(Closed) How to approach this coworker issue? (sorry long!)

posted 7 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
1664 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I guess I’m sort of confused.  Are you at a job where you are normally scheduled to work weekends, but occassionally need a weekend off?  Are the holidays and weekends that she asks off during times when she is regularly scheduled?

I think that if something happens and this woman doesn’t come in when she says she will, you should approach your boss.  I also wouldn’t cover any of her shifts, or do her any favors. 

If it bothers you,maybe you should suggest that holidays off should be rotating, or in order of seniority or whatever system they are supposed to have.

Post # 4
Member
46402 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I think it’s time for a staff meeting on this issue alone. While this woman may hev been hired with the condition that she not work weekends, nothing in life stays the same forever.

I don’t think it is reasonable any longer for her not to have to work her share of weekends.

The issue of her not paying back trades is easy. If  one employee asks another to cover a shift, it must be a trade-shift for shift, in other words.

If I work Saturday for you, you work Wednesday for me and both halves of the trade must be written down on the original request.

Post # 6
Member
1664 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Oh, I don’t know then… If I got hired somewhere and was told that my schedule was M-F or something, I wouldn’t expect to work weekends, and I wouldn’t feel obligated to work them for anyone else, to be honest.

Post # 7
Member
2522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@EleanorRigby:  I agree.  It’s unfortunate that has happened.  It sounds like they need to hire more people to rotate the schedule around.  I also would be quite upset being told that I need to work a shift that I didn’t agree to when I hired in.  BUT, for her to ask for shifts off and not reciprocate–well that’s crappy and frankly, I would refuse to take her shifts for her from now on.  See how she likes it.

Post # 9
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2000

I agree that if I were hired with the promise that I would have week-ends and holidays off, I wouldn’t feel obligated to work them, either.

But, if I were that person’s co-worker, I wouldn’t feel obligated to cover any of her shifts for her, either.

The problem hiring more people is that the people who are there now would get fewer hours, so smaller paychecks.

What really needs to happen (and I’ve worked where this exact thing has happened) is that your boss needs to sit her down and explain that the boss who made that promise no longer works there and that he/she simply cannot honor it and run the store efficiently. And then, ask her how she wants to handle it (start working week-ends/holidays like everyone else or resign altho she cannot say the word resign to her)

Post # 10
Member
1737 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

This is a tricky situation simply because a mistake was made 5 years ago in allowing her such leeway in the first place.  Bascially, a strong-minded manager should take ehehr aside and explain that while her original hiring stipulations allowed for such lenient scheduling, changes have been made in the hiring and shceduling practices making it no longer feasible to allow her every weekend off.  This is a recession, and if she can’t accept that the company will need to revise her allowences, then she’s welcome to find other employment and they can hire someone without 5 years of possible pay increases to cover (they can probaby get a new person who will work weekends just fine for a cheaper salary).

If the compnay has changed hiring to have fewer people on the books, then she should be asked to work at least one weekend a month, maybe two.  That would still allow her 2-3 off, and would also give the other employees a little more flexbility when scheduling their own work/off times.

You manager should understand that this preferntial treatment only breeds anger in the other workers, and angry workers are not always able to focus on the tasks at hand. 

 

Post # 11
Member
2522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@SweetRose2011:  Yeah, if there were policy changes to the position and they were met with contractual changes then yes, she should have to change. I think your boss and his/her boss are the only ones that can really do anything about this.  As for you, I’d never take her shifts again or help her out.  Seriously, I know that sounds vindicative but why should you go out of your way to help her anymore?  Also, for her blowing up, if she were my employee, I’d terminate her on the spot for that kind of behavior.

Post # 13
Member
46402 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

There are many bees on this board who work various shifts. Many of us have undergone wholesale shift rotation changes at several times in our career.

Just because this woman was hired 5 yrs ago for Mon-Fri shifts, at a different store by a different manager, doesn’t mean she gets to keep that schedule the rest of her life.

Have a talk with your present boss. Ask for a review of the current policy. If it doesn’t happen, start a petition amongst the staff asking for a review.

Immediately and henceforth, do not work any of her requested trades.

The topic ‘How to approach this coworker issue? (sorry long!)’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors