(Closed) How to keep my dog from biting (emotional post)

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
438 posts
Helper bee

hey your dog looks really cute I found this article on training dogs not to bite be it young or old dogs, I think it mainly talks about strict leashe training and consistancy in your training. I hope it helps, you could join some pet forums aswell maybe people on there would have some good techniques for you to use :]

http://www.dogbehavioronline.com/train-a-dog-not-to-bite/

 

Post # 5
Member
8682 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

Is there a local dog club or obedience club? They are normally much cheaper than a behavourist. Here is a list of clubs for Qld

http://www.qldstateobediencetrials.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7&Itemid=12

Also try the RSPCA- they run training courses.

If you have access to the internet try looking up episodes of It’s me or the dog. The show has a lot of good and reputable ideas on and methods of at home dog training.

Honestly if you love the dog then I would find the money to train it before it is too late and it bites someone badly.

Post # 6
Member
1075 posts
Bumble bee

I used to work at a dog daycare, and our go-to for nippy dogs was to gently but firmly hold their jaw closed after they tried to bite. You would stand over them, look them square in the eyes, and in a low voice say “no bite”. Sometimes this was followed by a “time out” if the dog was acting aggressive or growled when you were holding their jaw. If we did that loyally generally the dog would stop. Eventually you could even say “no bite” when they were starting to rile themselves up and they seemed to get that whatever they were doing was not cool. I used this on my own rescue dog when he first came home and snapped at me and he hasn’t tried to bite since. 

I have to add that this didn’t always work, if she’s acting out of fear (which it sounds like she may be) a different treatment might be best. Good luck!

Post # 8
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

There are two board certified veterinary behaviourists in Australia, you can find their info here: http://www.dacvb.org/resources/find/  If you are unable to work with them I would at least ask them for a referral to a trainer.  When I worked with a veterinary behaviourist for a rotation in school I was shocked at some of the methods still being used by popular trainers in the area.

Post # 10
Member
2105 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I am not a dog trainer, though I have trained my dogs. Start any training with exercise. If your dog is a runner, take the dog for a long run on a short leash. A long game of fetch is also good for less active dogs. The idea is to tire the dog and engage the brain. Then bring the dog into a triggering situation while on a leash.

If the dog is play-nipping, substitute the subject being nipped with a toy. Do not reward if the dog succeeds in nipping. The idea is to give the dog something better than a person’s foot when they are tempted. 

If the dog is trying to dominate-nip or aggression-nip ( accompanied by aggressive body language, growling), then you must immediately turn the dog away from the stimulus. The dog will not like this at first. Turn the dog’s head and body towards a wall and calm her. Once calm, make the dog do obedience tricks for you to earn food and praise. Sit, (lay) down, come, and leave it are key commands that your dog needs to obey no matter what distractions are present. 

Keep her leashed around strangers until she can ignore them. 

Post # 12
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee

Along with the training ideas PP’s have posted ahve you thought of using a muzzle?

Post # 13
Member
2105 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@Jacqui90:  Whatever you do, do not allow other dogs to approach her if she shows any signs of aggression. Dogs should never meet on a leash. Some dogs are okay with it, but many feel threatened and trapped. Every time your dog pays more attention to you than strangers and other dogs, reward with praise or a treat. Our new rescue is 3 and yes, much more stubborn than a puppy but absolutely trainable.  

Post # 15
Member
3580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@Jacqui90:  When was the last time she went to the vet. Perhaps she’s going blind or deaf or there is some other medical condition making her extra edgy or protective?? Good luck sweets! Let us know what you decide! 🙂

The topic ‘How to keep my dog from biting (emotional post)’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors