(Closed) Humiliated at puppy school

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1431 posts
Bumble bee

Aww don’t worry it happens. I was def embarrassed once by my puppy at puppy school but the next time I went he was so good. Also, each time you go there will probably be different puppies and you are bound to have a puppy louder and crazier than yours and it will make you feel so much better. Also.. puppy socialization is the best thing for you dog. Even if its embarrassing for you he needs to learn to be around other dogs and people while he is young so he doesn’t act up and freak out when he is older around people.

Edit- also I might add every class I went to there were other dogs barking and not listening too. I never thought anything of it, it is kind of the norm at puppy class. And the trainers at ours would give those dogs a bone with peanut butter or something to distract them. Did your trainers offer anything or give advise while he was barking?

Post # 5
Member
1458 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

Why do you have an inside dog and an outside dog, if I may?

Post # 7
Member
1458 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

So is the puppy an outside dog, or are there two dogs? What I was going for is maybe if you tried to bring the outside dogs to dog obedience classes with the puppy (unless they’re the same dog) it could learn to operate better inside a house. It’s cruel to let one dog inside but not the other.

Post # 9
Member
871 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@KellyLouise:  Why is he an outside dog? Just curious. 

Post # 11
Member
15 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: December 2012

My puppy used to be like that. Some breeds just happen to be calmer than others. My labradoodle used to be so neurotic, I was scared to take her anywhere. The trainers used to get so frustrated with her because she rammed into all the other puppies and chewed her lead and jumped on me training session after training session. I can tell you cried many more times than once.

She was a nightmare to walk with, I couldn’t get her to walk next to me no matter what I did. My heart would stop if we met someone on the footpath as she’d make a beeline for them and drag me along the pavement (literally, I have scars to prove it!).

When she was one and a half years old, she managed to slip out of her collar at training, the whole half hour session was spent with everyone trying to get her back on her lead, she disrupted all the other grades, the trainers were fuming. People kept telling me she’d grow out of it, and calm down eventually. I didn’t believe it, I was ready to give up on her. I won’t go too much deeper into the details of her behaviour outside of puppy school. Obviously, I persisted.

I kept taking her to training, kept correcting her bad behaviour and took her for walks regardless of how naughty she was and how embarrassed I felt. Shortly after she turned three, I was stunned. It was like an overnight change. She went from being a psycho fur ball full of energy, to a calm, collected, well trained dog.

She turns five on December 7th of this year, which co-incidentally happens to be my wedding day. She recently passed grade 5 and is now doing trialling and winning prizes in obedience competitions, I receive compliments all the time when we’re out on a walk, or at the dog park about how beautiful and obedient she is. I’m so thankful I can walk with her in public knowing she’ll heel by my side and not misbehave.   

It has been an incredibly long road, the beginning was tough to say in the least, but for me the hard work has definitely paid off. I could not have hoped for a better dog, and she is now everything I’ve ever wanted her to be.

Post # 12
Member
15 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: December 2012

Keep thinking positively! I’m sure your puppy will get there, just like mine did. Don’t feel too badly about what went wrong. I found that the easiest way to deal with her was to forget about what other people thought and just to concentrate on her. My dog could definitely sense when I got too emotional which would cause her to behave even worse!

Post # 14
Member
998 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@KellyLouise:  The German Short Haired Pointer is the puppy you are referring to…correct? If so, I have to say good choice! That should be a smart breed. I know this time was tough because the puppy ate the treats beforehand (if I am reading this correctly), but in the future you should have an easier time training wih treats. This time, unfortunately, your dog was not hungry, and therefore was not interested in treats. Also, smart breeds tend to get bored very easily. There are toys they make designed for dogs to combat boredom because they cause the dog to use more energy and focus than just a regular ball or bone. Definitely look into those, and continue he training classes! I bet you once the dog starts focusing he/she will be miles above the rest πŸ™‚

Post # 15
Member
972 posts
Busy bee

I feel the same way about my puppy, with a twist. She’s almost 1 and still isn’t fully potty trained… I feel like a big fail πŸ™

Post # 16
Member
52 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Our Airedale did the same thing! It was so embarrassing! It was worse psychologically when he was doing the commands and tricks at home perfectly and then seemed to forget all is knowledge at class. It does get better though, with patience and consistency. Smart dogs do get bored quick-I know ourtonality wants to run through his tricks once or twice each and then he is done. We try and handle this by keeping a treat jar on the counter and having mini training sessions whenever I pass the kitchen. I make him do a few tricks, treat him, and move on. Just keep at it and sooenough you will seesomewhat results. Don’t expect her to change over night-it will be more like baby steps. Think of it this way-she is justpreparing you for kids! Haha

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