(Closed) How to get dog to like car rides and to walk on leash better?

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
244 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

For the car, I trained my dogs by having them enjoy riding with the window down or putting treats on the seat so they hop up on their own, but they are very food motivated! I also took them everywhere I went so getting in the car was like second nature to them ๐Ÿ™‚

 

As for the walking, my golden was HORRIBLE on a leash. I mean, it was embarassing to people who would be watching the disaster. I bought a “gentle lead” which looks similar to a muzzle, but it’s not. I walked with her every day with it on and eventually she stopped pulling, going in 03985034895 directions during the walk, and was calm/attentitve to me. It took a little while, but definitely helped!

Post # 3
Member
1641 posts
Bumble bee

We have no idea what has triggered this anxiety, so take that into consideration. The association between “car” and “dog park” is too far for her to make the mental leap — she sees “car” and thinks “potentially traumatic riding experience”.

She has to associate the car with good things, so start off slow and toss treats and toys in and around the car. Praise her when she shows interest in the car, when she puts a paw up on the seat to investigate, and hopefully eventually she’ll jump in and sniff around. It may take a while to do it right across a number of sessions, but work up to it. Have a soothing voice, and let her investigate at her own pace.

Don’t force your dog to do things that it doesn’t want to do, like putting her in the car. It’ll create learned helplessness, and it won’t ease her anxiety. She’ll likely shut down. So it’s great that she is food motivated, because it’ll help her coac herself to investigate things she’s unsure of.

What else do you need for leash walking? If she doesn’t pull, that’s great!

Post # 4
Member
1552 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2016

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booktea92: What kind of car do you have? If you have an SUV, I would suggest a crate/kennel. Many dogs actually get car sick from the movement and the crate will help with this.

For the leash, you stated she is NOT pulling and follows you… so is she just scared of the leash? Work with her in the yard. Have her drag her leash with her while you work on sit, stay, and down. Have her follow you around the yard so she gets use to the leash being attached to her.

Congrats on your new fur baby!! =)

Post # 7
Member
302 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

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justinsgirl2016:  This.

The key to training dogs to do things that aren’t natural for them (like calmly locking one’s self in a metal box to be propelled through space at 65 miles per hour) is to make it the easiest, and most FUN thing they could possibly do.

Start small – bring treats outside and work on just getting the pup into the car. Whenever she jumps in – “GOOD YES YAY!” and treat. Then “Okay!” and lightly tug the leash to signal that she can get out. And repeat. Don’t even go anywhere.

Then slowly work up to closing the car door closest to her, waiting, and then treating and letting her out. And then closing her door and walking around to your door. Then getting in. Then driving to the end of the drive. Then around the block – at this point have someone with you to treat her as you drive.

You’ll have a car buddy before you know it.

And I second the Gentle Leader – it’s a godsend! It takes some getting used to for the pup, but with treats and distractions as she learns, she’ll be happy to oblige.

Post # 8
Hostess
4615 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

 

booktea92:  I know my puppy used to get really carsick (sometimes still does) and I was told that panting, drooling a lot, and hunching over a bit are signs.  My vet had me get regular dramamine (for people) and give my dog 50mg.  He’s a very large puppy (70ish pounds) so I would talk to your vet about this first, but some dogs don’t grow out of their carsickness.  After I gave my pup some dramamine for a long carride, he did a lot better without it.  I think sometimes having one bad experience in the car (mine threw up) can make them anxious.  Now he loves looking out the window ๐Ÿ™‚  

Post # 11
Member
1552 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2016

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booktea92:  Is she “attacking” the leash or playing tug with the leash? If tug, she is also play driven… do not tug back as this will increase the play on the leash.

You tube some training videos or sign up for a clicker based/positive reinforcement training class.

For the car… be sure NOT to give too many treats/food/water just before or during the car ride, this will increase her motion sickness.

Post # 12
Member
1641 posts
Bumble bee

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booktea92:  Gotcha. Make it fun for her, baby steps ๐Ÿ™‚

The general rule of thumb to get a dog to stop chewing on something it’s not supposed to, is to give it a proper alternative. Bring a toy out with you and when she starts to go for the leash, give her the toy and praise when she turns attention on to it.

Regarding heel, etc., have you looked into clicker training? It can be very helpful to “shape” the behaviors you want.

Post # 13
Member
302 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

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booktea92:  You should definitely sign her up for a training class. And don’t be afraid of the big store ones – Petsmart is a great place to start teaching her how to listen even with distractions around. Sometimes we’re sending mixed signals to our dogs without realizing it, and a trainer is the best way to teach both pup and owner the best ways to communicate with eachother.

Post # 14
Member
625 posts
Busy bee

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booktea92:  Associating cars with fun times did wonders for our girl. A trip to the vet is not a fun time haha, and after that she is hesitant to get back in the car. But follow that up with 4-5 trips to just the dog park, with the window down, and she is happy to do it. Sometimes nausea can be a problem for dogs, which makes them not like car rides, so start with really short rides and careful driving to minimize the motion sickness. You don’t want her to have a permanent car=feeling sick association. A friend of mine used to find her dog ginger cookies too as the car treat since ginger helps settle the stomach.

Hate to say it, but for the walking, we had to get a choke collar ๐Ÿ™ I almost cried the first time we used it but it is like night and day between walking her with and without it. 

Post # 15
Member
1703 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

Tons of treats getting in and out of the car on her own (while in your driveway/parking lot…not driving), and then treats while driving, especially if she is food motivated. This worked for our dog. We also roll the window down a little so she can stick her head out.

As for walks, my dog pulls if she’s on a leash attached to her collar or a harness that you attach the leash to her back, so we use the Easy Walk harness and a short leash. Works wonders!

Clicker training has also been great for my dog. Working on commands in bursts of about 10 minutes is best (according to the trainers we’ve worked with). Do you have any training classes in your area? We went to puppy class at our Humane Society, an then a Beginner’s training class at our favorite Petsmart and they gave a lot of good tips.

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