How much should I request as a raise?

posted 1 month ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
192 posts
Blushing bee

Ask for the higher number. I provided my office with comparables of other associates at small firms in the same area/city (I have a lot of friends who are VERY open with their contracts). I got a 17% raise. They are still underpaying me haha. I like my office culture, the people, that there are not expectations I work weekends unless absolutely necessary. 

Make sure you take note all year of things you have done that benefitted your company (financially or otherwise). Tell them why you are worth more! 

Post # 3
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee

Definitely the higher number. Bring your research if you need to justify it. 

Post # 4
Member
655 posts
Busy bee

When you ask for raise, I would also bring up concrete accomplishments to justify that you deserve it (not saying you don’t, but in my experience big raises rarely happen). My husband compiled a list of his accomplishments over 2 years with his company and asked for 12% (he was extremely underpaid). They ended up giving him 8% but I think when your boss who is in charge of the raises sees the numbers of what you accomplished they’ll feel better about the raise. Also probably not a bad idea to mention “according to my research my market value is X. Given that I’ve accomplished A, B, and C blah blah”

Post # 6
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee

I don’t think it is, especially if you’re actually on the low end of the scale. 

One reason why men are paid higher than women (outside of gender gap) is because they take risks in asking for what they think they are worth. Between starting salaries and raises, they will generally ask for more, while women ask for and settle for less. 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/04/women-are-still-not-asking-for-pay-rises-here-s-why/

Post # 8
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

I’m terrible about asking for raises and if I do its maybe 2-3% which isn’t too much in the grande scheme. At least, not enough to notice an impact on my future paychecks. 

Bouncing of other PP, would it be appropriate to push for 10% and provide the research you’ve compiled? I only suggest this because if you ask for 10%, they say no then the middle ground could be that 7% that you want, or even 8%! This of course is based on how comfortable you feel asking for 10%, you are the best judge of your workplace to know if this is an okay request. 

ETA: Noting you are on the lower-end of the pay scale for your position and profession, I don’t see the harm in going for the 10% knowing they will most likely come back with a counter for that 7% range. However, since it is a 5% increase from the previous raise, that is why I recommend having the reasearch on hand to provide to them. 

Post # 9
Member
192 posts
Blushing bee

NikkiBee18 :  

It all depends on what the range in your area is. I had a few meetings with my bosses.

Meeting 1: Did I want salary or commission? I said I would like to see options for both. I provided them with compensation packages from 9 other firms around our size.

Meeting 2: They told me they didn’t like to pay commission (because I would make a killing – they said I would be less motivated to accept mentorship). They gave me a salary offer. It was a raise of 12%.

Meeting 3: I countered and asked for 23%. I brought all the details of what I had done that year, how much money I had made them (most people in our field are paid between 35-50% of what they bring in). They were flabbergasted and said they thought they had made an extremely generous offer.

Meeting 4: They offered 17% and I took it. The raise is 37% of what I brought in last year. I am likely to bring in more this year because my billable rates have increased. I know I’m on the low end, but there are a lot of perks that I like at this job (as mentioned before – working weekends rarely, being encouraged to have a life outside of work, incredible mentorship).

 

Post # 11
Member
192 posts
Blushing bee

NikkiBee18 :

I am sure there are targets and quotas of some sort?

In addition to sales I listed all the community volunteer events I had worked to promote the company/pro bono work I did. I also listed all the networking evenings I had attended (which have value, if not quite $$$). I brought in emails from clients thanking me for my work. I was head hunted by four companies last year (all more money, less mentorship/lifestyle) and advised them of that.

  

Post # 14
Member
2411 posts
Buzzing bee

I don’t know your industry, but askng for 7% seems high to me.  Keep in mind that across industries the average raise is around 3%.   

Is it the norm in your industry or at your workplace to flat out ask for a specific raise as part of your self-assessment for your annual review?  I’m a manager and that would get some raised eyebrows from me!

Post # 15
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

NikkiBee18 :  If your boss is newer, I still reiterate bringing in the research and recommendations of a job well done as per minnewanka :  advice and go for the 10% OR could you write down a blanket 8-10% and if they question it, that’s when you would offer up asking for only 7%. 

Its honestly pretty nice that most people are hush-hush about what they make with your company. Darling Husband works in a labor job and mostly all of the guys there are paid differently for a variety of reasons and it causes A LOT of tensions like the “Well idk why Joe is getting paid XYZ and I’m only getting paid ABC and I do more.” My workplace keeps salaries on the DL between HR/hiring manager/manager, etc and it makes for a much nicer work environment. 

 

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