(Closed) How to address the envelope?

posted 8 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Mr. Uncle Last Name, Esq. and Ms. Aunt Last Name.

Post # 4
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Oh, I’m sorry, I didn’t realize your aunt was a lawyer as well!

I think it would just be:

The Esquires, Mr. Uncle Last Name and Ms. Aunt Last Name

or

Mr. Uncle Last Name, Esq. and Ms. Aunt Last Name, Esq.

Post # 5
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Doing a little more research for you, and I think you can leave off the Mr. and Ms. if you want.

Post # 6
Member
566 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Wouldn’t the Aunt also have Esq. if she is also a lawyer?

Or you can do what I did, and eliminate titles altogether 🙂 John Doe and Jane Smith.

Post # 8
Member
1695 posts
Bumble bee

Lawyers in the United States affect the title “Esquire”, which is abbreviate “Esq.” It is equivalent in most ways to “Mr.” so it is used instead of “Mr.” and never combined with “Mr.” In fact, it is a proper title for any high-ranking-but-untitled gentleman, but in the U.S. it has become so associated with lawyers that, on the one hand, few other gentlemen affect it; and on the other hand many ladies of that profession affect it (taking it as a professional title rather than a simple male honorific).

Now, properly speaking, professional titles are not supposed to be used in social correspondence, which is why medical doctors are the only doctors who are supposed to be addressed as “Doctor”. By proper form, then, your Auntie and Uncle would be simply “Mr Smith and Ms Jones” (on the inside address, and “Mr John Smith and Ms Jane Jones” on the outside address).

But try convincing a PhD of that rule! People like their professional titles and want to flaunt what they have earned, And the prevailing rule is that you are supposed to address people by the names and titles that they prefer for themselves. So, if you suspect that your Auntie and Uncle take pride in displaying their lawyerly credentials, do use “Esq.” as “John Smith, Esq. and Jane Jone Esq.” Don’t use “the Esquires …” — that is not in any way a traditional form and it creates too much cognitive disjunction, sounding more like a firm of ambulance-chasers than something respectable.

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