(Closed) Indian Garland Exchange during ceremony? HELP!

posted 8 years ago in Intercultural
Post # 3
Member
374 posts
Helper bee

Look up Hindu wedding customs.

Post # 4
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

I exchanged garlands during our Indian wedding in November, but there weren’t any words? It was at the beginning of the reception and we simply took turns putting the garland around each other’s necks while everybody cheered. But no words were spoken!

Post # 5
Member
65 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

At my wedding, we are exchanging garlands as the very first step in the ceremony with the officiant announcing that this symbolizes our intention to marry each other.  It is my understanding (and I could be wrong) that with the arranged marriage tradition, this was done to show that the two people getting married were entering into the marriage freely.

Post # 6
Member
345 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

It may help your googling to know that the garlands are often called “jai mala” or “var mala”… I have never been to a ceremony where specific words were spoken at this time.. the priest normally is saying/singing something most of the time.

Also please keep in mind traditions vary greatly depending on where he’s from!

From here.. “Exchange of Garlands : During the course of the wedding ceremony, the bride and groom exchange flower garlands that they’re given at the beginning of the ceremony with each other. According to Hindu traditions, in other ceremonies and prayers, garlands may only be used once. Once a garland has graced a diety or person, its considered inauspicious if the garland is used or offered to another. The only exception is made during Hindu wedding rituals, and there is a profound philosophy in equality and mutual respect behind this exception. The act of exchanging garlands signifies that the bride and groom are no longer separate individuals, but are now united into a single family unit as equal partners. Given they are now one, they may share garlands, as they will everything else in life. This is similar to the unity candle ceremony observed in Christian weddings. “

You may have more luck posting in the South Asian boards 🙂

Post # 6
Member
2 posts
Wannabee

Firstly, the bride’s parents welcome the bridegroom and his family at the boundary of the house where the wedding is taking place. A red kum-kum (kind of powder) mark is applied to their forehead. Members from both families are formally introduced, marking the start of relationship between two families. The bride and the bridegroom then exchange garlands (jayamaala) and declare: “Let all the learned persons present here know, we are accepting each other willingly, voluntarily and pleasantly. Our hearts are concordant and united like waters.”

 

Melissa413:  

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