(Closed) How to find a secular hospital?

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
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3008 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

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gingerkitten:  Would you consider a birthing center? I’ve never heard of one being affiliated with any relgion.

Post # 4
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5092 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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gingerkitten:  I understand; I wouldn’t feel comfortable relying on a Catholic hospital either. That said, don’t assume that a hospital is run by a religious organization based only on its name – I lived in an area where the only hospital was a “St. —-” and although it had been founded by Catholics, it was no longer run by a Catholic organization.

Unfortunately, I don’t know a good way to search hospitals by affiliation. If there aren’t that many in your area, you could just call and ask? Also, are you opposed to any religiously-run hospital, or just Catholic? Many non-Catholic Christian-affiliated hospitals wouldn’t have the same restrictions on reproductive health care, for instance, that a Catholic one would.

  • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  mightywombat.
Post # 6
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3008 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

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gingerkitten:  The hospitals might have birthing centers attached (which some people consider the best of both worlds!) or you could try searching “midwifery” or “midwife” and your town. You could also try the American College of Nurse Midwives (in my opinion you’re better off with midwives that are also nurses and not direct-entry midwives). You can search for midwives in your area.

I had a free-standing birth center birth with midwives and I had a great experience there! I live in a very small town but with a larger city nearby and there are three different birth centers there. Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1745 posts
Bumble bee

Hospitals work very hard to keep “decision to incision” for emergency c sections at less than 30 minutes. Most shoot for closer to 15 min. in true emergencies: prolapsed cord, placental abruption, prolonged fetal deceleration.  It just takes that long to move a bed down the hall, get a pregnant woman into the OR, move her to the OR table (because they’re in pain and movement is slow and awkward) get the monitors on to make mom as safe as possible and then do some type of anesthetic depending upon the circumstances.   

It sounds like with heavy traffic conditions you would be at least twice the 30 minute recommendation.  Then add in the time it takes to move a very pregnant woman who is in pain and/or exhausted from the birthing room bed, to the car … getting in the car, getting to the hospital, getting thru the ER and thru the hospial (probably waiting for elevators) to the labor ward, being  quickly assessed and you’ve added probably a minimum of another 15 minutes.  You’ve probably added that 15 min even if you call 911 for transfer.  Under the best traffic circumstances you’re 45 min from decision of transfer to c section.  That , of course, means that a serious problem is diagnosed immediately and not delayed for 10-15 minutes.

Of course, most births are uneventful.  There are risks/benefits and pros/cons either way. But if your labor/deliver becomes complicated, that is a long time if your baby is not getting enough blood supply.  Do your research, decide what’s best for you, but personally, I would not be comfortable being that far away from the ability do an urgent/emergent C-section with aggressive trained neo-natal resus.    

Post # 8
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11519 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

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gingerkitten:  I know that 2 of the major hospitals back home have ‘St’ in their name and back in the day one was the Catholic hospital and the other the Protestant and you knew which religion someone was just based on where they were born – they haven’t actually been affiliated with the church for years.  Don’t count them out just because of the name.

Post # 9
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927 posts
Busy bee

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fascinated:  those are very good points, but to me it sounds like the “25-65 minutes away” is from OPs house to the birthing center, not from the birthing center to a hospital. I would be surprised if the birthing center wasn’t right near a hospital, for the reasons you said. So having said that, do you think being up to an hour away from your birthing center is okay, seeing as you’re making that trip earlier in the labour? Or still too far for comfort?

Post # 10
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1246 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

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gingerkitten:  I feel you. Unfortunately, my doctor (who is awesome) only delivers at one local hospital (which, actually, is also a pretty awesome place in terms of care/resources/stats) that happens to be Catholic. To be honest it gives me serious belly-rumblings to have to cut a check to a religious hospital. But ultimately, for me it was about having a provider I was comfortable with and a good hospital that is close by. I would have had to double or triple my drive to get a secular hospital, not to mention finding a new doc, and there are actually zero birthing centers in my city. Hoping you have better luck!

Post # 11
Member
11744 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I gave birth at a historically catholic hospital but it’s no longer owned or operated by a catholic organization, which could be the case with yours as well? I totally understand being uncomfortable with a religiously affiliated hospital, but I think it’s really important to prioritize the quality of care you will receive there vs. a different hospital.

Post # 12
Member
3729 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: City, State

What specifically is your objection? (There’s lots of valid reasons, but knowing yours can help us give you advice).

 

Post # 13
Member
250 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

I work for a Hospital that also sounds Catholic and has ties to the Catholic Church.  So much so that a Bishop once resided within the hospital itself many years ago. I’d like to prefece what I’m about to say that this is in no way a judgement of your beliefs, and I fully support your search in a place to deliver your baby in an environment you are comfortable with.  I myself was raised Catholic but no longer a practicing Catholic.

With that said, most community hospitals today, even with affiliations to a particular religion, give zero dollars to the “church”.  Community hospitals are in very bad shape with todays medicare/medicaid funding and insurance payments.  It is a very compilcated system, but in general funds run very thin due to the reimbursement structure.  I’d urge people not to think of it as a “check cut to a religious hospital” and think of it as payment for the care recieved.  The nurses, doctors, midwifes and aides will give you the care you deserve regardless of your beliefs.  I think professionals in the medical field are often offended by people who think that they would put their own personal beliefs on their patients.  Their actions are based off of medical fact and science, not “faith based healing”.  Though, I fully recognize a hospital may choose to market itself that way, 99% of the personel would scoff at that statement. 

At our “faith based hospital”, though originally Catholic, has chaplain representation for many prominant faiths, not just Catholicism.  Most of the work of the Spiritual Care Department is focused on community efforts that are completely secular. 

Good Luck on your search! I truly just wanted to throw my two cents in and wish you the best.

Post # 14
Member
1745 posts
Bumble bee

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MsGinkgo:  You may be right.  I’d hope that birthing centers are very close to hospitals.  But for this OP if the birthing center is close to a non-religious hospital, problem solved and maybe no reason for original post.  So, perhaps erroneously, I assumed there was a fair distance between the birth center and the hospital.  Basically unless it adjoins a hospital or is across the street, you’re still most likely looking at more than the upper recommendation of 30 minutes (for TRUE emergencies).    

Is that too far to get there when in early labor?  First time moms usually get to their birthing facility with plenty of times to spare. Though recently there’ve been several news stories about a state trooper, a city policeman and an EMT who had to deliver babies prior to arrival at the hospital, so as with anything associated with birth – the usual and predicatble can change at a moment’s notice.    

Post # 15
Member
7310 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

The American Association of Birth Centers may be a good place to look for borth center options. I would not rule out a birth center that is 60+ minutes from home. Ours is 75 minutes from our home… without traffic (which is a funny statement, given that we live in the DC area). Our midwives deal with this situation routinely, and factoring in travel becomes part of the birth plan. They have patients who live 2+ hours away, so our 75 minutes is well within their range of normal.

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