(Closed) How would you handle this?

posted 9 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
106 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Oh I’d be livid too! Your cousin needs to call her daughters teacher and ask her why she things she has the right to take away a childs food! I’m sure your cousins daughter was embarressed too!

Post # 4
Member
2095 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I would be talking to the teacher and the principal. She has no right to dictate an appropriate snack. What if those were sugar free cookies?

Post # 4
Member
5976 posts
Bee Keeper

I’d be furious as well. I understand the teacher’s logic and what she’s trying to do, but she just punished the child for something her parent did. Not acceptable in my opinion. You had better believe that I would not only inform that teacher that I will give my child the snack of MY choice, but I will also let the principal know the same thing. You do not tell me how to parent my child.

Post # 6
Member
47440 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

” Hello, my name is _____. I’d like to speak with the principal please…”

Post # 7
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’ve been a kindergarten teacher many times and this is standard practice, but I think that the big issue wouldn’t have happened if there had been proper communication.  (Explanation about the snack policy on first day of school, and a more subtle reaction to this first day of no-healthy snack).

I, personally, would have let the child have the cookie because it is the ‘healthiest thing you have today’.  But I would also follow-up with a note reminding about the policy and examples of acceptable foods that most kids tend to bring.  I know that it does upset some parents, so I try to be really kind and casual in my note about it, but the food does need to be healthy. 

Kids today have a lower life expectancy than their parents, and it is primary because of poor nutrition and lack of exercise.  The schools have been asked to help out with this issue.  It is standard practice at all schools I have taught at that we eat healthy foods at first snack.  

The monitoring of this practice usually begins to wane as the children get older, where it is most enforced in kindergarten.  

My 2 cents.

Post # 8
Member
5493 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2011

That is completely unacceptable.  I would be on the phone with the principal immediately.  She basically deprived this little girl of a snack, and kept her hungry because the snack didn’t meet her personal approval.  That poor child.  

Post # 9
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I think it sucks that the little girl didn’t get a snack that day, but many teachers have classroom rules, and the parent was informed about it ahead of time.  My aunt teaches kindergarten, and she sends home a list of classroom rules at the start of every school year.  If parents forget or choose not follow the rules, she sends the kids home.  No exceptions.  It isn’t fair for kids, who really have no power in the situation, but if parents read the rules and don’t agree with them, they should protest it right away.  Waiting to bring up objections until afterward makes it pretty difficult to enforce the rules with all the other families.

Post # 10
Member
2140 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

View original reply
@2PeasinaPod:

Agreed. I don’t think it’s right she took her food away! So the poor girl was starving till lunch? I can understand if one of your students continually getting unhealthy snacks and sending a note home as concern. But it’s still not her business.

I would have a talk with the teacher as well!

Post # 11
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

As a parent, I would handle it by writing a note back explaining that I had slipped up with the cookie, but was also disappointed with the way that it was handled, and that my daughter should not have been punished for my mistake. 

Post # 12
Member
9816 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I would be LIVID. I would be calling the principal. My daughter is on a gluten free diet, and let me tell you, if anyone dares touch her food there will be hell from me!

Post # 13
Member
8020 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

Oh hell no.  If it not a school wide policy, it was handled inappropriately.  I am so sick of people telling parents what their kids should be eating- no one knows the individual circumstances of the child/household. 

For example- my daughter is in the 5th weight percentile.  She eats healthy and often, but she is blessed with a superhigh metabolism.  Her pediatrician doesn’t want her to drop any lower so he said to let her have WHATEVER she wants (after she eats her healthy meal of course).  So if she wanted she could have ice cream or cookies after everymeal.  She NEEDS the extra calories and fat.

That teacher needs to STFU.  Oooooooooo that makes my blood boil.

Post # 14
Member
5920 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2010

Did your cousin know that was their policy? I know you said the teacher “doesn’t approve” of sugary snacks, but I didn’t see anything about them being forbidden.  Big difference.  If your cousin just knew that they weren’t recommended, I would be furious.

Post # 15
Member
5654 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2011

While the schools in our area are anti-sugary things, and don’t even do cupcakes for bday parties anymore, this teacher totally stepped over the line.

If anything she should have sent another reminder home to the PARENTS… not make the child go without eating. That’s absolutely ridiculous… what’s a 2nd grader supposed to do “NO mom, I can’t have that b/c Mrs. xxxx will take it away.”

I would go straight to the principle… alot of times, talking to just the teacher doesn’t help.

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