can’t offer you what this new one will, and give them ample notice, there won’t be hard feelings.

It’s not them, it’s the nature of the position, and if your bosses are professionals they’ll understand and not hold it against you.  If you’re worried about the projects you’ve been assigned, you could offer to help recruit or train your replacement.

Post # 14
Member
2015 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

@MrsK2be: I know, it’s definitely hard! Even when you don’t like your job/boss, it’s never an easy thing to do.

BUT, like others have said, this is your career, and if you can use your degree in another position that really is better suited for you, I know your bosses would understand. If the time comes, just explain that it wasn’t planned, and the opportunity found you, and that you really thought long and hard before accepting the job. They can’t take it too personally because it really is just business. Just explain your heartfelt thanks for all the opportunities they gave you.

Post # 15
Member
3125 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

the way i imagine quitting is to gather my things, tip my desk over, flash people the peace sign and walk out.  then text all my friends to meet me at happy hour and have a great night. that’s what i’d recommend. that, or write a concise letter to your boss and give 2 weeks, whatever. 😉

Post # 16
Member
5399 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Quitting sucks, last time I quit it was kind of a nasty situation and that’s the only time I’ve ever done it.  As much as it does suck, though, think about how LUCKY you are that you found another job that you love!  I would personally love to be in your shoes (especially since I’m dying to quit my current job!)

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