(Closed) HR Bees: how long does a firing follow someone?

posted 6 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
973 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

In my experience and everyone I know, the length of unemployment and that you weren’t in any way employed matterered more than getting fired.  Do something, anything to get a job… temp, part time, not in your field, etc.  I have always heard (and seen) it’s easier to get a job if you already have one.  If nothing else, volunteer somewhere.  It will at least show you’re dependable and show up on time and can follow direction… plus you care :)… and you can put it on a resume.

I hate to say it, but there’s work if you’re willing to do it.  It probably isn’t what you want, or fun.  But it’s a job and it makes money and shows you have a job.  And you can still devote time to looking for what you want and are more likely to get it for having something, anything now.

You situation sucks, and I say this having been there.  Your fault or not, losing a job sucks.  It can be soul crushing… unfortunately you’re less likely to be hired if you show your soul has been stomped on.  Your profile says you’re in “New England”, so I’m assuming USA?  So my response is based on USA.

Seriously, apply at all nearby temp services, call them once a week without fail looking for work.   Volunteer (preferably in something you actually care about).  Apply anywhere and everywhere you feel you qualify and things you are over qualified for, and some you’re not sure you’re qualified for… you never know.  Practice interviews with friends and/or family… often it’s not “you got fired” when you get to an interview it’s how you handle the questions about it and what you learned from it.

End note/question … isn’t “involuntary dismissal” the same as “fired”?  Not trying to be snarky… everywhere I’ve been (south/midwest) it’s the same thing.  I’ve been involuntarily dismissed (fired… much to my dismay), so I’d never check “no” to have you ever been involuntarily dismissed…. because they CAN call and check… so I’m confused on that point).

Post # 5
Member
13248 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I don’t know how long it follows you.  You’ll always have to check it off on the forms (because you can also be fired if they find out you lied on a job application in most places).  I know in my line of work, it’s a big deal unless there are mitigating factors about why you were fired, and basically follows you forever.  🙁

I agree with the PP about getting a temp job, volunteering, and trying to get a better employment record.  Can I ask why you were fired and how old you were?  Being fired for being late at 16 in high school is a lot different than being fired for corporate embezzlement, you know?  (Here’s hoping it’s the former for you, not the latter!)

Post # 7
Member
13248 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Omgbunnies:  Well, it’s not job related, so that’s good.  If you’re submitting the application to the manager (rather than online or something), maybe you could ask for a minute to explain it if you’re comfortable.  You could bring up how you know it doesn’t look good, but it was a mental health issue that’s now under control and that it had no effect on your job performance.  That is, of course, if you’re comfortable telling this to someone you barely know!  Good luck!

Post # 9
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Here’s my experiences from both sides:

I’ve been fired.  Don’t bring it up unless you’re asked.  People get fired, sometimes things don’t work out.  I’ve fired people, but that doesn’t mean I don’t think they could work somewhere else.  When you are asked, be honest.  In my case, I filed for unemployment and they didn’t deny it, so I was laid off.  If they pressed, no, I didn’t get along with my boss so I was the first to go when there were cuts to be made and I’ve grown a lot since then.

From the other side of the table, I’ll hire someone who’s been fired.  My first assistant was fired from a previous job.  I asked why she left and she told me she was fired, but looking back she knew that she could have handled the situation a lot better when she had disagreements with her boss and she’s learned a lot since then. 

Shit happens.  Learn something from that experience.  Maybe here it’s don’t let your employer into your personal blog.  Or don’t work for such a jerk.  In any case, if you’re asked, just explain what happened – “I was feeling kind of down about some stuff, stupidly wrote about it on my public blog, and my manager decided to terminate my employment.  I’ve learned a lot since then – I stay off of a lot of social media and don’t let things at work get to me as much.”

Post # 10
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

Did you write about your job in the blog?

Post # 12
Member
172 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Honestly I would NEVER mention anything about health concerns mental or otherwise. As an employeer they can’t ask but if you volunteer that it only gives them a reason to not hire you – legal or not. As far as the reason for your firing being based on your blog, I am not sure an employeer can legally fire you for writing about them unless you are breeching a confidentiality agreement. Were you at least wise enough not to use the company name in your blog post? However, I think this is something you could very easily explain to a future employeer. Maybe address the issue in a cover letter for an online application or in person. If I was asked in an interview, I would simply explain that it was a couple of years ago and after a particuarly frustrating work day, I vented my frustrations toward my job on my blog (totally healthy BTW) without thinking about its public nature. However, my boss saw it and was not happy so I was immediately fired. In hindsight, I learned to be a lot more careful about what I say on public forums. In fact, if your university offers free legal counceling I would make an appointment and see if your firing was against the lawa and if it is worth approaching the firm to get the firing off your record.

You mention reconciling with your former boss, this does not sound like a bad idea to me. Why not email your former boss and make an appointment to chat to see if you could appologize and get a positive recommendation from her. Then you could either get her to agree to confirm that you left of your own will or at least you could tell a potential employeer that your former employeer will afirm your good work.

Tha main point is do something about it, don’t just whine that it is stopping you from getting a job, make it right and show that you are a good employee.

Post # 13
Member
172 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@Omgbunnies:  Honestly, if you didn’T use your employeer’s name I don’t understand how they could fire you…freedom of speech protects blogs.

 

Post # 14
Member
172 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Any chance you are in CT? Based on the below ruling, if there were comments on oyur blog post then it would be a conversation. If not, I am pretty sure I saw an article last week about free speech online as long as you are not divulging company secrets I just can’t find it now. I am also not a lawyer but it may be worth your looking into.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/settlement-boss-bashing-on-facebook-cant-get-you-fired/44595

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