(Closed) How to stop being picky with food?

posted 7 years ago in Fitness
Post # 17
Member
543 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@LadyBlackheart:  I am the same exact way. Same exact diet. The thought of trying new foods makes me gag. I try to be open minded but when the time comes to try something new, I feel anxious and back out. I always have to ask what is being served places. I go hungry a lot at social gatherings. Fiance can’t try amazing restaurants because they don’t have “kid friendly” options. I feel like being a picky eater really puts such a negative burden on my life. I know none of this helps but just know you aren’t alone 🙁

Post # 18
Member
9800 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

I don’t know that I was ever a picky eater (I didn’t have a problem trying new things or hating foods) but in college when I first moved out I didn’t eat that well.  A lot of fast food, hamburger helper, frozen meals, etc. 

I would get a recipe book and start cooking.  You don’t have to change every meal at once, start off small.  Cook dinner a couple times a week from actual foods/ingredients.  I started cooking more and also reading more into nutrition and the benefits of real foods and over a few years my diet changed pretty significantly. 

Try new things.  You’re an adult and in control of your body, make yourself try it.  You don’t have to like it or love everything, but you’ll start learning and exploring things and will become more open to things.  This isn’t an overnight process (at least it wasn’t for me), but start small and continue to make changes as you go.

Also once you start cutting out fast food and all that processed crap, you won’t even want it or miss it any more.

I will also say that working out helps me to eat better.  When I work out I feel better about myself and I don’t want to ruin that by putting junk into my body.  So adding more exercise will also probably benefit your food choices.

Post # 19
Member
1332 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@LadyBlackheart:  I have learned that healthy eating need not be boring, bland, tasteless food.  It can actually be a lot of fun, provided you enjoy cooking/shopping, and consist of a lot of taste.  In your instance, you seem to dislike a lot of things, or are scared to try them.  Fair enough…a lot of us are in your same boat!!  

For you, I would recommend baby steps.  I love chicken fingers, always have always will.  But instead of ordering chicken fingers and fries at a restuarant, I sometimes order a chicken tender salad, with a light dressing.  Or, if you do not want the leafy greens, order a grilled chicken sandwich with honey mustard instead of mayo.  Sure, it still consists of carbs, or breading, or deep fried food, but you ARE cutting calories by just substituting a few small things.

Also, all of things you love can be altered into a healthier option.  Pizza is my downfall.  I can order a large Pizza Hut pizza, and easily down 3-4 slices, but instead I make my own pita pizzas at home…with turkey pepperoni, low-fat cheese and bake on a wheat pita.  Typically, I am FULL after I eat that.  You love hamburger helper, and really, who does not?! (ok, so a lot do not, but whatever…) Instead of making it from the box, loaded with sodium and other ‘bad’ things, try googling healthy recipes for the same thing.  I have found that once I started eating healthier, I was still able to eat great food, casseroles, pastas, etc, but it comes down to proper portion control and choosing healthier options; leaner meats, brown rice, wheat pasta, etc, etc.

Finally, I am/was very much a plain jane eater.  My palette was not advanced, at all.  As I have gotten older, I find myself trying new things, and LOVING them compared to when I tried them 5 years ago.  Sushi is my new best friend…yes, I love raw fish wrapped in rice!!!  The thought/smell/taste of it 10 years ago was enough to make me vomit, but I tried again, and now cannot get enough of it.  Who would have thought?!  Keep trying, keep working, keep altering food choices.  You do not need to cut out the foods you love cold turkey, and live on veggies for the rest of your life.  I promise you will see results with tweaks here and there 🙂

Post # 20
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

I can make myself try new foods by adding in something I love with it. I was convinced I hated burssels sprouts for years until I tried them fried up with some bacon and onion. That was delicious. Now I’m eating them roasted with just a little olive oil salt and pepper. It’s just my mom’s steamed to death burssles sprouts that I don’t care for.

So if you really like cheese or bacon or something add that in with a new healthier food. If you like pasta cook everything with pasta. Finely chop up some squash and onion and mix it in with your pasta. Then try to wean yourself from the crutch food. You’ll have gotten used to the taste of the new food by then and will hopefully even enjoy it by then.

Good luck!

Post # 21
Member
470 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@LadyBlackheart:  Hi, I am not trying to diagnose anyone, but this sounds like SED: Selective Eating Disorder.

It is not life-threatening of course, but it can cause anguish and anxiety over the thought of having to eat foods not on your “list.”

Post # 22
Member
262 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

DH was exactly the same. He’ll now eat just about anything because he saw a therapist for a while who did neuro-linguistic programming. It was a mix of hypnosis and talking about foods, etc. He went to about 4-5 sessions, and it was like someone flipped a switch in his brain. Amazing.

Post # 23
Member
4998 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I’m sure all of this advice is good, but given your unhealthy weight and somewhat of an obsession with food, I would consider seeing an eating disorder specialist. You shoudln’t want to turn down an invitation because you are so concerned with food. 

Post # 24
Member
1519 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

@LadyBlackheart:

My advice might not be too helpful as I’m an adventurous eater. I once had an aunt tell me that she would try an olive every time she had the opportunity because she WANTED to like them. So, she ate them until she liked them. I’ve adapted this to my own life. I choose not to say that I don’t like something until I’ve tried it three times from three different sources or styles of preparation.

Let’s say you try a new food (say spinach), and you don’t like it, you shouldn’t write it off completely. Maybe the cook didn’t know how to make it. Maybe you would like it if it were prepared differently (with eggs, in quiche, in pasta, on a sandwich, in a smoothie) Keep trying different variations from different sources. You may learn that you learn to love it!

Another thing, if growing up I HATED something (ie. sweet potatoes), I would make it my mission to cook it for myself. Again, sometimes the way it was prepared as a kid made it taste bad, or gave it a weird texture. And I would go through life thinking that you hate sweet potatoes. By trying it out yourself, pick a recipe that sounds good to you and try it out. Try different ways of preparing it. You might be surprised!

There are so many ethnicities of food, so many flavour combinations, there has to be one that you LOVE!!! Make it your mission to discover it. Also, there are so many recipes where you can hide the vegetables in the food so you don’t realize they are there.

On a side note, I was trying to incorporate more vegetables in my diet. I would go several days without eating a single vegetable. I discovered the green smoothie. I know you said that you are picky, but if you can get past the fact that it is green, you will love it.

If you don’t know what I mean, it’s a fruit smoothie with greens (spinach is the easiest to start with) thrown in as well. Honestly, you will never taste the spinach. I have a friend who is as picky as you said you are. I convinced her to try them and now she loves them. Give it a try. http://www.incrediblesmoothies.com/green-smoothie-recipes/

 

Post # 25
Member
1519 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

Also, one other comment. You mentioned that you eat a lot of processed food and fast food. If we eat too much processed foods, sometimes we forget what real food tastes like, so we don’t choose it over the processed variety.

Post # 26
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@LadyBlackheart:  Oh sweetpea! This breaks my heart for two reasons. Number 1– I used to have SUCH food anxiety and wouldn’t sleep over people’s houses or stay for dinner if I didn’t know what they were making and how they made it (aka either like my mom or not like my mom ahaha). My parents are both VERY picky, so they convinced me that certain foods were gross and I grew up thinking that I hated certain things (ranch dressing, beet greens, spinach, naan bread, any cheese besides american/provolone/mozz/cheddar, lamb, etc.). I had the same mental block where I just could NOT bring myself to try stuff. It was awful! I hated first dates because I would have  to look up the menu ahead of time and make sure I liked something which basically meant never going anywhere nice that wasn’t a chain.

But, like your SO, I dated someone who exposed me to TONS of new foods. I was just telling Fiance two nights ago about my class trip to NYC in 7th grade where all my friensd ordered ceasar salads at Hard Rock Cafe. I had never had ceasar dressing as it’s white and creamy (two things my mom loathes). I wanted to be cool so I ordered one and, lo and behold, I LOVED IT. Then, dating the other guy in college, his family had a farm and the most amazing garden ever. I basically drank a glass of wine before dinner and then sometimes would even close my eyes to get myself to try stuff! But it worked!

You’ll die over this– in Paris, I went to a restaurant called Dine in the Dark where you’re blindfolded and it’s dark and you are seated at huge tables with other couples. The chefs bring you a five course meal and differnet wines but you can’t see ANYTHING you’re eating. It’s based on the premise  that if one sense is dulled, the otehr sences overcompensate and you have a more deep and powerful sense of taste. I thought I was going to DIE but I mean…he paid for a trip to PARIS so  I couldn’t complain ahaha. The best part is that it was just such a fun and amazing experience! You get more and more drunk over the course of dinner nad people are spilling stuff and laughing so hard because they’re so nervous. It was an exposure therapy of sorts lol!

THe second reason is that my Fiance is exactly like you. He eats like a small child and he started gaining weight this past year. And his parents are to blame like mine were…I would post photos of amazing dinners I cooked on FB and she’d comment to say “I bet he had chicken nuggets!” and i would respond that he had the entire sun dried tomato and spinach stuffed chicken AND the beet green salad ahahah. Hee was willing to try new foods that I cooked and he loves almost everything. I am so so proud of him. Some of the stuff he doesn’t always love but he never dies– that’s the important part– you have to try enoguh stuff so you realize you won’t die. When we went to New Orleans, he ate ALLIGATOR and ordered a second order of it!!! I actualyl almost barfed when I ahd it and I started tearing up because I couldn’t swallow haahha The other day I had bought a really spicy hummus and he came up behind me and actually dipped a carrot in to try it without me prodding him first! I was SHOCKED. He said it was “really different but it’s not horrbile”.

But basically…it limits how much you can enjoy food and it DOES screw with your metabolism and your health.

My advice to you is to just keep trying. Close your eyes if you have to. Find a food you LOVE (mine was goat cheese) and then try to incorporate it into recipes to try other foods so it piggy backs on something you know you love. I know which textures I have a hard time with and if something is one of those textures I don’t like, I’ll pair it with something I do. For example, I don’t like the texture of sun dried tomatos so I mix them in with pesto or goat cheese. Every little bit helps. 😉

Post # 27
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Oh! And also! Remember how gross beer, wine, and alcohol tasted the first time? And yet most of us “made” ourselves like it! I always use that example and people recognize that they CAN force themselves to like something hahah

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