(Closed) How long does conversion to Anglicanism usually take?

posted 8 years ago in Christian
Post # 3
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I grew up Episcopalian, and as far as I know, there really isn’t a “conversion process”.  If you were already baptized, you don’t need to go through that again, because unlike Catholicism where you need to be baptized Catholic in order to receive communion, anyone can recieve communion- even if you aren’t baptized.  You could choose to be confirmed by the Church- a process that takes several months of classes studying the bible, and learning the various creeds (Nicine creed)- the timeline of confirmation will vary by your particular parish and when the bishop is scheduled to visit your church, because the bishop is the only one who can confirm people in the Episcopal church, not a priest.  When I was confirmed, it was like one night a week + Sundays of classes.

Post # 4
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@kokuu: Catholicism does not require you to be “baptized Catholic.”  The Catholic Church recognizes all baptisms that have the proper matter (water) and the proper form (“… in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit…”).  Lutheran, Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, and most other protestants are considered to be baptized validly and do not need to be baptized (those protestants are considered to be partially members of the Catholic Church even if they don’t want to be).  The exception are the protestants that do not believe in the Holy Trinity the same as the rest of Christianity (Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons, specifically). Anyone not baptized would need to be baptized (including the above two mentioned denominations).

Unlike most protestants, Catholics only allow communion with other Catholics and with the schismatic churches that have the same believes as the Catholic Church (Eastern Orthodox, Assyrian, Oriental, and old Catholic such as the Polish Catholic Church).  This is for two reasons:  first, Catholics view the Eucharist as actually the Body of Christ (while many protestants view it as a symbol).  Thus receiving the Eucharist is a more significant event in the Catholic Church than in most protestant churches.  Second because even if you are allowed to do so, you shouldn’t accept communion in a church where you do not believe the same thing as that church.  Accepting communion is an act that says that you believe in everything that particular church believes in.  For that reason, it would be inappropriate for an Episcopalian to receive communion in a Catholic church.  For the same reason, a Catholic should not accept communion in an Episcopalian church, even if the Episcopalians allow her to do so. 

I know you didn’t ask for a lesson on Catholicism, but there were some issues in the PP that needed to be corrected.  I’m sure others would do the same for their own beliefs.  

Post # 5
Member
75 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I also grew up in the Episcopal Church, you do need to be baptized in the Christian Faith, but not necessarily as an Episcopalian, to receive communion but you can receive a blessing from clergy during communion if you are not baptized.  The clergy doesn’t really check your credentials though so it is a bit more of a personal decision but definitely agree with Coffeehound and I have always chosen not to receive communion while attending other services.

As an adult converting there are often Bible Study Classes or some form of adult Confirmation classes that priests welcome people to take if members wish to but often you can join a congregation at any point, it is best to ask a priest at the parish/congregation you are wishing to join. 

Episcopalians are part of CLEM – Catholic, Lutheran, Episcopal, and Methodist.  Catholics often prefer to receive a blessing at communion during Lutheran, Episcopalian, and Methodist services but my understanding of the interfaith CLEM agreement was that Catholics were welcome to receive communion if they wished.  Lutherans, Episcopalians, and Methodists can receive blessings during Catholic Mass. 

 

Post # 6
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@CoffeeHound: My appologies.  I didn’t realize that it was wasn’t necessary to be Catholic in order to receive communion at Catholic Mass, only baptized.  I’ve been to a quite a few Catholic services (my Uncle is Catholic) and my family has always refrained from taking communion during Catholic Mass, whereas whenever we would attend my Grandmother’s church (Lutheran) we would always go up for communion. I was always under the impression that one had to be baptized as a Catholic in order to receive communion (my aunt, the wife of my uncle also obtains from communion, because she was Baptized Episcopalian and never converted.

I grew up in a very liberal Church, and my priest always added the line, “Everyone is welcome to recieve the holy communion”

It would seem Episcopalians and Catholics would have very similar “rules” about things, considering how very similar their beliefs and services are (the primary differences are Nicene Creed vs. Apostle’s Creed and the Catholic version of the Lord’s Prayer does not include “For thine is the kingdom…”

Post # 7
Member
1093 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: Private home

Interesting note, Anglicanism and Episcopalian are no longer the same church.  There was a major schism last year over the issue of allowing gay members into the clergy.  Anglicanism is much closer to Catholicism, but Epicopalianism is also known as Catholic lite – all the pagentry, none of the guilt.  It’s not really a conversion so much as a confirmation of your new faith.  It can take a few months if you do the full confirmation class, but if you’re planning to get married in the episcopal church, you don’t need to be Episcopalian to do it!.

Post # 8
Member
1418 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I am Anglican, and in my church, any baptized Christian is welcome to receive the communion. I think as long as you believe and practice in the Anglican faith, you will be welcomed.  I would just talk to the minister and start attending regularly, if that is what you want.  If you would like to be confirmed, talk to the minister of the church and he/she will be able to tell you what you need to do.  I had to attend several classes at the church in the few months before my confirmation and then the confirmation service itself was performed when the bishop was visiting our church.

Post # 9
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@kokuu: “(the primary differences are Nicene Creed vs. Apostle’s Creed and the Catholic version of the Lord’s Prayer does not include “For thine is the kingdom…””

Those are actually not differences.  Both Catholics and Anglicans accept both the Nicene Creed and the Apostles’ Creed. In the Catholic Mass, either can be said and it’s entirely at the priest’s discression (usually the Nicene is used, since it is more detailed).

Also, Catholics do say the Doxology “For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are Yours, now and forever.”  The thing is, that’s not part of the Lord’s Prayer and never has been (a quick glance of the Bible shows that).  It’s a separate prayer/response that’s perfectly acceptable to add, but is not required.  So when simply reciting the Lord’s Prayer it is normally omitted.  However when the prayer is said within the Mass, it is included (after the Lord’s Prayer).

The major difference between Anglicans and Catholics had to do with control of the Church. Henry VIII believed that the King of England should have the final authority in all religious matters (thus concentrating all power – religious and legal – with the King), and so he rejected the pope’s authority and founded his own church.  The Episcopal Church developed because Anglican ministers were required to pledge allegiance to the King of England, and following the Revoluationary War, American Anglican ministers refused to do that and started their own church. 

But the churches (Anglican and Catholic) are very similar.  In fact, the pope instituted an “express line” (sort of) for Anglicans that want to become Catholic.  It can be done very quickly.

Post # 10
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@CoffeeHound: I guess that it’s just been my experience that every Catholic Mass I’ve ever been to (I usually went to one or two a year growing up) always used the Apostle Creed and always omitted the “For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are Yours, now and forever.”  I learned the Apostle creed in my confirmation class but we never ever use it in an Episcopalian service- always the Nicene creed.  I always found that those two parts of the service always “tripped me up”, so to speak when visiting a Catholic church, since prety much the rest of the service is identical. 

Post # 11
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@kokuu: You’re not in the US, are you?  Canada, maybe?

In the US, the Nicene creed is always said at Mass unless there’s a special event (like a Baptism) where renewal of Baptism is used.  In Canada, the Apostles Creed is used (and that always trips me up as well).

As for the Doxology, that’s always said in the US (and I remember it in Canada but I don’t have a copy of a Canadian Missal).  It does like this:

 

Priest:  Let us pray with confidence to the Father in the words our Savior gave us.

Congregation:  Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

Priest:  Deliver us, Lord, from every evil, and grant us peace in our day. In your mercy keep us free from sin and protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope for the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Congregation:  For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are Yours, now and forever.

 

The first line (from the priest) is just narrative, the second line (from the congregation) is the Lord’s Prayer, the third line (from the priest) is a separate prayer to the Lord, and the last line (from the congregation) is the Doxology that ends the collective prayer.  The Church has done the Lord’s Prayer this way back to the 300’s.  Somewhere in the Reformation, protestants dropped the priest’s part and attached the Doxology immediately to the end of the Lord’s Prayer, making it part of the prayer.  I haven’t seen anything that explains why that was done, but I suspect it’s part of the “priesthood of believers” philosophy that says everyone is a priest, so the officiant of the worship service shouldn’t have a special part (which was removed).  The new combined congregation part was then considered to be the Lord’s Prayer. 


I feel like I should stop hijacking and give info more relevent to the OP.

First of all, the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church are not necessarily the same thing.   There’s an overall Anglican Communion which is a collection of churches that are in communion with the Archbishop of Canterbury (the Anglican version of the pope).  The Anglican Church in England is the “mother church” of the Anglican Communion (much like the Roman Catholic Church is the mother church of the Catholic Church) but there are many others. 

One of those is the Episcopal Church in the US.  The Episcopal Church formed following the American Revolution.  One requirement to be a bishop in the Anglican Church (in the 1780’s called the Church of England) was (maybe still is) that you pledge allegiance to the monarch of the United Kingdom (which is why Anglicans split from Catholics originally).  Since American bishops did not want to do that, they formed their own church (the Episcopal Church) that was separate but in communion with the Church of England.

Practically, the Anglican Church and Episcopal Church have some differences.  For example, the Episcopalians in the US ordain women to the priesthood while most other churches in the Anglican Communion denounce this practice (in fact the current head of the Episcopal Church in the US is a woman).  Also, the Episcopal Church in the US ordains homosexuals while most other churches in the Anglican Communion denounce this practice.

To join, there’s a good resource here: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/documents/confirmation.pdf It says that if you’ve already been baptized, all you really need to do is have you baptism recorded by the Episcopal Church.  You are expected at some point to receive Confirmation, but if you have already been confirmed at another church, you can be “received” instead of confirmed.  I’ve known a few people that joined and went through the Confirmation process and it took about 6 months (but, again, you’re a member as soon as your baptism is recorded).  I hope that helps.

Post # 13
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@shaunna: I was baptized Catholic, but now attend an Anglican church. My Fiance attends with me but he is unbaptized. Our minister told us that the process of baptism is a bit longer for an adult than for a child, but that it would only take a couple of months. For example, she said they hold adult baptism at Easter, and he would have to start the process around January.

Post # 15
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@shaunna: I just want to point out that the only reason it takes a long time to become a Catholic is because the Church requires you to be educated enough to know that you’re making the right decision.  If you walk into a priest’s office and can convince him that you know everything you need to know about Catholicism, he can baptize you on the spot.  In fact, many Eastern Orthdox are able to convert in a single day.

 

Post # 15
Member
1 posts
Wannabee

As a recovered Catholic, it all always sounded ike a bunch of made up malarkey to me. I’ll save my time and money and sleep in soundly on Sunday mornings. 

The topic ‘How long does conversion to Anglicanism usually take?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors