(Closed) Im a size 10?!Or how NOT to measure your ring size

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
966 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Fool proof way – go into a jeweler and ask for your ring size.

Post # 4
Member
3344 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Blue nile will send you a ring sizer for free, or you can print one.

Post # 7
Member
344 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@Bellanouva: Even if you’re able to get a more accurate measurement at home, go to a jeweler.  At home (without ring sizers) it’s harder to determine whether you’re in between sizes (3 1/4, 4 1/8, etc.).  Tell him to also take into account the width of the band.  A thinner band will need to be smaller than a thicker one.

Post # 9
Member
344 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@Bellanouva: Sorry, I just saw your post.  Where is he planning on getting your ring??  Some rings aren’t available in a 4.5?? 

Post # 12
Member
5118 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Bellanouva: I would definitely check the thickness of the band, so when you go into the jewelers you know whether to try on their thin bands or their thick bands. If you plan to get a wedding band (I’m assuming you’re measuring for your e-ring), maybe take that into consideration as well and go .25 up just to allow for the greater width you’ll have if you wear your band and e-ring together or solder them.

Also, maybe check with the seller to see what size they can make. I have 3.25 ring size, and Fiance got my ring sized to 3.5 (for that little extra wiggle room that will disappear with soldering a wedding band on). Even if the ring isn’t originally available in you size, they could maybe size it down or make a new mold for it so it fits just right. 

Post # 14
Member
5118 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Bellanouva: Glad to help. If you message the seller and they can’t make a smaller mold, check with them to see what metal it’s composed of. Some settings are harder to size down, especially with channel set diamonds, tension settings, or lots of filigree or detail on the sides.

Stopping into a jeweler first, even if you’re planning to buy online, will really help you find out what works best for your fingers, what size you’ll need, what sort of side work can be on it, etc. Have fun, it’s shopping! ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 15
Member
344 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@Bellanouva: As NDBride said, the thickness of the band (addition of wedding band) will impact your ring size.  When in doubt, I would advise going a half size up, because there are a lot more options when it comes to making a ring a little bit smaller.  My ring is a little more than a half size too big, so we put in a horse-shoe spring (butterfly spring) to make it smaller.  Later in life when I choose to add a wedding band (or have babies) I can take it out without affecting the structural integrity of the ring.  What type of ring are you looking for??  Plain solitaires are the easiest to size, bands with a lot of stones are harder.. especially if the size is off by a lot.  I think what you’re doing (getting a good idea of your ring size) is very smart.  

Picture of my butteryfly spring sizer

Post # 16
Member
3148 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2010

I don’t think downloading and printing a paper size guides is very accurate. it will only give you a ballpark figure.

the very best way is to go to a jewelry store and ask them to measure your finger with a sizer. and then ask to try on a few rings in that size just to be sure. try different thicknesses too.

the tiniest size differences make a huge difference in comfort! I thought my engagement ring fit perfectly, and then after a month of wearing it, I decided to size it up 1/4 of a size. seems insignificant, but it felt way better to me!

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