(Closed) Invite wording

posted 5 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
3778 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Here’s what I did:

Married couples (same last name):

Mr. & Mrs. John Smith

123 Any Street

New york, NY 12345

 

Married with Kids:

Mr. & Mrs. John Smith

Billy, Jimmy, and Mary (kids listed oldest to youngest)

123 Any Street

New York, NY 12345

 

Married but different last names:

Mr. John Smith and Mrs. Jane Doe

123 Any Street

New York, NU 12345

 

Non married couples: 

Mr. John Smith and Ms. Jane Doe

123 Any Street

New York, NY 12345

 

Single with plus 1:

Mr. John Smith and Guest

123 Any Street 

New York, NY 12345

Post # 4
Member
257 posts
Helper bee

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith is proper. I am using John and Jane Smith.

Post # 6
Member
3778 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@star282:  I wrote the names on the same line if it would fit. We printed clear address labels and stuck them on the envelopes so we had size constraints. If the names didn’t fit on one line, I put them on two.

Post # 7
Member
2376 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@s2bmrscook:  +1

The only thing I might add would be the couple with kids, it’s acceptable to write The Smith Family as well as listing out all the children, particularly if they’re younger. Names should all be on the same line, regardless of length of name.  The only exception would be the name was so long that it didn’t fit.

Post # 9
Member
1699 posts
Bumble bee

@star282:  Are you in the United States, or elsewhere in the English-speaking world. Oddly enough, it makes a difference.

 

On the invitation proper if it has a write-in line, or on the inner envelope if it does not:

Mr and Mrs Smith”  or “Mr Smith and Ms Smith” (if you are not in the US)

Mr. and Mrs. Smith”  or “Mr. Smith and Ms. Jones” (if you are in the US)

 

On the outer envelope:

Mrs John Smith”  or “Mrs Jane Smith” or “Ms Smith” (if you are not in the US)

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith”  or “Mr. John Smith and Mrs. Jane Smith”  or “Mr. John Smith and Ms. Jones” (if you are in the US)

Do not use “&” when you mean “and”.

You must find out the lady’s preference with regard to her title, first name, and surname; and you must use the form that she prefers. “Mr and Mrs John Smith” is NOT more ‘proper’ if she prefers not to use the name “Mrs John Smith”; it is in fact rude, and you are NOT “following etiquette” if you are knowingly doing something that offends.

Post # 10
Member
124 posts
Blushing bee

Thanks for asking this question, OP, and thanks to Aspasia for the great info!

The topic ‘Invite wording’ is closed to new replies.

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