(Closed) How to prevent picky eaters??

posted 7 years ago in Parenting
Post # 17
Member
1880 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I’m not a terribly picky eater but my brother is. Here’s the difference: if my brother didn’t like what was for dinner, my mom made him a whole different meal. If I didn’t like it? Tough, I had to eat it or make my own food.

Post # 18
Member
1497 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I think it’s really important to expose your children to all kinds of foods. When I was young, my favorite food was salad. I also loved seaweed and little anchovies, which other kids thought was gross. I was never forced to eat anything; my mom just always cooked different, healthy food.

I want my child to eat a variety of food. My niece only ate chicken nuggets and ravioli when she was young. My cousin only ate meat, no fruits or vegetables. They are both now obese.

I plan to mainly feed my child healthy food, but to also expose them to things like chicken fingers as well, so that they can eat whatever’s given to them at a party, like a wedding or birthday.

 

Post # 19
Member
1367 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

I am with you!!! We don’t have children yet but the you brought up the idea of picky eaters here ugh. I would not accept that kind of habit in our household! Our children will have to eat everything that is offered! lol

But I think it’ll be ok because we live in Japan where there are lots of different food options. Kids will generally be trained in Nursing school/ kinder/ schools. When I was in elementary, we HAD to finish everything that was provided. We couldn’t leave without finishing!!! As a kid I loved what adults were eating like fermented stuff, dried squid and seafood stuff and spicy stuff that are sooo good with beer (of course I couldn’t drink then though).

 

 

 

Post # 21
Member
6354 posts
Bee Keeper

Feed them what you eat (make sure to have a healthy, balanced diet). Just adjust their portions. Do not serve them “kid’s food.” That stuff is mostly pure garbage anyway, not what a growing brain and body needs. There is simply no need for nuggets or soda pop in the home.

Do not force children to finish their served portions (this can cause disordered eating in adulthood, at best, and lasting anger over forced feeding, at worst), however, don’t give them another option to eat instead. If they are full they are full. Meal over. Next meal starts again, serve them what you eat at that meal.

Post # 22
Hostess
7553 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2013

@distracts:  How did that work? Was he the older child? I would imagine after you’ve been making separate meals for a few years you realize your mistake! 

Post # 23
Member
917 posts
Busy bee

I’m a really fussy eater! Though I am getting better with age, but vegetables are just something my pallet doesn’t like. Both my older brothers eat whatever is given to hem, I’m just more stubborn, if I don’t like it, I’m not going to eat it.

 

 I’ve watched my SIL (oldest bros wife) deal with their two girls and eating really well. I think most kids at some stage are going to go through a fussy eating period, the eldest of their two girls is going through it now and basically it’s a bargaining act to get her to eat her breakfast/lunch/dinner, even though they had introduced her to all sorts of healthy foods earlier on in life. It’s just something that comes with the territory of being a parent in my opinion. 

 

Post # 24
Member
1880 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@AlwaysSunny:  No, he was the younger child. He was babied a whole lot. When we were really little, my mom was so busy taking care of him that I became more independent, and it just stuck that way. And yeah, you’d THINK she wouldn’t want to make two dinners almost every night, but in actuality, nope, she just made two dinners almost every night. And still does when he’s home from college.

This story makes it seem like my parents treat us really unequally but I swear aside from the food issue they really don’t, haha.

Post # 25
Member
1880 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

(And it is true, as PP noted, that kids’ tastebuds are different than adult tastebuds. Kids have WAAAAAAY more bitter receptors, or whatever, for one thing, which is why they often don’t like non-carrot vegetables. The science of the differences in adult/child taste is pretty interesting, actually.)

Post # 26
Member
1367 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

Yes, as PPs said childrens’ tastes are different than adults and they generally like milder tasting food. AND they go through picky stage at some point, however, the important thing if you do not want your children to continue being picky, is that you don’t give in and provide whatever they claim they like/want.

By the way, I hated cooked carrots as a child and I still don’t like them. I always thought, why is this veggie sweet! Veggies are not supposed to be sweet eww! But that’s about it. I eat all kinds of food.

 

Post # 27
Member
170 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I have read that picky eating is largely genetic (taste buds etc) so it doesn’t sound like you’ll have a problem OP

Post # 28
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

We always had to have a “no thank you” helping of whatever was served.  If we didn’t like the food, we didn’t get another option.  My parents would always say, “This isn’t a restaurant.”  I didn’t like a lot of the food we ate, but I still ate it.  The only time my brother and I complained and refused to eat was when my mom served us mashed turnips.  We looked at it, sniffed, tried a bit, and refused to eat anymore.  

 

Yeah I was 18 and my brother was 16.  Lol.  It was a great moment of sibling solidarity.

Post # 29
Member
7884 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

My daughter is almost 10 now and is a pretty good eater.  We don’t make her finish her plate- but she also doesn’t get to have anything else instead.  Now, I do think everyone is entitled to a couple things that they just hate and shouldn’t have to eat.  My daughter hates peanut butter- but eats mostly everything else.  I would never make her eat peanut butter.  But when people get to the point where they only have a select group of a couple food that they will eat- that is ridiculous.

Post # 30
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Just something to consider, while many strategies listed by PP are helfpul and can work, a few of those with severe food pickyness may actually have sensory problems (Sensory Processing Disorder) , which can greatly affect their ability to eat; not by choice, but by the way their brains process sensory info, which food is. Food is a stimuli, which for color/taste/smell/texture reasons they can have difficulty processing. Very interesting, I have a family member with this, and mealtime is a labor of love. She has gotten somewhat better with weakly therapy, but anything new is still a challenge.  For those children the “eat this or eat nothing ” does not hold up, they will in fact not eat anything. Mealtime can become more than just battle of wills. They often are underweight, and those without some sort of intervention can even be undernourished. =o)  With therapy many learn to eat more foods, and some will somewhat grow out of it….Treatment includes occupational therapy with child and parents. I love to eat, Fiance loves to eat, so hopefully our future children will too!

Post # 31
Member
7310 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

I make one dinner, and only one dinner. DS has to try at least 2 bites of dinner. If he doesn’t like it, he is free to make himself something else that is healthy to eat and must sit with us at the dinner table for the duration of the meal. Family dinner time is non-negotiable. This has been how I’ve handled things since he started on exclusively solid foods at 1 year. It works for us. When he was small, he ate anything put in front of him. When he got older and tried to be picky, he got real tired of not having dinner and now is back to eating almost anything.

But you have to remember that some picky eaters cannot help it. Some people are hyper-sensitive to certain tastes and textures. They are not trying to be difficult. They just cannot handle certain foods. So no matter how they are raised, it’s just part of how they are wired.

 

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