(Closed) I Really Need Pet Help :( (Long)

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
313 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2005

I wonder what had happened to her in the past that is causing her issues now.  It’s not normal for a psychologically healthy dog to pee in their crates unless she needs more walks.  It’s distrubing that your Fiance wants to take her to a kill shelter, even if she isn’t the perfect doggy she needs help to readjust to the living that yall are providing and sending, by all accounts, a sweet dog to her death is just cruel.  Her attitude doesn’t seem bad, just her actions.  I would recommend a book by Ceaser Milan (however you spell his last name, he’s known as the dog whisperer), I purchased one from him a bit ago for a dog we adopted that we’d been having problems with.  I also took classes in dog training from Petsmart and both things really helped.

If there is still a problem with peeing in a crate, purchase some of those puppy pads.  Most importantly, keep in mind this is only two months with the doggy, she is probably stressed with everything that has happened and has yet to feel at home.  She will pick up on your emotions and frustrations and act on it.  She has spent a good portion of her ‘growing’ years in a shelter when they are expected to deficate and urinate in their pens so really, treat her right and realize she is just as stressed as  you are.

Post # 4
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

Go back to puppy house training. Leash her when she is out of her crate and attach the leash to you. This allows you to look for signs she has to go and avoids her sneaking off to pee in secret when you aren’t looking. Take her out every hour or 2. Praise and treats when she goes outside (but only after she is finished so you don’t inturrupt her peeing and risk her not fully emptying her bladder.

 

Make sure her crate is just big enough for her to turn around, sit up and lie down to discourage peeing (since she can’t get away from it). If she is happy to pee and lie in it, that sounds like she may have spent some time in a puppy mill or similar situation. There are great resources online for house training a puppy mill dog (as they don’t naturally avoid lying in their own waste).

 

Clean everywhere she has peed with a enzyme cleaner so the smell doesn’t entice her to go there again. Also, take water up 3 hours or so before bed, take her out right before bes, and maybe get up once or twice in the night for potty breaks while she is still learning.

 

As far as eating everything, work on training the “leave it” command and replace the prohibited item with an allowed toy.

Post # 5
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

Go back to puppy house training. Leash her when she is out of her crate and attach the leash to you. This allows you to look for signs she has to go and avoids her sneaking off to pee in secret when you aren’t looking. Take her out every hour or 2. Praise and treats when she goes outside (but only after she is finished so you don’t inturrupt her peeing and risk her not fully emptying her bladder.

 

Make sure her crate is just big enough for her to turn around, sit up and lie down to discourage peeing (since she can’t get away from it). If she is happy to pee and lie in it, that sounds like she may have spent some time in a puppy mill or similar situation. There are great resources online for house training a puppy mill dog (as they don’t naturally avoid lying in their own waste).

 

Clean everywhere she has peed with a enzyme cleaner so the smell doesn’t entice her to go there again. Also, take water up 3 hours or so before bed, take her out right before bes, and maybe get up once or twice in the night for potty breaks while she is still learning.

 

As far as eating everything, work on training the “leave it” command and replace the prohibited item with an allowed toy.

Post # 6
Member
3150 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Puppies are really, really hard. You rescued her and you owe it to her to give her more than 2 months. Animals are not fair weather purchases. She is a life that you brought into your family. 

My dog ate crap off the ground for about a year after I got him. And then he just stopped. She needs a short leash with 1 hand in the loop and the other hand about 1 foot from her collar, holding her close. Don’t let her wander on the leash. This is really a minor issue. 

some dogs will never take to the crate. Mine didn’t tho he didn’t pee all over it. He simply cried about it every time. Have you tried maybe confining her to a small area to see how she behaves?

I find it disturbing that the choice is to take her to a kill shelter. If it comes down to it, why not try rehoming her with someone who is an experienced owner? 

Post # 10
Member
2105 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@ImagineDragon24:  Have you tried newspapers? I grew up with Bichons from a puppy mill who were kept on newspaper. Perhaps try using newspaper as a puppy pad (and of she shreds it a few times- who cares? I also recommend using a pet enzyme killer. 

Two months is nothing. We just adopted 2 rescue dogs and have had one for just shy of two months. She still has the occassional accident. Our rescue said that adjustment begins at two months. 

It’s great that you reward outside peeing with treats- extra good if you only give a particular treat when she pees. Don’t bother scolding her when she pees indoors unless she is actively squatting. If you try to punish her any later than the squat she has no idea why and that may be causing anxiety. 

Work with her on other training as well (sit, stay, etc) to build trust. Once of the commands you can teach is “leave it” and when she leaves whatever alone, substitute in a toy. 

If she’s peeing 5 minutes after she peed outside she may have a bladder problem. See a vet. 

Post # 11
Member
3150 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

@ImagineDragon24:  have you tried contacting a behaviorist? I’m not sure what they can offer but I’m sure they have some ideas. Sorry if I came off harsh- I should try to remember how many times I was going to kick Loki out- it was A LOT. 

Good luck with her. One day it will be a memory. 

Post # 12
Member
247 posts
Helper bee

No matter any amount of experience with dogs, there is always someone out there who knows a bit more. I’d contact a trainer. This is what they do for a living, and according to my trainer all behaviors can be fixed so long as you are willing to put the work in. Some of the work can be intense and practically impossible unless you stay home all day and can do nothing but work with the dog. Others are fixable with a few hours a night. If you and your Fiance aren’t willing to put in the work then I’d take her back to a shelter BUT a no kill shelter.  I know it’s frustrating but just remember that your dog isn’t doing this for fun, there is a reason.

Also don’t trust that the dog has no medical problems. I spent over a year trying to figure out why my dog wouldn’t house train and it took four vets before one diagnosed her with the condition she has. As I learned through my experience, the general tests only check for a limited number of conditions. Measure the water intake for 1 week. We kept a pad of paper next to our sink and used measuring cups to ensure I was accurate. Then ask your vet how much water your breed should be ingesting. He/She could be peeing because she’s/he’s drinking too much. Or because he/she has a condition similar to my furbaby. At one point we had to take her out every 15 minutes (even throughout the night) or else she would pee in doors. But we dedicated ourselves to it and took turns. My SO handled half the night and I handled the other. A lot of people thought we were crazy for doing everything we did but I refused to give up on her. In the end I now have an amazing dog whose medicated, well trained, and a blessing in our home. 

Dogs are a huge responsibility and it’s frustrating when it doesn’t go how you imagined. Please don’t give up until you’ve tried everything, but if you do decide to send him/her back PLEASE take the poor thing to a no-kill shelter were a family that is able to correct the issue can become his/her forever family. 

Post # 13
Member
2447 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Your dog will learn, she just needs more time. We’ve had our schnauzer for a year and he still has accidents. I clean it up and we move forward with positive reinforcement. It took about two years to fully train our lhasa. Both were rescues so they needed a little more help. Frankly, I’d be more concerned about the Fiance, he sounds like a total jerk.

Post # 14
Member
69 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@KatNYC2011:  Great advise.  Also check out Victoria Stilwell’s website.  They have a whole section on housetraining & the site is moderated by trainers.  http://positively.com/forum/index.php

My dog constantly eats things off the sidewalk, I’m always shocked at what he manages to find (whole bagels, beef skewer still on the stick, etc.).  We’ve worked on getting him to drop the food, he’s pretty good unless it’s something of high value.

Housetraining is frustrating but no rescue dog is going to be perfect, they all take time & patience.  I’ve had many breakdowns since we brought our boy home but I wouldn’t trade him for anything. 

Post # 15
Member
176 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I am not really sure why, but I had these very same problems for BOTH of my German Shepherds. Both of them had potty problems in the crate and neither of them were puppy mill puppies. Every night, without fail, I would have to clean out the crate (with enzyme killer) and wipe down the dog with puppy wipes. Sometimes I even had to give baths in the middle of the night. Then they would do it while I was gone at work during the day, even though I came home for lunch to walk them. I was miserable and tired for months, but I didn’t have the heart to give up my babies.

They are now 1 and 3 and neither of them have potty problems. After many trips to the vet and finding no issues, lots of walks, countless shredded puppy pads, destroyed doggie beds, restricted water, and lots and lots of special cleaner…we finally got rid of the crates! I’m pretty sure that my babies had some kind of anxiety about being in the crate. I know this sounds absurd, but as soon as we got rid of the crate, we stopped having accidents. We noticed this because at about 8 months for both boys we started letting them sleep in our room at night and never had any accidents. It baffled us that they could sleep in our room all night without accidents but would potty in the crate during the day.

I remember being so happy when we finally cured the potty problem for my 3 year old. It was an absolute nightmare when we got the little one and he had the same issues.

It sounds like no crate is not an option for you because your baby eats everything…but maybe try gating off a small area of your house (the kitchen maybe?) where there is more area for your baby to roam. Maybe if she has more room to walk around and doesn’t feel confined, she might not potty and lay in it. I hope things get better for you! I know how frustrating it can be and how miserable they make you feel in that moment! But, being an experienced pet owner already, you know how worthwhile furbabies are once you get past that puppy stage!!

Post # 16
Member
1328 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I had the exact same problem with our dog.  Seriously, I could have written that post almost word for word during the first months.  The stress is the worse part, it makes you feel like you’re going crazy.  But it gets better, I swear.  You just gotta hang in there.  We’ve had our guy 4 months now and while he still has some bad days, there are few and far between.

Something that really helped for us was to limit his water ALL THE TIME, not just around bed time.  Our vet told us how much water he needed per day based on his size.  So every morning we measured that amount out in a pitcher and gave him that water throughout the day, with the last of it around 7pm.  The vet gave us signs to watch for if he needs more water so we could ajust it needed, and he gets a bit extra on hot days and after we go jogging with him.  Some dogs will just drink way more water than they need if you let them.  I can’t tell you how much that helped.

Also, it can help to just expect the worse.  Get it in your head that accidents are going to happen.  Everytime you leave the dog alone plan to have clean up when you get home.  It made the accidnets less stressful becuase we treated it like a normal part of life, and it made the good days feel like winning the lottery.

Good luck 🙂

The topic ‘I Really Need Pet Help :( (Long)’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors