I'm incredibly frustrated and I just need to vent.

posted 2 years ago in College
Post # 2
Member
10508 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2016

For future reference, the issues you are having with your group should have been brought to your instructor’s attention way before now. As an instructor it’s a lot easier to figure out a way to accommodate a student in your situation when we are kept in the loop. I’d be incredibly annoyed to get an email at the last minute about all of this asking about an alternative assignment.

In your position I would be prepared to do the entire presentation alone and hope your group members show up on the day of so you don’t have to. You also don’t need to meet in person (though it is preferable) you can just email each other your parts.

Group projects are the worst and I don’t assign them any more.

Post # 3
Member
1643 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2021 - Glacier National Park-Montana

I can sympathize.  I was in an online program and we had a group project to do.  It was all done over the internet, so you can imagine the level of accountability.  I was with one guy who maybe contributed 10% of the work and the other two girls essentially contributed nothing.  Then we lost a point because the guy wrote something incorrect on a slide.   Sometimes you have to carry the group of you want to succeed.  Do what you can to hold people accountable but be prepared to go it alone. Works the same way in life. 

Post # 4
Member
267 posts
Helper bee

I always hated group projects. I learned the hard way notifying a prof too late that my members were unreliable. Ended up with a poor mark for the presentation but thankfully I’m a strong test taker and that saved my overall grade. 

Why not communicate with these girls via email after divvying up each persons section. That way you also have some hard proof of who is responsible for what and how well their response times are etc. I usually try to have a strong idea of the entire presentation (not just my section) in case members bail I am prepared. 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
1012 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

I escaped undergrad with only having to do one group project. And people who assign group projects should burn in hell. 

You don’t have alot of options at this point. If the teacher cared about fairness they wouldn’t have assigned a group project. I would just be prepared on my own and resign myself to the fact that I might get docked for that too. 

Post # 7
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

Depending on your field of study, the group format could be a lesson in collaboration. A lot of professions require interpersonal work, group accountability, communication, and scheduling. I learned this very quickly in my masters program when group projects became the norm. Professors would assign 5 page group papers knowing that the collaboration was much harder than the actual task of writing the paper. There are some valuable lessons to be learned from the process. 

1. Usually a leader is established during the first one or two group interactions. The leader is either someone who has the most experience with the subject, the best student, or someone who has a lot of time to dedicate to the project. The leader keeps other group members accountable for their share of work.

2. Make a plan during your first meeting. Do this as soon as the project is assigned. Divide the work thoughtfully so your final result is cohesive. 

3. Communicate as much via email as possible. In-person meetings aren’t usually feasible unless you set aside 30 mins before or after each class. 

Right now I would just suck it up and do the project on your own. You can blame the other girls and the other girls can blame you, but it’s your grade on the line. Failing groups often fit the same pattern… procrastinating for various reasons, then fighting and pointing fingers at the deadline. 

Post # 8
Member
1012 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

Except that in an actual job if someone fails to work or show up AT ALL they don’t get paid, and in college you don’t do the work or show up so that you can leave TO get paid. Co-students have no incentive to listen to you. 

Post # 9
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

View original reply
impatient1 :  Fair enough, but in school and “real life” there are always slackers and finding ways to cope with that is a valuable skill… Also, I would hope that if girl C literally comes to class 10% of the time the professor would dock her grade. Usually group accountability motivates people to keep their end of the deal and do their share of the work. In my experience those who always ghost have other things going on in their life and it’s easier to cut your losses and not expect them to help. 

Post # 11
Member
1012 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

View original reply
frillsandthrills :  There are slackers at jobs but I feel like at ANY job if I showed up 0% of the time and did 0 work, or even if I showed up 10% of the time I’d be fired. Group projects force you to “deal with” situations that are not at all realistic. And people can learn how to “work in a team” at their actual jobs. 

Post # 12
Member
1007 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

 

So many of these memes exist because this is a tale older than time! The dreaded group project! I think everyone in college probably goes through this at some point so you’re not alone! No practical advice at this point because you’re so close to the due date. 

Post # 13
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

View original reply
impatient1 :  ok… but isn’t there something to be said for taking some initiative and viewing this as an opportunity to better oneself? I mean, the stakes are pretty low in a classroom as compared to workplace, so why not practice some leadership or group management skills during the project? 

Anyway, OP- it sucks that you have to deal with bad group mates. Do it for your grade and hopefully the other girls will pull through. My advice is to communicate via email and show up an hour or 30 mins before class to practice your presentation.  

Post # 14
Member
1012 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

In leadership positions at work you’re allowed to fire people. And if you’re no t you can expect the same results. There is no way to force other people to do a thing. Especially when you lack any incentives to give. 

Post # 15
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

View original reply
impatient1 :  OP has essentially already fired girl C. She cannot fire girl A and B. I suggested that she change her communication methods and schedules meetings at more convenient times (directly before or after class).

It’s easy to fire people. Retention is hard. Not sure where you work or if you’re a manager but in my experience not everything is so black and white… 

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