(Closed) I think we live in the wrong country! Maternity leave related.

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 77
Member
1623 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Tatum:As long as the well of new graduates doesn’t run out the well of people willing to do temp work to gain experience woshouldn’t run out I dont think. Its hard to find something when you are a new graduate so the temp work in your field would be a blessing to some. Yes if something better pops up people will take it, but so many companies now want 3yrs or more experience before they will even look at you for a permenant job with benefits. At least around here that is how it is.

Post # 78
Member
9028 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@pinkshoes- When I was in england the SLIGHTLY higher taxes that I paid in england gave me FREE medical care [except dental] including surgery because they have the NHS [national health care system] as well as heavily subsized prescription costs, PLUS paid time off if I had a baby. I have actually lived there for over 10 years so I think I know what I am talking about. I didnt need health insurance over there because my taxes paid for all that. It was just a better system. I think its hard for people that havent lived in that sort of system to fully understand it.

Post # 79
Member
9028 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@ galloway111 I think you misunderstood my post. I didnt say health insurance is not necessary i was just making a point for those who were saying that they rather pay less taxes and then have to cover their maternity time off from their own savings, versus paying higer taxes in countries like england and canada and having paid maternity leave.

I have health insurance and very grateful for it, and feel terrible for those who dont have it because I’ve been there.

Post # 80
Member
14987 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@bells: thats’s quite different than how I interpretted your previous post. 

“Why do you have health insurance in the first place, doesnt that cause a bigger deduction in your pay check? Why dont you just pay for all the medical bills directly from your savings?”

No need to get defensive, I didnt say you didnt know what you were talking about.  It seemed like you were talking about paying medical bills vs paying insurance.  I’m sure we can agree that paying medical bills is quite different and can be a boat load more than paying medical insurance.  The quite simplified discussion about extra tax for paid maternity vs less tax and saving up the extra tax so that you essentially have the same amount you would have been paid.  But now you are bringing in a whole new game when you talk about the governments also providing free health care.  I don’t know what “slightly” higher taxes actually equates to.  Someone on the first page metioned 40%, my rate here including state tax is about 32%.  Would I sacarfice my 8% of this mat. leave alone?  I dont think it would be ‘worth it’ in the long run for me?  Would I sacrafice it for the mat leave + full health care?  Now you’re talking a whole new game, and I probably would.

Post # 81
Member
3942 posts
Honey bee

@Corilee13: A new grad couldn’t do the job I am doing right now. My friends and I all have 7+ years of experience in our field, so finding a temp. to fill our positions would be nearly impossible. And if we were to find someone, by the time they got trained and up to speed, I would be back to work anyways.

It costs thousands of dollars to train a new employee.

Post # 82
Member
1623 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Bostongrl25:A new grad couldn’t do mine right off the bat either. I dont have 7 years of experience but I do have networking contacts that they don’t (I’m in marketing and PR) and I know the ins and outs of certain people in my field. However, they could help out with the simpler tasks that don’t require much training beyond what they just finished learning to alleviate some of the strain on the company. Simple copy ads, maybe a newsletter or two but leaving the big projects for the big boys (or girls). The way I understand it, that is the purpose of interns and temps; give them the crap no one wants to do so you can focus on more important crap.

Post # 83
Member
1684 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@MrsWeddingbliss: And university education too! It is so good knowing that your child won’t end up starting their adult life in debt already for their education.

Post # 84
Member
3942 posts
Honey bee

@Corilee13: That’s true. But who is going to do the rest of the work? Co-workers need to pick up the slack. But in my department, I am a one man department, and the work I do really can’t be given to anyone besides my boss.

My point was that it’s easy for people to say “Oh ya, just hire a temp”, but its not always that easy…especially for 6 months or a year. I don’t have kids yet, but I hope to someday. And ya, I would LOVE to spend the first 6months-a year at home with them. And if money was no object, I would. But from the business side of things, I understand why that can be really difficult on companies.

Post # 85
Member
7369 posts
Busy Beekeeper
@prettylizy: @AprilJo2011: THIS! All of my European friends have AMAZING benefits. I’m totally plan on making an international move myself in the coming year or two. I love and enjoy many aspects of this country but I think our POV is skewed and not in good way. Its all about perspective.

@Elvis: I think Americans should stop getting their information about the horrors of Europe from the mouthpieces of corporate lobby organizations.

Amen! Its so sad to see the brainwashing thats being sold over here. Instead of standing up and demanding the same for ourselves we are laying down and making excuses for the corporations and this broken system. If was so horrible why is it most of developed countried manage to make it work? As workers you are simply a cog in the wheel. No one is that indespensible. No one. If you get sick, die or go on maternity leave, someone, somewhere is fully capable of taking over your tasks. Is there a learning curve of course. But he idea that it will fall apart without it you is a tad unrealstic. People and companies adapt everyday. Workers get laid off, jobs are restructured all the time and the work STILL gets done. Thats the simply the nature of the beast. There will always be work to get done and there will always be pool of candidates (both qualified and trainable). The. End.

I think Ms. D is hit it head. @Mrs. DG: People here tend to vote for the interests of the super-rich, perhaps because we all think we’ll be there one day.

 

Post # 86
Member
1829 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Yes, Americans do live in the wrong country in terms of receiving adequate maternity leave.  I’m an American but there is definitely a reason why Darling Husband and I do not want to start/have a family in the US and part of that is the terrible maternity leave/health care there.  

When I was living in the UK, working as a social worker, had I become pregnant, I would have received 6 months full pay, 6 months half pay, and then another 12 months of my job being held but without receiving any salary (during that time, replacement workers would be filling my position but when I wanted to come back, the job was mine). The only catch with that is that I would have had to go back to work full time for one year after maternity leave, otherwise, I would have to pay back the money spent covering my maternity leave.  Sounds fair enough to me.

For those of you who think it is ridiculously expensive to live in European countries and that the taxes are sky high, I can say from personal experience that that is 100% incorrect.   As a Social Worker (notoriously underpaid and overworked in the US), I made nearly double the salary I would have in the US and the tax rate was not much different from what it was in the US.  Add in that there are no insurance costs to be paid (all health care in the UK is free – I mean completely free, you don’t even pay a co-pay at the doctor’s office) and it works out to be a much better deal.

Australia is currently an amalgamation of the US and UK, but definitely leaning more towards the US side of things, unfortunately, with 18 weeks of paid maternity leave at minimum wage (although minimum wage here is nearly $16/hr).   I’m not working right now and probably won’t be if we decide to start a family here as DH’s salary is more than sufficient for us.  Also, the fact that health care is free here too is a nice bonus.

Trust me, I’d rather pay marginally higher taxes (and it really is only a marginal difference) and enjoy an appropriate amount of maternity leave, free health care, and quality education (not that that’s part of the discussion but it’s covered under the higher taxes).   

Post # 87
Member
2889 posts
Sugar bee

@pinkshoes: In Germany you get a year paid at about 60% if I am correct and while taxes are higher, pay is generally not lower (varries by field I’m sure). However, you also get Kindergeld which is something like $250 per child per month from birth to age 25 (ish) as long as you are linging in/paying taxes to Germany. So, it’s a better situation hands down. Furthermore, many companies will hold your job for up to 3 years even though you wouldn’t get paid for the years 2 and 3 you would not hav eto worry to find a new job. One of the secretaries at my company had a new baby and said see you in 3 years. It’s also true that you have to stop working at a certain point before birth and this is not negotiable as you become an insurance hazard in the office.

That being said, I’ve always planned on waiting to have children until I return to the US but I’m not sure it makes any kind of sense.

Post # 88
Member
1091 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2020 - Oakland Manor

@SpecialSundae: and that is why I plan on having babies in the UK (that plus the better maternal and infant mortality rates). 

When I was on my own insurance at my job – I didn’t even have maternity coverage and would have received NO maternity leave beyond my vacation time and sick time. Now I’m on my husband’s insurance so I at least have coverage, but still don’t have maternity coverage from my job…

Post # 89
Member
3374 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Fiance and I together make over 200k, we only pay less than 20% taxes (I think I only paid 16%). I’m not sure how much the person who said they pay 30% taxes must make… And lots of states don’t have income tax. I believe our sales taxes are lower too because we don’t have VAT.

 

Post # 90
Member
828 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

@PinkMagnolia: We’re both pretty happy with what we make/do for a living as well. I’m sure when the time comes (4-5 weeks postpartum is when I expect to return part-time, full time by 8 weeks) I’m going to be pretty sad to leave my son and maybe if he weren’t staying with his father during the day, I’d feel differently about returning to work full time. I believe we can have the best of both worlds, being content in our chosen careers and our family lives. I’m proud to make a living and be a mommy-to-be. 

Post # 91
Member
2584 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@PinkMagnolia: Where do you live, out of curiosity? I’m pretty sure my parents pay about 30% in taxes, as do most other people I know… not counting sales tax when we shop.

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