(Closed) How Wedding Guests Can Destroy Your Pro Pics

posted 8 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 32
Member
6299 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

@TwoCityBride:  It seems like those articles are the extreme cases, unfortunatly, it’s happening lately at almost every wedding. It only seems extreme because generally a photographer is not going to present the ruined photos to the couple so rarely do people even hear about it until an article like that is published. I have so many images from every wedding that are runied by guests, some of them I have no choice but to include in their gallery (like the ceremony with the iPad in the isle that I couldn’t ask to move due to church rules – in every single ceremony shot.) but for the most part I’m not going to show a blown out image from a random flash. Or the wedding I just finished editing last night, where the grooms sister stood behind the minister for part of the (outside) ceremony taking photos with her iPhone. 

I’m personally VERY torn on how I speak about this subject with my couples. I would never want them to think I’m a “hard ass” photographer who hates others with cameras. Totally not the case, but I also want them to look bach and love the photos they paid me a lot of money for. Every time I edit a wedding with shots like the ones posted in that article, I want to do one myself, but I just haven’t gotten the balls to do it yet. I love my clients, and I would never want them to think I was using their wedding as a “what not to do” blog post. 

Post # 33
Member
536 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@Nona99:  For us, making the “please no photos of us on social media” helped reduce the photos. We didn’t have 100% compliance, but it was WAY better than we had anticipated. You can’t control people, but sometimes you can put something in their brain that can help at least reduce a problem, even if you can’t completely remove it.

I think it’s hilarious (in a sad way) that people think they have the “right” to take pictures. What did people do back in the day without cameras? How on earth did they manage to sit through a whole wedding with nothing to do but simply enjoy and be part of the moment? Goodness me. /snark

Post # 34
Member
629 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013 - Dalhousie Castle

@PassionatePhotoLady:  This happened to us somewhat. My husband is looking at someone else trying to take our photo during all the family ones. I just he was just confused where to look as so many people are trying to take pictures at once. 

Post # 35
Member
4173 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

@chercee:  Its equally confusing to me….I’m an in the moment kind of person so when someone is like, “Hey, lets take a picture!”  I’m like…why?  I’m here, I’m living it…I don’t need some blurry mess on my phone to remind me….

Oh well, everyone likes something different I guess…what can you do?

Post # 36
Member
2354 posts
Buzzing bee

@IzzyBear:  +1. I’ve seen many reminders like these to tell guests there is a pro photographer, and please allow him to do his job by not interfering in the pics or using flash/cell. Guests are not stupid, they’re family members and friends, they won’t ruin the pics if they’re told beforehand. That’s probably what we’ll do and since it’s a small event with people we know are mature and not constantly plugged to their cellphone/camera, I’m sure everything will go well.

I don’t want to generalize, but I don’t like when vendors use ”fear” to convince people to hire them. This article or showing extremely bad amateur pics (while we all know amateurs who can take solid and artistic pictures that would rivalize with pros). I also know a pro who totally ruined my boudoir pics. It’s always a risk, because anyone can have a bad day. The important thing is to hire someone you trust. 

Post # 37
Member
1486 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

@KateByDesign:  

View original reply
@missfroggy:  The problem with that is that some churches (or ceremony locations) have strict rules on where the photographer can stand…such as in the article when they were not allowed past the back doors of the church…that does not mean just for photos but in general they are not allowed to go tell someone to move.

Post # 39
Member
2865 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@Luayne:   If that is the rule, and it’s the rule because they don’t want people interrupting or distracting from the ceremony…then why would they care if the photographer removed the nuisance?

 

Post # 40
Member
1122 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

See, I really think that this is the way to go… Not just for the photographer, but for the couple as well. 

I didn’t notice a darn thing during the ceremony (like people in the aisle) because I was so focused on getting married, my DH, and not passing out! lol Our pro pics turned out beautifully for the ceremony. 

As far as the reception…it really wish it had been unplugged. People stopped me all night to take pictures with them.On top of the photographers who had specific shots in mind that took up too much of my reception time… It got to be a bit much. I didn’t even get to dance really. It was very stressful. Everyone wanted shots. I felt like I didn’t mingle with anyone, I just took pictures. 

I guess I’m more of a “live in the moment” type of person. I rarely take pictures of anything. I like to just enjoy myself without a camera strap attached to my wrist. I think I’m the only one from my generation like this though… I just feel like your wedding is something you need to live in the moment. 

Post # 41
Member
862 posts
Busy bee

Ugh this is so frustrating! Our photographer is amazing, but also a dear friend of ours, who probably loves us too much because he gave us ALL the photos that he took, one of my absolute favourites of our first dance has DH’s aunt sneering in the beacground trying to take her own photos. Also so many flashes that ruined some otherwise great photos.

As a bride I was also really frustrated as we were doing formals there were so many people standing behind out photographer trying to get our attention and get us to look at THEIR camera. At one point I got so pissed off stopped the photos and said that DH and I would be providing some prints for those that wanted them, including family photos, we paid our photographer and he was there for a reason, let him do his job.

Our photographer, again being an awesome friend of ours did hip check a few people, stand in front of them and may have kneeled on someone’s foot. As far as I was concerned people should be getting out of his way!

Post # 42
Member
1008 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2019

After reading all of this I am definitely going to have a sign outside the ceremony that says ‘please stay out of the aisle, silence your phones, and turn off your flash’ or something like that. It isn’t unreasonable at all to ask that your guests sit on their hands for 30 minutes to an hour and leave the picture taking to the photographer. You paid for the whole event and they are lucky to be invited so they should behave.

Also we’re having a small wedding and every person on that guest list knows that I will crack skulls if I see someone screw up our pictures. I hope that their fear of my wrath will be all the encouragement they need, lol.

Post # 43
Member
2766 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

@missfroggy:  

View original reply
@KateByDesign:  

I was thinking the same thing, but that particular venue didn’t allow photographers beyond the entrance doors. In other instances, I noticed the guests were taking really close intrusive shots while the photographer was zooming in from farther away. I’m wouldn’t want to have a father/daughter dance made awkward by the photographer swooping in and shooing away a guest…but I wouldn’t want the guest so up close anyway!

My close family members are Instagram-obsessed. My mother will take pictures of nicely plated meals or a cappuccino for like 10 mins before drinking it, and then the rest of the time fiddling around with cropping and changing filters. My sister likes to bring a little point and shoot to take a ton of badly composed photos, and my brother is the DSLR shooter in the family.

They LOVE their amateur photography. I will just need to empower my photographer to feel comfortable telling them sternly to not ruin shots. I know my candid shots will feature my brother looking like the second shooter, my mom on her iphone, my dad juggling an iphone and a blackberry typing emails LOL. I’ll do some backpatting and tell my photographer it’s okay.

 

Post # 44
Member
6835 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Rocky Mountains USA

We had an unplugged ceremony and I’m SO glad.  Of course I’m glad our photos don’t feature a bunch of people with their cameras out, but more importantly, I loved walking down the aisle and seeing a sea of smiling loving faces instead of screens.  That meant so so much.

The only thing that sucked was waiting for 3 months to see photos of the ceremony! 

Post # 45
Member
6299 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

@PoppyH:  I’m so glad to hear you stood up for your photogarpher and got things under control. As a photographer, I do my best to ask guests to please let me have my time with the family during formals, but many times, unless the couple backs me up the guests continue to linger and distract the family. It eats up SO much time.

I recently backed into a guest (elbowing her on accident) because she was standing in the middle of the “isle” during a couple’s bubble exit from the church – causing her drop her iPhone on the concrete. I don’t think it broke, but I did feel bad. On the flip side, I have a job to do, and I can promise that her iPhone photo of them *running* through bubbles would not surpase my pro photo of the same moment. 

Post # 46
Member
1899 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

We didn’t even have a professional photographer yet had a guest issue with our reception pics as well.

To stay within budget, I had my mom be the wedding/reception photographer – she basically missed her calling to go professional as she takes amazing pictures. When I was walking into the reception venue, I wanted her close to me when I made my entrance so she could take pics of me walking in. Unfortunately, a friend’s DH TOOK her camera and said that “This was her special mother/daughter moment, go up front to be with MrsNew Day and he would take the pictures from a distance.” My mom tried to argue with him that I wanted her to take pictures, but it was no use – he was so PERSISTANT, and she didn’t want to break out in a fight or anything. My dad was the “back-up” photographer or second shooter, if you will, but he was busy carrying my stuff up so he didn’t have his camera on him. At the end of the day, there were ZERO close-up pics of me entering the venue and a couple grainy ones the friend’s DH took from far away (you can see them in my recaps). I mean, seriously, who does that?

Moral of the story? KEEP YOUR HANDS OFF OTHER PEOPLE’S CAMERAS – AMATEUR OR PRO.

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