(Closed) I'm a Make-Up artist, have any questions?

posted 5 years ago in Beauty
Post # 2
Member
2449 posts
Buzzing bee

I’m very pale, and have trouble with shades matching my albino skin tones… ugh I’m so pale. Anyway, we are having our engagement shoot while down in cancun. Any advice on what make up brands or tips I can use so my makeup doesn’t melt off of my face? 

I also have pretty bad acne any advice on face washes or treatments to get it under control. 

Post # 3
Member
394 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I would love some suggestions on the best lipstick shades for my wedding.  I am very fair with dark blonde hair and blue eyes.  I am interested in a pink/neutral shade on the lighter side.  My only issue is that my lips are very pigmented so anything too light makes me look washed out/sick.  It’s hard to find the right shade!

Post # 4
Member
214 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

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Missbigdreamer:  I am very pale, have pretty bad acne, and am broke as hell. I’m eloping in October, and I would LOVE some recommendations on foundation, concealer, and powder that would last the whole day. And not too expensive! That’s a big list, sorry! 

Post # 5
Member
608 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

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Missbigdreamer:  Are there any things that clients do while you’re doing their makeup that drives you up a wall, or is considered rude? How does one be an AWESOME client?

Post # 6
Member
267 posts
Helper bee

I’ve had make up artists that do air brush tell me air brush is the best and lasts the longest, and then other make up artists that don’t do air brush tell me that isn’t true and traditional make up lasts longer! Which one is it? Thanks!!!

Post # 7
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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ahartig: Nurturing Force Blot Out Offensive to help with the hot weather and make an appointment with a dermatologist (makeup artists – unless they have additional training – can’t give out skincare advice).

Post # 8
Member
2449 posts
Buzzing bee

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Sukii:  thanks! I’ve been trying to find one in the area I’m at but not much luck. My face isn’t horrible… but rather have it taken care of before my wedding. 🙂

Post # 9
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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dreamr12: That’s a hard one without seeing your skin. Colour matching really comes down to your base skintone. “Fair” could mean a variety of tones so my suggestion would be to head to a makeup counter and ask for advice face to face. As for the pigmentation issue, try a lip base or even a little concealer on your lips to neutralize the colouring a little before adding lippy. If you have a colour chart handy, find the colour that looks most similar to your natural lip colour, and apply a little bit of the opposite colour on your lips first to even it out, seal it and then go over the top with your favourite colour.

Post # 10
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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warriorprincess: Covering up acne is all about the application/technique. Try searching for some vids on YouTube and practice, practice, practice. A setting powder or spray will help your makeup stay put. I love Kett Sett Powder (a tad pricey if you don’t have a pro discount) and Skindinavia Finishing Spray (you can get a small bottle for under $15.00 bucks depending on where you are – that’s in Aussie dollars).

Post # 11
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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ICallHimFarmBoy: 1. Please bring enough pictures of what you want, but not too many and make sure they’re all cohesive – conflicting pictures are the worst.

2. Be realistic. Understand that what you want my not be possible due to your face structure (eg. a client with monolids will never be able to get a full Persian eye look unless it’s literally painted on like a doll).

3. If you don’t like the result, PLEASE tell me. I would much rather work longer to fix any issues and have you leaving happy than have you leaving unhappy. You paid for my time, I’m going to try my best to give you what you want and no, I will not charge you extra for overtime unless it’s just a matter of you changing your mind on the look.

4. Accept advice. At the end of the day I will do what you want (within reason) but I’m trained to know which products, colours and styles will work on you and which will not. Take it onboard. If you still decide against it then that is fine but please don’t take offense when I suggest something either – I just want to get you looking the best you can.

5. Don’t touch my kit!! We work hard to keep a sanitary environment to keep our kit safe from infections and we don’t want you, the client to suffer by contracting anything either. Nothing irritates me more than when a guest of a client starts dipping their own brushes into my makeup. I then have to sterilize, depot and sometimes even throw out pro makeup (not cheap!!) if it’s unsalvageable (emollient, etc.).

Post # 12
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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purplebee3: It really depends on the brand being used. Some airbrush makeups will last longer than traditional and vice versa. I myself prefer traditional because I’m all about the skin looking like skin and find airbrushing has a different look about it. That’s just my personal taste though. If your makeup is getting set properly, it should last you through the night regardless of whether it’s airbrush or traditional. It just comes down to your personal preference of the “look” you like.

Post # 13
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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Missbigdreamer: Sorry to jump in like that, I just noticed you hadn’t been back to respond yet so thought I’d throw in my own 2 cents for now. I’m sure you have more advice to add.

Post # 14
Member
173 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

How come MUA`s always want to do the big “reveal” at the end?

I would much rather be able to check my face at each stage of the application so I can correct what I dont like.

Post # 15
Member
2010 posts
Buzzing bee

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elleodee1: Because we go in different stages to what a client might be used to and sometimes we plan to come back to something later. For instance, I fill in the brows ever so slightly just to see what the shape will be like in order to give me a better idea of how the eyeshadow will sit with the rest of the face. I come back towards the end of the application to complete the brows and do the actual work on them. I like to give the client an outline of the order in which I do things before proceeding but there is no way the client can know what I am thinking. If something isn’t working out right, I will move onto something else that may help with the problem area which I’m planning on coming back to. The client can’t possibly know that. Some people don’t feel comfortable speaking up during an appointment. Either they think the makeup artist is going to get offended, angry or upset (not at all, we want the client to be happy and if they don’t speak up, we’ll never know there is something they want changed). These softly spoken clients will just sit there thinking, “Is she going to fix that?”, “That can’t be right”, “Oh no, I look so bad”, etc. without knowing that I know the lipstick isn’t reaching all the way to the edge and I’m coming back to finish it. Get what I mean? It’s such an unpleasant experience for the client if they’re stressing throughout the appointment. We just want you to sit back, relax and let us do our best to make this an enjoyable experience for you. You won’t be able to relax if your tense for 10 minutes straight about the bronzer not being blended enough when it’s on my to-do-list. It’s not so much a “big reveal” but moreso to make the appointment easier on both of us. You’re more relaxed and I get to get on with it and do my job without constant interruptions telling me that I haven’t done anything to your lashes yet (I’m aware I haven’t, it’s coming) and pointing out the colour on your eyes isn’t what you asked for (it’s eye base, the colour is still to be applied). I want to do my thing and then show you at the end and if there is something you don’t like, then I’m happy to fix it. It’s just harder to even get it done in the first place when you’re constantly stopping and starting.

“I would much rather be able to check my face at each stage of the application so I can correct what I dont like.”

That’s fair enough however please understand that every artist has their own order in which they do things and it may seem straightforward to think, “I’ll get the problem fixed better if I catch it before it’s finished happening” but in reality it actually makes things harder. For example, I apply the blush before I apply lippy and then I go back and either blend out or apply more blush depending on how it looks near the lips. You would probably stop me just before I’m done with the lips and say, “The blush is clashing. It’s too much, I don’t like it” at which point I will tell you I was already planning to blend it out and then there is that, “Oh” and then an awkward silence while I get back to work. Either that or you don’t believe me when I tell you I’m already aware of it and it undermines my skills as a makeup artist because it appears the client has to point out something so simple and teach me how to do my job. It’s just awkward all ’round. I hope I was able to articulate what I mean.

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