(Closed) How would you handle this?

posted 9 years ago in Babies
Post # 46
Member
1763 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

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@stardustintheeyes: No actually what I said is that if the teacher is going to have those rules, which I do agree with that she needs to have a snack for the child. I also said that having unhealthy treats is distracting to the children and being full of sugar isn’t great for learning either.  You did go through to every single person who didn’t agree with you and disagreed with their post.

This is how it should have gone-child brings in something unhealthy, she could have the child put the snack back in her bag and go pick a treat out of the teachers basket. Send a note home. End of story.

ETA: I am done responding. We have different opinions and that is ok with me. I am still able to be respectful to others with different opinions.

Post # 47
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9024 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@stardustintheeyes: I have to say that reading through the whole thread, your posts are coming across as very defensive. 99% of everyone who has responded agrees with you that the teacher took the wrong approach but some people are just trying to give their  opinions about sugary snacks in schools in general and why the teacher may have felt justified to act that way.  It seems to me that you want everyone to just bash the teacher, and you quickly jump on anyone who tries to give another opinion

Post # 49
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3367 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

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@penguinsaremyfriends: child brings in something unhealthy, she could have the child put the snack back in her bag and go pick a treat out of the teachers basket. Send a note home.

Sounds good to me!  But, only if the teacher explained this course of action in a prior note home to the parents.  And if she was aware of all food allergies and restricted or special diets in her classroom, for every child.

Post # 50
Member
423 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I agree that the teacher should have a bunch of healthier options for when a child forgets a snack or brings an unhealthy one.  This whole situation could have been avoided.

Someone else said that the parents provided such a stash of snacks to their teacher – maybe something like that could happen here?

I just feel that because the teacher is the one who has to deal with the consequences of sugar in the morning (sugar crash), she should have the option to request healthy/non sugary options.  I hear what people are saying about sugar free cookies etc, but I think it is best just to avoid empty snacks like that all together.  It makes everybody’s life easier in the long -run. 

ETA: learn something new everyday!  I was totally believing that sugar caused hyperactivity and then a sugar crash, but some extremely superficial research prompted by the post above me leads me to believe I was mistaken. 

I still maintain that healthy snacks should be required and provided when necessary, but I won’t claim it is because of behavioural problems any more!

Post # 52
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5295 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

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@penguinsaremyfriends:


I feel like you were missing the fact that it was not, in fact, a rule but a recommendation that the teacher made with no mention of consequences for not following that rule or what foods would be discouraged.

If she had said it was a rule, then I still think the teacher overreacted and could have provided an alternate snack/letter to parents. But she likely would have been within her rights do whatever she wished as that was a rule for her classroom in which the parents are aware of the what will happen.

But it was not a rule.

Post # 53
Member
1109 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I agree, this thread is mainly meant for people who agree with the OP. People are going to have differing opinions without having to explain themselves over and over.

The only reason I am saying this is because of some of the wording used by the OP and others who agree with the OP. Saying the teacher humiliates kids and makes them starve etc is a little extreme. Sometimes parents/aunts & uncles/ guardians get very protective and they absolutely FLIP when they think their child has been singled out. This can make the whole situation more upsetting and embarrassing to the child. The worst thing ever is to think you’re in trouble then see your mom having a meeting with your teacher and principal and think oh great, they all hate each other, my mom is pissed, my teacher is going to hate me etc.

The original question is “how would you handle this?” Well first I would recognize that I’m hearing this account from a 7 year old, so she may have described it as the teacher getting furious and grabbing her snack away from her etc. but it’s worth getting the teacher’s side first. So I would take multiple things into account and call the teacher to smooth it over before becoming “absolutely livid” and going directly to the principal. The teacher will be just as offended if you go over her head to her boss as you are by the fact that she took the kid’s snack. If she’s really so wrong, just be the bigger person.

Post # 54
Member
9024 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@Lemma: It is most definitely not a myth. I dont know if you have kids or not but definitely you should try it yourself as an experiment. Feed them something healthy one day with lots of water and the next day feed them candy, soda and donuts. And you will see a giant difference in concentration levels, focus and their ability to sit still.

Post # 55
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9024 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@hisgoosiegirl: Ummm what are you talking about? at which point did I ever say it was a rule? I never even commented on that. I just stated what we do at our church and said it was mean of the teacher to let the kid go hungry. I think you’re getting my posts mixed up with someone elses.

Post # 57
Member
5295 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

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@bells: I must have been. My apologies.

Post # 59
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1212 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

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@bells:

The point of the study is that yes, parents will notice a difference. Read the study. They did 12 double blind randomised controlled trials. In some of them, the kids were given sugarfree drinks and the parents were told that the drinks contained sugar and then asked to rate their child’s hyperness rate. The parents rated children as more hyper if they thought that the child had been given sugar. 

Either the parents’ expectations are completely driving their perceptions, or the parents’ expectations make them treat the child differently, which causes the child to act differently, or some combination of those. 

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