(Closed) Infant sleep tips/tricks?

posted 4 years ago in Babies
Post # 2
Member
79 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

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yorp127 :  congratulations on your baby!

my baby is 11 weeks. She also slept in her dock a tot in the first few weeks but she doesn’t like it anymore. Honestly do what works for you and your babe, and looks like you already found a solution. It’s survival for now. Sleep deprivation is no joke. They change so much each day. One day they’re ok with one arrangement, next day it doesn’t work anymore. Good luck bee!

Post # 3
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939 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

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yorp127 :  Congratulations on your little one!

4 days is way too early to expect any kind of sleep pattern.  Some newborns are great sleepers, others, not so much, like my daughter.  At 9 months old, she still doesn’t sleep very well.

For the first couple of weeks when I was on maternity leave I slept in the spare bedroom with her while my husband slept in our room so he could get a full night sleep since he still had to go to work (and he works in healthcare so sleep deprivation would have been really bad for him).  The white noise from a clean air machine helped a bit.  My daughter hated being swaddled.  She slept in the bassinett next to me but I learned that just because she fussed a bit, it didn’t mean I had to pick her up right away.  Sometimes all I had to do was put my hand on her (usually on her tummy) and that seemed to soothe her back to sleep in between feedings.  It’s also tough at that age since they can’t regulate their body temperature so I couldn’t tell if she was too hot or too cold, but I kept the room a bit warmer because she was a winter baby.

I agree at this point it’s survival mode and you need to do what works.  I would try the dock a tot again because maybe he’ll like it today.  Good luck!

Post # 4
Member
489 posts
Helper bee

At this age, you should expect to feed your baby every few hours (1.5-2 hours for breastfeeding and 2-3 hours for formula). I can see you said he only sleeps for a short period in the bassinet/pack and play, but are you sure he is not hungry? 

He also may be cluster feeding (which usually happens in the first week of life. Where they need to eat more often since their stomach is starting to expand. 

This young, there will not be a consistent sleep pattern and it is kind of just like sleep/wake living hell, for lack of a better way to describe it. Unfortunately, it’s something you have to get through.

Post # 6
Member
6257 posts
Bee Keeper

When mine is extra fussy, having his arms straight by his sides in the Halo swaddle has helped (rather than out free or tucked by the chin). He also sleeps in his swing a lot – it has straps (which we aren’t using yet) so there’s no reason a baby would be able to fall out of that and there’s nothing to smother on if you are strapped in/can’t turn over either. I have no idea if it’s “approved” but on fussy nights, I don’t give a crap (I do sleep in the recliner beside him though). Another thing we do is bottle feed at night – if I breastfeed and then pump, I get no sleep. If husband does the bottle while I pump, I’m only up a half hour or so. He always falls asleep on the bed and then I transfer him to his bassinet when I come back into the room.

Honestly though, you may not get real sleep for another month or two and will just have to suffer a bit. Maybe take turns with who spend the night with him and who sleeps in the guest room in peace. Right now our guy, at three months, only wakes 1-2 times after we go to bed for a max of three times a night, since he goes to bed earlier than we do. He very recently has been going back to sleep with a pacifier and not necessarily needed a feeding, too. It might be you’ll just need to wait it out.

Post # 7
Member
524 posts
Busy bee

I’ve been there, so I fully understand you. At that time after several sleepless nights, I decided that something has to be done so that everyone gets some sleep. For us, the solution was for my daughter to sleep on top of me. Yes, completely against the rules, but a) it worked, b) we were sleeping (for two hours at a time between feedings, obviously, but as you know even that means a lot) and c), everyone is alife and well. Just like your husband, mine was at first very scared – then as he saw that everything is fine night after night, he also relaxed and it gave him the possibility to essentially get a full night sleep (it was just me breastfeeding) and work without interruptions.

My personal take on the APA recommendations, which get more and more aggressive each year is that they have found that SIDS occurs only when babies sleep and therefore the only way to prevent SIDS is to prevent babies and thus, parents from sleeping. If it sounds stupid it is, because it is stupid. In particular, it does not take into account the cost of such a strategy.

SIDS occurs with probability 0,01%. Compare that with the probability of getting into a car accident, which is 2% even when you are fully rested. If you drive with your baby in a car when you are sleep-deprived, your risk of an accident increases 4-5 times (if you have slept less than 5 hours, that is). Yes, that makes for 10% risk, compared to 0,01%. You do the math and then explain it to your husband.

Post # 8
Member
194 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

 it does get better! and reasonably quickly. We get 6-9 hours of a night at 11 weeks. 

 

We do

–  tight swaddle.  Arms down by her side. 

– full belly. I do pumped breastmilk but that’s not to say you can’t breastfeed. 

– dark room. 

– bassinet perpendicular to the bed. I can lay in bed and rock it slightly to send her to sleep. 

Post # 9
Member
5648 posts
Bee Keeper

Are you breastfeeding? If so Co sleep. This book is amazing 

Post # 10
Member
2794 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

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blue_cat77 :  fwiw sleep related deaths kill more babies than car accidents each year in the US. So the AAP rules are not just for laughs and giggles, they are recommendations based on peer reviewed, scientific studies.

My baby did not sleep more than 1.5 hours at a time until 4.5 months old. Every day felt like I was dying and I literally thought I was not going to survive the newborn period. On average my baby woke up 12 times a night. However, I was not willing to sacrifice safe sleep no matter what: dockatots, swings, rock and plays, etc are not just not “technically” safe sleep, they are 100% unsafe sleep. It’s not JUST about strangulation or suffocation, but also positional asphyxiation which is a very real risk any time an infant is not sleep flat and firm. For us that meant shifts: my husband would sleep til about 4-6 am and then I would hand baby over and get a few uninterrupted stretches. Swaddles, white noise, and heating up his mattress also helped. I’ll be honest and say it was living hell until sleep training, though. When you’re going through hell – just keep going. 

Post # 11
Member
3926 posts
Honey bee

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yorp127 :  I agree about sticking to safe sleep. For me each week got a little better as baby slept more and more. For the first two weeks my husband and I slept in shifts while the other person fed the baby and held him while he slept, and we switched every 2-3 hours. It sucked, but was better than nothing. Then as each week went by he slept an hour longer, and by two months we were making it to around 7 hours at a time. All babies are different, but the point is it will get better. Trying taking turns to get through, and try different swaddling techniques. White noise and vibrations are also your friend. You can do it! 

Post # 12
Member
6257 posts
Bee Keeper

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carolinabelle :  Look, it’s great to follow all the rules and such, but sometimes it’s just not practical. As mentioned above, the likelihood of mom or dad falling asleep at the wheel is a lot higher if they aren’t getting any sleep.  If all the solutions we came up with for our own babies were “100% unsafe sleep” all of our children would be dead by now.  The human race wouldn’t have survived with cradleboards and various other more primative methods of toting around baby.  Everyone born in the belly sleep time period would be dead.  The kids who sleep in the carseat would asphyxiate.  It’s too alarmist.  Sure some of the solutions are riskier but not by enough to sacrifice mom and dad’s well being entirely.

Post # 13
Member
616 posts
Busy bee

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yorp127 :  Both my kids have hated pack n plays. Pack n plays aren’t equal to a bassinet or crib for comfort or functionality. They’re made for travel or naps not nightly use. I would try an actual bassinet that rocks as it has been a lifesaver for our family or even a crib. We also used swaddle blankets until transitioning to Merlin’s Magic Sleep Suit (you can buy on Amazon.)

A week old baby won’t sleep more then 1-3 hours so don’t expect long stretches yet and try to alternate shifts with your husband.  It gets better. 

Post # 14
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2794 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

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skunktastic :  lots of belly sleeping and car seat sleeping babies DID die. Not all of them, no. But what is your child’s life worth? 

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