(Closed) Introducing cats–any advice/experiences?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

What you should do is keep them in seperate rooms and let them smell each other through the door over the course of a good few days/up to a week. It also helps if you take a sweater that you’ve worn and rub it on the new kitty so that when the other cat smells her she smells like you and it’s not threatening.

That being said, in my experience I’ve only been able to do the two seperate rooms things for like 3 days before I break down and let them meet face to face. For the first while they’re going to likely hiss at each other, etc, so be prepared to likely break up a few fights. Positive reinforcement with treats for good behaviour is always a good thing. Also, make sure to give lots of attention to your male cat so he doesn’t feel like you’re replacing him. In a couple of weeks they’ll likely be fine.

Post # 4
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Bakerella’s advice was right on.  Don’t really have anything else to add, other than to say good luck!  They may fight a little bit until they establish who’s boss, but since they are opposite genders, introductions may go a little more smoothly.

Post # 5
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

My male is 11 and my female is just coming up on 2. He did not like her when we first got her last year, but after she consistently jumped on him and insisted on playing, he started to relax and enjoy playing with her after a couple weeks. Now she follows him around, climbs in whatever little cat bed he’s sleeping in and wedges herself in with him, etc. I think he likes the attention but he pretends to ignore her most of the time. They live a happy coexistence and I like that having a younger kitten to play with has made him a lot more active. He’s lost a couple pounds I think!

Post # 6
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

I would place the food on either side of the door so they get used to the other cats smell while doing a positive activity… eating.

And then the first time they get introduced I would but the newest cat in a carrier in the middle of a room and let the current cat that lives there approach the carrier on his/her terms. Leave them like that for at least an hour. You could do that for an hour or two for a few days while separating them by room the rest of the time.

Post # 8
Member
578 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

All the advice above is what I did after we adopted our precious baby girl Chloe.  At first Samoa was very unsure of her.  Hes younger and smaller. We did the food under the door thing and we took a pet blanket and rubbed it on each of them and then left it out. Here they are!

 

 

Post # 9
Member
452 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

I agree with what everyone said so far.  We kept ours separate by a door and let them smell each other.  You could put something that smells like the new cat in the old cats room.  We also put the new cat in his crate and let the old cat smell after we did the door smelling.  I think they will resolve the food issue themselves.  🙂  Good luck!

Post # 10
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Generally free-feeding is not a good idea.  It’s usually best to put the food down for a few minutes, then pick it up and offer it again at the next meal time, (you could do smaller meals more often for your male, if you wanted, which might also make your female think she was getting more).  

We had a cat that had a health issue that affected his metablosim, however, and he NEEDED to be free fed.  We also have a cat who, ever since being starved as a kitten (before we got him, of course), will eat anything in sight.  So obviously we couldn’t leave food out for out other cat.  We have a walk-in pantry, so what we did was put our older cat’s bowl in the pantry and put him in there several times throughout the day.  It got to the point where he would sit on the rug outside the pantry door when he wanted to be let in, then meow for us to come let him out when he was done eating.  Putting you male’s bowl in a different room that the female is not allowed in might be soemthing you could try for your two kitties!

Post # 12
Member
211 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

What I also think helps is to be very affectionate to the cat that has already been living there and mostly ignore the new cat for the first few days. This way the old cat doesn’t feel like they are being replaced. Let the old cat approach the new cat while showing a lot of encouragement and affection to the old cat. This is what my Mom did and it worked. Her two cats ended up liking each other and becoming close.

Post # 13
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

@Shirinjoon: If you found your second cat as a stray (Thanks for rescuing her, BTW!  That’s awesome!), you have made sure she’s had her shots and been to the vet, right?  Feline Leukemia and FIV are transmitted through cat-to-to cat contact, and you want to make sure your new kitty is free of these illnesses before you introduce them.

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