(Closed) Im thinking about Surgery

posted 7 years ago in Full Figured
Post # 3
Member
2522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

I wouldn’t have surgery b/c anecdotally some have gone back to weighing what they were before the surgery. 

Have you thought about being tested for PCOS?  Metformin, often times prescribed for PCOS patients, helps with weightloss b/c of insulin resistance.  I understand how hard it is to lose weight, I really do b/c it’s a constant battle for me.  I don’t embrace my size.  Have you also tried a low carb diet?  By the way, I understand wanting and trying to lose weight without success.

EDIT: Meal planning and measuring portions helps me.  I have a pedometer that measures steps and 10,000 steps or 5 miles leads to weight loss.  Also, make sure you’re eating enough so your body doesn’t think you’re in starvation mode.

Post # 4
Member
359 posts
Helper bee

I have had the surgery and would love to answer any questions you may have.  ๐Ÿ™‚  I’m an open book when it comes to my WLS.  ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 5
Member
1927 posts
Buzzing bee

Have you talked to your doctor?  I would think your doctor can help advise you the best options for you.  The fact that you are right on the borderline of qualifying makes me think that maybe you should try some other options.  While surgery may seem like a quick and easy fix it’s a lot of strain to put on your body when there are more natural and safe ways to lose the weight.

Post # 6
Member
352 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Jenbee:I have considered this. I went to a meeting with a friend of mine and she ended up doing it. I just couldn’t. Gastric Bypass LITERALLY ruins your body. You will NEVER be able to process natural supplements, minerals and vitamins. You will have to take them in pill form for the remainder of your life. Some people suffer from long-term effects such as stomach ulcers, inability to process certain foods such as meat.

Getting WLS is a lifestyle change. The reason people like you and I can’t lose the weight we want or keep it off is because we’re not committing to a lifestyle change. In order to be successful you need to change the entire way you live, your entire relationship with food and surgery does NOT help this at all. To me, it’s short-term help.

This is why I would never mutilate my body just to be “healthy”. You CAN lose the weight on your own. There is no such thing as “people who can’t lose weight”. That’s a bunch of bullhonkey. A friend of mine has started going to OE (Over-Eaters- Anon meetings. I’ve been thinking about it, maybe you should as well.

Post # 8
Member
2522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@JamieinMN:  Not everyone who is heavy over-eats. There are a myriad of medical reasons why some women simply cannot lose weight and it’s not an excuse. 

Post # 10
Member
352 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Jenbee:That’s because DIETS DON’T WORK. You can’t just do a diet for a month and expect results overnight and weight to stay off. I wish that was the case but it’s not. I’ve started making small changes and I’ve noticed a very big difference. I haven’t lost alot of weight, but my clothes are fitting better.

Post # 11
Member
359 posts
Helper bee

@JamieinMN:  Is 9 years considered “short term”?  My surgery was August 6, 2002, and while I have put on about 20 pounds since my absolute lightest weight, I have still managed to keep off 120 of the 140 pounds I lost.

You are right in the fact that this surgery isn’t a “fix all”.  It is a tool – not a solution.  The surgery doesn’t fail people – people fail the surgery.

Post # 12
Member
352 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@FlutterbyBee:9 years, good for you! Some people have success, most do not. The surgery OBVIOUSLY works, it’s the people who can’t commit to changing.

“Getting WLS is a lifestyle change. The reason people like you and I can’t lose the weight we want or keep it off is because we’re not committing to a lifestyle change. In order to be successful you need to change the entire way you live, your entire relationship with food and surgery does NOT help this at all. To me, it’s short-term help.”

Post # 14
Member
1934 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I, myself, have not had elective surgery, but my cousin did.  She had gastric bypass and it literally almost killed her.  Something internal (honestly, I don’t know all of the medical details) did not heal properly, and actually never “closed” up inside of her.  She had stomach acids leaking through her body.  She got sicker and sicker for years, and they didn’t catch it until recently.  She had to have almost her entire stomach removed, parts of her intestines, and spleen.  Her liver and kidneys have all been damaged.  The doctors said they have no idea how she survived.  Literally, some of her organs have fused together.  She is still eating though some type of tube, which may be in her for the rest of her life. 

That being said, I’m really not trying to scare you….just trying to share my families experience with it. 

Also, my best friend went to a nutritionist who put him on a diet.  Granted, it was a fairly radical diet.  Lots of vitamin shakes and protein bars….it was about 4 months he did this.  He lost 100 pounds (he was over 400 to begin with).  He has since been eating MUCH healthier and in smaller portions….something about this diet was to essentially “restart” your system.  

I hope whatever you decide,  you are successful!  

Post # 15
Member
164 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

From what I understand (which is admittedly limited), the surgery can be a little risky.  I personally exhaust every single option, and it sounds like you may have.  I would talk with your doctor more about it. 

I just started myfitnesspal.com, and I think it will be a helpful tool for you.  It tracks your food and exercise, over a lot of categories (protein, carbs, sugar, etc).  This might help you, pre and post surgery to make sure that even though it seems like you’re eating well, you actually are.  I know for me, I am shocked at the way my numbers work out, especially sugars. Granted, most of those are from fruits and veggies, but still- hard to get those off.

Post # 16
Member
2442 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

Two ladies I work with had surgery.  They were both out a while but came back and have been fine ever since.  Both getting smaller and smaller right before our eyes.  To my knowledge neither had complications and both seem to be doing very well since their returns to work.  

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