(Closed) How to choose a diamond… in my humble opinion :)

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
1595 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Just want to add a coouple of things, you can really get a good value in the H color range…flourescence only negatively affects about 2% of all diamonds and is a GREAT way to save money on a stone–also combats the warmth of say a J color diamond. *TBH, you should check out the pricescope message boards, most of these “experts” buy stones with flourescence πŸ™‚

Use the Holloway cut advisor tool to your advantage! Especially when buying diamonds online, site unseen in person. Measurements that are most accurate are those graded by GIA and AGS. With EGL, color is most accurate if buying a stone from an EGL-USA certification vs EGL International…

http://www.pricescope.com/tools/hca/

Post # 4
Member
913 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Many people find even lower colors, down to an I or J, still face up white for a lot less money. Also, there are clean SI2’s, but you do have to be more careful about vetting them. I’m not understanding what you’re saying about your diamond facing up larger because it has a larger table. The table is the top plane of the stone, not the stone’s diameter. That’s like saying your dining table is larger when you put a larger plate on it.

 I would never buy an expensive diamond without a certificate from GIA or AGS. EGL stones aren’t cheaper because the lab is less popular. They are cheaper because the lab is dramatically laxer in grading than GIA and AGS. What EGL calls an H VS2, GIA might call a K SI1. So you should never pay anywhere close to the same amount for an EGL stone as you would a GIA stone with the same nominal specs.

I STRONGLY disagree about fluorescence. In most stones with fluorescence, far from causing a milky appearance, it actually gives them a boost that helps them face up whiter in natural light. Fluorescence is awesome! 1) it makes a stone appear whiter, which means you could potentially go down a grade or two in color, saving a ton of money and 2) for some reason it’s still considered undesirable in stones, so diamonds with fluorescence are cheaper than those without.

 

Post # 5
Member
544 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

My fiance found out the hard way about retail store diamonds. He purchased a ring for a failed relationship right from a retail jewelry case, they gave him a good deal ($5.5k for a $7.5k retail priced ring). Beyond the fact that the ring was purchased due to an ultimatum from the girl who at the same time was giving the same ultimatum to another guy, the worst part was when he went to try to get some money for the diamond and the ring itself, no one would buy the diamond. It was a nice setting, but the 1 ct center stone was worthless.

Granted, the hope is that you never have to sell your engagement ring, but it’s at least worth it to know you’re spending money on a diamond that is resellable if something happens down the line (upgrading a ring, financial issues, etc.).  When he bought mine he picked the setting he liked and then searched for a diamond that was quality, just to make sure this time around it was a sound investment.

Post # 8
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

Fluorescence can be pretty sometimes. My center diamond has it. I can only tell in certain lighting, and even then I love it. To me, it looks like those bluish diamonds you’d see in a movie or something. The quality of my diamond is really good overall, though, so in real life it sparkles and looks super nice. I get tons of compliments on it. One friend even said it looks like a J-Lo ring, haha. Ideal cut and clarity, as you’ve discussed, are the most important Cs, in my opinion. 

Post # 9
Member
113 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I love antique rings, so that is what I have.  I chose the ring because of the overall beauty and design.  There was a second favorite, that cost about the same, but had a bigger diamond.  I was tempted to go for it for the bigger diamond, but at the end of the day so happy we chose this one for its overall beauty.  This ring was meant for me πŸ™‚

Post # 10
Member
4804 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@kimberlyr22:  Re-selling diamonds never gets you your money back regardless of where they’re from.  They’re usually like new cars, once you drive them off the lot they go down in value.  I’ve never seen someone sell a ring for what they paid for it.

Let’s not all hate on retail store diamonds.  Mine is from there…and I love it πŸ™‚  Also, I know about the 4C’s and I CHOSE a diamond with lower clarity.  The price drop was worth it to me for the flaw that I have to look so close to see.

Post # 11
Member
913 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@mdoodles:  The jewelers are either lying or just misinformed about fluorescence. My stone has medium blue fluorescence and it is not milky in the slightest.

Can a fluorescent diamond appear milky, yes. Will fluorescence always (or even usually) equal milkiness, absolutely not.

Post # 12
Member
1595 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@MademoiselleL:  actuallyyyy, reselling a diamond will get you your money back and then some if you buy them pre-owned without a middle man and are smart!

I feel like I literally know anything and everything about diamonds…including that fluorescence only negatively affects about 2% of diamonds that have it, and the only reason they are priced lower is because of this unfounded “fear” that all diamonds with fluorescence have that milky look…why do jewelers tell you this isn’t true?!- always comes down to the bottom line, they are out to make a profit and want you to spend more!!!!!

BTW- people used to pay more back in the day for a diamond with fluorescence, research it!!

Post # 13
Member
402 posts
Helper bee

Fluorescence* 

 

Post # 16
Member
183 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Dell79:  Yes, there is a chance you can make money on a used diamond if you buy smart. However, the way you would likely do this is to buy it from someone else who needs to get rid of it for a very low price because they can’t get any more for it. This still doesn’t disprove the fact that diamonds hold a terribly low percent of their supposed “worth”. Basically, the only way you can avoid losing money on a diamond is to buy used and benefit from someone else losing their money on it. You may make money on it if you go to sell it again, but you still won’t get anywhere near the “worth” of what a new stone would cost. Also, how do you 100% ensure you aren’t the loser in the deal when you go to sell it the way the person you bought it from was? 

I’m not saying there is no way to make money or sell a diamond for what you paid; it’s just very rare. IMO it isn’t a great idea to buy a diamond with the intention of reselling it (unless you do get an amazing deal) because you likely won’t. Diamonds just aren’t a sound investment if you look at it from a strickly financial/resell standpoint. I would only buy a diamond if I planned to keep it forever. 

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