(Closed) How to design your own invitation in Word or Photoshop?

posted 6 years ago in DIY
Post # 3
Member
822 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Word is not ideal if you want to use anything more than just text.

Photoshop won’t work either since PS rasterizes the graphics.  You will see a lot of invitation printers who require high quality PDFs created by Adobe InDesign or Adobe Illustrator.

i started my invites in photoshop and then figured this out so I had to learn Illustrator and InDesign.  I had to pull my vector graphic into Illustrator to change the colors and edit it.  I then did the layout in InDesign.

If you don’t have either programs, I know some printers will accept files created in Microsoft Publisher.  I used InDesign because I wanted to get the bleed and crop marks that the printer requested and I also wanted the ability to choose my glyphs (I used a font with alternative glyphs so I could manually go in and pick out which version of a swashy swooshy character looked best.

Oh and you also want to make sure you create your invites with the proper color format that the printer requests.  Most I found wanted CMYK. I think Photoshops uses RGB color?

Post # 4
Member
5296 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

If you don’t have something like InDesign, Publisher is a great option for something more simple – but I know it only did RGB for me, which led to us printing on our home printer vs an Office Max type that uses CMYK. 

Post # 5
Member
8390 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

RGB is what a monitor or television displays in. CMYK is for printing purposes. So even if you set something up in RGB on your computer, when you print it it’s going to be in CMYK. But you can change the color settings in photoshop as needed.

I’ll be honest though, if you’ve never used any of the adobe programs it’s not something I would suggest diving into with no instruction. The programs themselves are pretty pricey too.

Post # 6
Member
216 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Illustrator is great; used it for Save-The-Date Cards, hotel cards and am working on the rehearsal dinner invites. It has a steep learning curve though but the online tutorials are very helpful.

Post # 7
Member
822 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Yes.  I agree with Westwood on the diving into the Adobe programs without prior knowledge thing.  Everyone thought I was crazy for doing it.  I was working 70+ hours a week.  I was trying to lose weight.  With everything else going on, learning how to use the Adobe suite is not something most people decide to do.

But three of my coworkers offered to help me over our lunch hour.  i didn’t end up taking them up on it.  I just dove right in.  I was motivated so I made myself learn.  I gave up on Photoshop when I tried being a “photographer” and bought a fancy DSLR. 

You can create in RGB colors but if you don’t set up your file for CMYK, the colors get converted at the printer and you’re not guaranteed a correct shade.  This is fine if you don’t care about getting the exact shade of robin’s egg blue.

The programs are not cheap.  We already had it.  I got the entire CS5 suite when I bought my DSLR to take better food photos for my food blog.

If you don’t want to get into designing your own invites, you can go with free templates from various wedding blog sites or buying an invitation suite from etsy or other designers.  It’s really not as easy as it looks.  But I really wanted certain size invitations and inserts.  I couldn’t find exactly what I wanted so I had to either design my own or pay someone to do it for me. 

I got pricing from a local printer and they are pretty reasonable.  I would have paid a lot more ordering them from minted or some other site and I would not exactly what I want.

Post # 8
Member
89 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I have Inkscape, which is a vector program like adobe illustrator, but the best part it is free!!  Like the adobe programs it will take time to figure it out to learn even the basic actions.  I am making my own invites as well and played around for about a month before I felt comfortable and understood what I was doing.

Printers can be a little funny too.  You have to look at the specs and see what size paper and kinds yours will take

All and all don’t be discouraged; it’s doable and actually pretty fun and rewarding.  It might just take a little more time and research.  Good Luck!

Post # 9
Member
77 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I used Adobe InDesign. You could also use Adobe Illustrator. Photoshop could work but images/ text may become pixelated, whereas InDesign and Illustrator would not pixelate. I’m a graphic designer, so I don’t know how many people outside of my profession would actually own those programs beforehand. You could also use a greeting card program. My grandma uses those all the time for invites and cards and they turn out pretty nice. Hope this helps at least a little!

Post # 11
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2004

hi, I used Photo shop for mine. You can use this however you need to save them as a “TIF” or “TIFF” file, and i would suggest buying a thumb drive specifically for this. The reason you need to do this is because JPEG and PNG is usually used for smaller files. The smaller the file the lower the quality the picture is. You also need to change the pixel ratio before you start. I can help you out if you want? It really isnt that hard at all if you have an idea of what you are doing. But it can be done in Photoshop. Do you have an inspiration picture?

oh and i printed these out as if they were matte photographs at a local shopping centre. It cost me less than $80 to get invites, rsvpcards, a directions card, a registery card and a more information card. They looked awesome and i have had so many complements on them. I have even had ppl ask me to do this for them. It is very cost effective. I highly reccommend this. Please just ask and i will be sure to help out!

 

Post # 12
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2004

oh i just saw your post above, im not familiar with the wilton hearts kit. Is it stationary? does that mean all you want is text?

 

Post # 13
Member
3978 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I used photoshop and it worked out fantastically. I had only two colors though (a bright red and a medium/light blue). They came out crisp and lovely and I got dozens of complements on them.

I also designed my shower invites in PS.

I don’t think anyone can really tell you how to do it, lol, you either have the skills or you don’t. Maybe get a book or try some tutorials, but I definitely wouldn’t want my first project to be my wedding invitation! 😀

If you’re just doing plain text, I suppose you could use Word, though I always find it very clunky. Usually those kits have some sort of template you can download to go with them–which will make sure everything is correctly lined up. Other than that, trial and error, using plain paper until you get it perfect.

Are you asking about what wording you should use?

Post # 15
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2004

hi, well im just going to post a few things to help you start off if you are wanting to use photo shop. this is for when you create a new file thing..

Post # 16
Member
327 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

We designed our invitations with GIMP (a free Photoshop-like program) and printed at home on our regular ol’ Lexmark printer. Neither of us has ever taken any sort of design course – we’ve just learned along the way. I’m sure that the graphics could have been crisper if we’d had them professionally printed, but that hasn’t stopped a lot of RSVPs from coming back with compliments scribbled on them.

Download GIMP for free and play around a little. See what you can do, and use the user’s manual when you need it. If it’s too daunting, then I’d recommend seeking someone out on Etsy to design the invites to your liking.

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