(Closed) How many people opt for a C-section over labor?

posted 9 years ago in Babies
Post # 32
Member
289 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@Jenn23:I completely do NOT believe that whole not bonding thing. They base it on not as much oxytocin being released, but there is no real evidence that it effects bonding, and as others have said bonding begins before birth. It did freak me out enough to research it though.

Also, I also had a fibroid removed and worried about its effects on future pregnancies. I had it done by robotic laparoscopic myomectomy. There were four 1-inch incisions made and recovery was not terrible. My fibroid was the size of a 5-month fetus when removed and was growing on a stalk outside of my uterus.

Originally my doctor said C-sections would likely be necessary, but afterwards he said they would not. A lot of people have vaginal births after C-sections, so I wouldn’t give up yet, if that’s what you want.

Post # 33
Member
684 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2009

@ladyox: OK I have to say I laughed at the “total loss of dignity” thing. I dont think she meant it litterally but I do remember when I had my baby, more people saw my hoo-ha then the average hooker! And by the end of everything I didn’t even care anymore who saw! I used to be a very conservative person before I had a baby. Thats what having a baby will do to ya. Now THATS the miracle of child birth! HAHA!

Post # 34
Member
3613 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I had a myomectomy to remove a fibroid before, which means my uterus was already opened and cut into and it would be risky for me to give natural birth. I’ll need to have a c-section if we have a baby. Don’t know if that’s what I would have chosen but it doesn’t bother me, I’m just glad I’m still able to give birth.

Post # 35
Member
3613 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

@Jenn23: I just read your post and we basically wrote the same thing 🙂 Best of your luck with your surgery. I had this done 1.5 years ago so let me know if you have any questions about anything.

Post # 36
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I think the problem is that because C-Sections are so common in our country and you can usually be awake during the procedure, people don’t realize that it is MAJOR surgery with it’s own issues and complications.

I am going to do everything I can to prevent one, including having natural childbrith. Any medical internvention increases the odds of a C-Section, from internal exams, to epidurals, to being induced. Everyone I know who’s had a C-Section said that they wish they hadn’t needed one. The hospitals around where I live won’t allow you to choose a C-Section, but for “big” babies, going past the due date, and things like that they are eager to opt for it.

I watched the business of being born as well, and have read many books. I don’t think that a C-Section prevents bonding, but I think there are documented links about it delaying the initial bonding from skin to skin contact after birth and it can make breastfeeding a little harder intially. I think they are both easily overcome though with a little effort after you start to recover.

Post # 37
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

@retsud: I have about 15 fibroids and I’m having the abdominal myomectomy, not laproscopic like you had.  My largest is 10 cm (softball size!) and two others are 8 cm. It’s a 4-6 week recovery.  It is definitely not possible to have a vaginal birth.  🙁  My uterus could rupture. I will have to be scheduled for a c-section around 38 weeks or so and if I were to go into labor, they would immediately get me ready for a c-section.   Interesting about the oxytocin. I’m going to look into it out of curiousity. Thanks for all the information!

 

@meliss: Thank you so much. I’m nervous!  I just want to get it over with now! 🙂  I may PM you to ask for recovery tips on managing the pain.  I agree with you, too, that I’ll be happy just to be able to have a baby and give birth!

Post # 38
Member
2394 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

I absolutely don’t believe that a c section prevents bonding.  Those nine months in the womb are somehow less important than five seconds post birth?  Pffft.

Having said that, I would much prefer to give birth with a midwife or a doula specifically to avoid a c section.  As posters above me noted, so much of the typical hospital experience makes it difficult for laboring women to do what comes naturally (sit up, walk around, birth in water), etc.  Of course, if I were to have a dangerous pregnancy, or fall into a high risk category, I would likely change my mind, and it’s important to be in contact with an OB-GYN and thoroughly vet a midwife’s credentials if you do go the homebirth route.  Someone with whom she’s connected needs to have admitting privileges at a hospital in case of an emergency.

Post # 39
Member
289 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@Jenn23:No problem. Tough deal on the fibroids! I definitely lucked out. Although mine was very large, I’ve only had the one and it was placed in a convenient way.

Post # 40
Member
633 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I don’t want to get into a huge debate on my views on this subject bc it can be rather controversial, but for me personally, I would hope to avoid a C-section at all costs. My goal is to deliver with a midwife in a birthing center connected to a hospital. I may feel this way because my mom had me at home with a midwife & loved her experience. This was back in the 80s, and after she had already given birth to my brother in a hospital and had a horrible experience, being bullied into taking pain meds she didn’t want. If you read the studies, hospitals in the US are much quicker to induce when not necessary, which is more painful and which leads to c-sections. Epidurals often slow birth and also necessitate inductions which means more painful labor, too!

I don’t care what choice people make, but I say educate yourself fully. C section is MAJOR surgery. Why willingly put yourself through it?

I suggest the book “Pushed” by Jennifer Block for more info on the c-section debate and US birthing situation.

Post # 41
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@maggierose:  I was born at home in the 80’s, too.  My younger sisters were also!

Post # 42
Member
289 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@maggierose: i like your plan. home births scare me because of all the things that could go wrong, so I always thought the birthing center was a good alternative. Water also calms me a lot, so I always liked the option of soaking (not delivering). Of course, with my history (see above), I really want my doctor there. It seems like hospitals are getting more open to alternatives these days.

I think what you said is the right approach – be informed and be ready to be assertive about what you want. It’s easy to let a doctor take over completely. And don’t let anyone guilt you about any of your decisions. Mommying is not a competition!

Post # 43
Member
636 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

@Jenn23:  I just wanted to send good thoughts your way! I had 2 large ovarian cysts removed (1 was the size of a grapefruit) a few years ago through an abdominal laparotomy. I know how scary it is to be faced with that surgery, but just have faith that you will be fine!

My big advice would be to make sure you have someone around who can help you up out of bed the first few days after you get home…it’s not an easy thing. Good luck!

Post # 44
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

@cleve_girl01: Thank you!! I’m glad you made it thru your surgery OK! I know, the recovery is going to be just ‘lovely’. My husband will be there to help me, though. I don’t think I’ve ever been so worried in my life. If we didn’t choose this surgery, we could miscarry again (I miscarried in July), but the surgery has risks. Yikes! I wish I had known I had the fibroids before we got pregnant in June and then miscarried. I had absolutely NO idea I had them. Thanks for the advice!

 

 

 

 

Post # 45
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

I don’t know anyone that has chosen to have a c section although I know many people who have ended up having them after long, unsuccesful labors.  I agree that some docs probably rush to them, but many also respect a woman’s wishes and only perform them when necessary (such as my friend who pushed for 4 hours, had a vacuum and THEN had a c section when all else failed).

My baby was breech, the external version attempt to turn him was unsuccessful. so I had a scheduled c-section.  Yes it is major surgery BUT it was not that bad.  The pain was quite low, the recovery much better than expected, and the bonding…seriously??  ….don’t worry about that AT ALL! 

Post # 46
Member
792 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

About the bonding thing- I had a totally drug-free homebirth… 53 hours of labor. When my baby was born I was just so dang wiped out to feel anything other than relief that it was over. Sure, I kissed him, I loved on him, but I didn’t really “fall in love” with him until a few days later when I finally felt like myself again. No matter how you give birth it may take a little while until you feel the bond.

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