(Closed) how to kindly ask people to bring food

posted 7 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
1166 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

Don’t take this the wrong way, but why would you do that in an email? I would ask specific people, one on one, by phone or in person.

Post # 4
Member
5921 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2010

@pyma: If your friends and family are okay with that idea, I would probably put it on the rehearsal dinner invitations.

Post # 5
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@pyma:  So you have a specific menu that you want, but you want to ask other people to provide the menu items?  I don’t think there is a polite way to do that.  I think if you want to do a potluck sort of thing, you have to let people choose what dish they are bringing.  (I would even say that a potluck for a rehearsal dinner is impolite, but I know some here would disagree with me).

Post # 6
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@pyma: is it like a specific dish that person is renowned for? I don’t think it would be rude to say ‘Hey aunt sally, we would LOVE for you to bring your amazingly delish apple crumble to our rehearsal!’ but I would definitely do it in person =)

Post # 9
Member
1473 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@jenniferjane: I agree with you. I think it’s a bit rude. Only because I feel as if it is almost a “thank you” kind of thing where you are taking the wedding party and close friends and family out to have a nice, relaxing time before the the big day and to thank them for all that they have done for you and your Fiance. I may be wrong in this, but that is just how I view it, personally. I would be a bit offended if I was in a wedding and they had a potluck rehearsal dinner, especially if they were telling us what to bring. If you know what you want, then you buy/make it.

Post # 10
Member
1166 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

I think it’s too impersonal. You may not need a meeting, but I would think you’d get a better response – and more commitment – if you call and ask individual people, and work out what they’re each going to bring.

Post # 11
Member
2260 posts
Buzzing bee

I think word of mouth or in the invitations would be best.

Post # 13
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@pyma:  I say just try to find a way to compliment peoples specific dishes and they will be as malleable as soft clay =)  When people ask me ‘Hey can you make lasagna for this party?’  or ‘hey I want to bring my boss some of your muffins to impress him’ I take it as the HIGHEST culinary compliment and do an exceptional job of it =D Just make sure to express how grateful you are that they were willing to put time/effort into it. 

Post # 14
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@pyma: or if you wanted to get really sentimentally sappy you could even have a little card with each dish, describing it, who made it, what you think of when you eat it, if it’s a family recipe, cute stories kind of thing.  I think that’d be quite darling!

i.e:

grandmas lasagna: Everytime i went to grandmas as a child I knew this lasagna would be on hand! My dad insists the only reason he married my mom was to have life long access to this scrumptious bite of heritage!

 

Post # 15
Member
591 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

I feel like its a lot to ask of people when they are already in your wedding party or close family. Personally, if I was asked to make a dish for a rehearsal dinner and I’d already forked out money to be in the wedding party, I’d be pretty pissed. I don’t really want to get ready for a rehearsal dinner and sweat and fret over the oven. Just In My Humble Opinion.

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