(Closed) Invitation Wording: What do you think?

posted 7 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

Hard to tell out of context and with so much information blocked out, but seems pretty good πŸ™‚

ETA: I’m team “two thousand eleven” not “two thousand AND eleven” but I suppose that’s a stylistic choice that’s up to you.

Post # 4
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2013

It’s a very formal, traditional invitation. I don’t see anything wrong with…
My parents are not piching in money wise for my wedding nor is the Fiance family, so we are not having “our parents invite you to…”  It’s our wedding so “We are inviting you to ..” It’s all about personal choices and the invite you have looks wonderful, as long as it reflects you your SO and your wedding theme you are good to go!

Post # 6
Member
646 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

That’s exactly what we did!  Although I agree that the year is two thousand eleven.

Post # 7
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011 - St. Joseph's Parish, Seattle Tennis Club

Looks fine, although I noticed that you have “two thousand and eleven,” which drives me nuts! It should be “two thousand eleven.” πŸ™‚ But yes, other than that, I think this should be fine. Also, this may be a personal preference (not an invite-wording expert!), but since you’re not including a title on your name, may want to leave off the Mr. on his? Anyone else have thoughts on that?

Post # 9
Member
1556 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

My very first Weddingbee post was asking about the wording for a Catholic invitation.  I got a lot of good ideas from it.  I guess I should have known we’d have special rules…

http://boards.weddingbee.com/topic/are-you-using-catholic-wording-in-your-invitations

I don’t think it’s really proper to say you are inviting someone to the Nuptial Mass of the bride to the groom.  It’s the Nuptial Mass uniting the bride and the groom.

Catholic invitations usually use the word AND, not TO, because the bride and the groom in a Catholic ceremony are being joined together.  The bride is not being married off to the groom.  It’s a small distinction, but a meaningful one.

I’d suggest:

Mr. and Mrs.XXXXX

request the honour of your presence

at the Nuptial Mass uniting their daughter

XXXXXXX

and

Mr. XXXXXXX

son of Mrs. XXX and the late Mr. XXXX

in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony

 

Saturday, the XXXX of XXX

two thousand eleven

at XXX o’clock in the afternoon

 

XXXX Catholic Church

1234 ABC Street

XXXX, XXXXX

 

Post # 10
Member
1876 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

two thousand eleven = 2011

two thousand and eleven = 2000.11

lol I see that you already agreed to make that change, i’m just pointing out the difference to the bess who might not know.

Post # 13
Member
106 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

“two thousand and eleven” is the formal (british) way of saying the year.  I’m all for “two thousand eleven”… but if you make that change, then you should also change “honour” to “honor” for consistency purposes.

Post # 14
Member
10 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Why would you use “honour” but not “two thousand and eleven”  it is exactly the same issue, British English vs. American English?

Post # 15
Member
7 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2011

How would you alter the wording if it is not a “full Mass”? Would you word the invite the same as if it were not taking place in a Catholic church?

And, if you are unsure on the “honour v. honor” wording, maybe consider changing it to “request the pleasure of your company . . .” ? While I’m obviously novice at wedding invitation wording etiquette, I have yet to see why this might be an unacceptable alternative–if so, please feel free to correct me πŸ™‚ .

Post # 16
Member
1556 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@MrsLawDocToBee:  If you are not having a full mass, you can do the invitation the same way that other churches do, or you could say something like:

Mr. and Mrs.XXXXX

request the honour of your presence

as their daughter,

XXXXXXX

and

Mr. XXXXXXX

are united in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony

 

But you do want to keep “honour of your presence” rather than “pleasure of your company” because the latter is used when the wedding is being held outside of a church, e.g., in someone’s home, on a beach, etc.

I don’t have a good explanation why in the US we use the British spelling of “honour,” but keep the date as “two thousand eleven.”  But that is “correct” according to Emily Post…but I’ve seen the date both ways.

EDIT:  That “sacrament of holy matrimony” wording only works if both bride and groom are baptized.  Otherwise, I’d stick with the standard non-Catholic wording.

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